10:20am

Thu June 2, 2011
All Politics are Local

East Kentucky City may be Dissolved

Residents in the city of Wallins will soon be faced with a petition to dissolve their long defunct city. It is the county that plans to go door-to-door to gather signatures. The petition will mark the start of a legal process to formally dissolve the city by circuit judge’s order. “No one ran for anything in the city during the last race for offices in the county,” said Harlan County Judge-Executive Joe Grieshop. “That is telling of where people are. They have accepted the fact that Wallins can not go back to what it was.”

10:17am

Thu June 2, 2011
Middle East

Bahrain's Crackdown Creates Sectarian Fallout

The Mo'men mosque in Nwaidrat stood in the same location for generations until it was bulldozed last month. The Sunni-run government in Bahrain has destroyed at least 47 Shiite mosques in recent weeks.
Roy Gutman MCT/Getty Images

The mass protest movement that swept Bahrain in February and March has since turned into a bitter sectarian confrontation. The tiny island nation — a key U.S. ally in the Persian Gulf — is mostly populated by Shiites, but it's ruled by a Sunni royal family.

Analysts say the family is now pushing a sectarian agenda that might eventually be its undoing.

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10:16am

Thu June 2, 2011
The Commonwealth

Flooded Lands Sprayed for Mosquitos

Following the successful completion of aerial spraying to treat adult mosquitos, state and local officials are ready to begin the second phase of an effort to rid more than 700,000 acres of western Kentucky of a growing pest problem caused by last month's flooding.

10:14am

Thu June 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Drug Tests For Welfare Recipients, State Workers Ignites Debate In Florida

They'll need to be filled. (2004 file photo.)
Ron Wurzer Getty Images

The legal challenges have begun to new rules in Florida that mandate drug tests for welfare recipients and new state government hires, and random testing of current state employees.

The Miami Herald writes that:

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10:05am

Thu June 2, 2011
Krulwich Wonders…

The Hardest Working Mom On The Planet

Antar Dayal Getty Images

This is egg laying season, if you're a bird.

If you're an octopus, particularly a giant Pacific octopus, you've been there, done that. In fact, you died doing it, in what is the saddest mommy story I've heard in a long while. It comes from biologist Jim Cosgrove who describes it all in a lecture he calls, "No Mother Could Give More."

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10:03am

Thu June 2, 2011
New In Paperback

New In Paperback: May 30 - June 5

The Lake Shore Limited: A Novel

by Sue Miller

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9:59am

Thu June 2, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Agent who led Corruption Case Dies at 46

The FBI special agent who headed a watershed investigation into public corruption in Clay County has died. Timothy S. Briggs, 46, apparently suffered a heart attack while jogging with another agent Tuesday near the FBI office in London. Briggs was a dogged, hard-working investigator who was passionate about rooting out corruption and other crimes, said officials who worked with him.

9:59am

Thu June 2, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Rare Bacterial Strain Identified As Cause Of European Outbreak

Originally published on Fri June 3, 2011 9:06 am

A couple of E. Coli bacteria captured in an image from the Helmholtz Center for Research on Infectious Diseases in Berlin earlier this week.
Manfred Rohde Getty Images

Update 3:58 p.m.: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Dr. Robert Tauxe, deputy director for the division of foodborne, bacterial and mycotic diseases, tells NPR's Richard Harris the bacterium seen in the European outbreak isn't brand new. Tauze identified it as E. coli O104:H4. "This organism that's been isolated from the sick people in Germany has been seen before," he says.

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9:55am

Thu June 2, 2011
The Commonwealth

African-Americans Reflect on Civil War

For 46 years, Dorothy Tolliver has lived down the street from the Jefferson Davis State Historic Site in Fairview. When her two children were young, Tolliver, who is black, remembers playing with them on a swing set next to the site’s monument on sunny afternoons. Tolliver acknowledged the irony of having so many happy moments near a monument commemorating an oppressive figure to some African-Americans. The park was established by Confederate veterans in 1924. In 46 years, Tolliver had never seen an event or program focused on African-American life there.

9:55am

Thu June 2, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Despite Law, China Wants Arms

Joseph A. Bosco served in the office of the secretary of defense as China country desk officer from 2005 to 2006 and previously taught graduate seminars on China-U.S. relations at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. He is now a national security consultant.

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