4:00am

Thu August 18, 2011
NPR Story

Obama To Propose Jobs Measure After Vacation

President Obama is off to New England later today for a family vacation. He returned to the White House last night after a three-day bus tour through the upper Midwest. The campaign-style trip produced little in the way of new ideas for boosting job growth. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

4:00am

Thu August 18, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne and David Greene have the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu August 18, 2011
NPR Story

Retailer Doesn't Like What It Sees On 'Jersey Shore '

Retailer Abercrombie and Fitch is offering to pay one of the stars of MTV's "Jersey Shore" program to not wear its clothing in public. The company says Michael "The Situation" Sorrentino's image is contrary to the image it wants to cultivate.

12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Theater

Wendy Wasserstein, 'Lost' And Found

From the late 1970s until her death in 2006, at the age of 55, playwright Wendy Wasserstein was a force in the New York theatre. She won the Pulitzer, the Tony and many other awards for writing about her generation of educated, successful women struggling to balance their professional and family lives.

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12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Games & Humor

The Addictive Appeal Of Bananagrams

Players form words from a pile of tiles in the center. Once all the tiles have been picked, the first to finish yells "Bananas!"
Flickr/moonlightbulb

A game out of Rhode Island is fast becoming a major player in the board game industry. Bananagrams, as the company and game are called, is an anagram puzzle built for speed; think of Scrabble with no board or complicated scoring.

And despite the down economy, the company that makes the game is thriving.

More Fun Than A ...

The first time Seth Snyder played Bananagrams, he became an addict. It made sense — the 25-year-old industrial designer is into word games and puzzles — but nothing had him this hooked.

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12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Health

Benefits For Severely Disabled Children Scrutinized

To those who believe the federal Supplemental Security Income program for severely disabled children is a lifesaver and not a boondoggle, Hulston Poe is a great example.

The 4-year-old was diagnosed with severe ADHD last October, after more than a year of violent temper tantrums, and kicked out of preschool. Case workers said there wasn't much they could do for him.

"We were at a standstill," says his mother, Suzanne Poe, who was scraping by as a single parent of two in Des Moines, Iowa.

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12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Economy

Why Does The U.S. Sneeze When Europe Gets A Cold?

The crisis in Europe is one of the underlying causes of recent wild swings in U.S. stock markets. U.S. bank stocks in particular suffer badly with any sign that Europe's debt crisis might be worsening.

But the U.S. financial sector's vulnerabilities in Europe are hard to quantify.

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12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Small Businesses, Big Problems

Wage Rules Twist Steel Company's Growth Plans

Precision Ironworks President Steve Leighton, right, says government regulations are keeping his company from growing.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Fourth of a five-part series

Despite the weak economy, Precision Iron Works — a small business in Pacific, Wash. — is hoping to expand, but government rules and regulations are making it more difficult, its president says.

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12:01am

Thu August 18, 2011
Law

Verdict In Katrina Shooting Buoys Police Reform

Ted Jackson The Times-Picayune /Landov

On Aug. 5, a federal jury handed down one of the most sweeping verdicts in the modern history of American police brutality cases. Five New Orleans police officers were convicted of various roles in gunning down civilians in the days after Hurricane Katrina, and then covering it up. Five other officers pleaded guilty.

The Danziger Bridge case, as it's called, adds momentum to a reform effort already under way. The Department of Justice says it's committed to cleaning up the New Orleans Police Department, once and for all.

'This Will Not Stand'

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7:23pm

Wed August 17, 2011
The Two-Way

Riot Planner 'Somewhat Shocked' At Four-Year Sentence; Plans Appeal

It seems likely that two British men sentenced to serve four years in prison for plotting riots — which did not take place — will appeal their sentences. Their punishments were handed down less than a week after Britain was seized by fiery riots.

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