12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
Children's Health

Junk Food Fight: Should Ads Stop Targeting Teens?

Originally published on Wed June 22, 2011 9:01 am

A screen shot of Doritos Asylum 626 project, an interactive, online horror movie created to attract teenage consumers.
Asylum 626

The government says junk food marketers shouldn't advertise to kids. Not just on TV, but also online, in schools and in stores.

The guidelines being proposed are voluntary; food companies can opt out. Still, with four powerful agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration, throwing their weight behind the proposal, the food industry is taking the measure seriously.

One of the most contentious issues is whether the marketing limits should be applied to older kids, aged 12 to 17 — like 13-year-old Reed Weisenberger.

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
Politics

In Congress, A Bipartisan Push For Afghan Drawdown

Originally published on Wed June 22, 2011 7:30 am

Growing numbers of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are balking both at the length of the war in Afghanistan and its cost.

Late last month, a few weeks after U.S. forces killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Pakistan, the Republican-run House voted on a bipartisan amendment aimed at hastening an end to the war in Afghanistan. To the surprise of many, it fell just six votes shy of passing.

Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ) was one of 26 members of his party who joined nearly every Democrat in voting for the measure.

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
National Security

U.S. Prods Europe On NATO Spending

Defense Secretary Robert Gates urges NATO members to boost defense spending. He is speaking on June 10 in Brussels.
John Thys AFP/Getty Images

One of the calculations in President Obama's decision Wednesday on U.S. troops in Afghanistan is the growing concern about the cost of military operations — not only in that country, but in other areas as well.

Funding for NATO is coming under the microscope amid growing complaints about the U.S. paying a disproportionate share to the alliance.

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
World

Volatile Food Prices Grab G-20's Full Attention

Earth from a beet field in northern France hit by drought — the country's worst in 50 years. Crop shortages in Europe and the U.S. have led some experts to predict a rise in grain prices like those that sparked riots in 2008.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

Agriculture is topping the G-20 agenda for the first time as agriculture ministers from the world's largest economies gather in Paris beginning Wednesday.

Ever since a dramatic spike in world food prices in 2008 sparked panic and deadly riots in countries across three continents, agriculture and food security have become issues of global, political importance.

And crop shortages this year have some experts already predicting another rise in grain prices like that of 2008.

Crops Hit By Drought

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
China: Beyond Borders

China's Businesses Boom, But Its Brands Don't

Commuters stand in front of billboards outside a shopping mall in Beijing. Brand logos are a common sight in China — but not for homegrown companies.
Liu Jin Getty Images

This month, NPR is examining the many ways China is expanding its reach in the world — through investment, infrastructure, military power and more.

After 30 years of mind-bending economic growth, everyone knows about brand China — but very few people can name a Chinese brand. And the reasons for that are not just economic.

In a bustling market near the center of the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, Soray Peah, 24, is testing the ringtones on a cellphone she wants to buy.

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
Politics

The 'Country Lawyer' Shaping Campaign Finance Law

Originally published on Wed June 22, 2011 2:33 pm

Attorney James Bopp talks to the media outside the Supreme Court on April 28, 2010, after arguing a case testing whether the names on a petition asking for the repeal of Washington state's domestic partnership rights should be kept secret.
Evan Vucci AP

A new loophole is being pried open in the campaign finance rules. It would enable federal candidates to once again solicit corporate money to finance organizations that promise to help them get elected.

The idea comes from a lawyer who has done more than anyone else over the years to upset the status quo in America's political money laws — James Bopp Jr., of Terre Haute, Ind.

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12:01am

Wed June 22, 2011
Business

'Made In America' Store Capitalizes On Patriotism

Originally published on Wed June 22, 2011 6:33 am

Customers are eager to shop the store's 3,000 American-made products.
Daniel Robison for NPR

Dozens of tour buses have added the tiny town of Elma, N.Y., as a stop this year. On their way to scenic sites like Niagara Falls, these tourists are squeezing in a visit to the Made in America store.

Shop owner Mark Andol climbs aboard a bus and tells the riders that shopping here is a patriotic act.

"When you walk through them doors, I guarantee when you're shopping — the homework's been done — it's 100 percent made-in-America products. Made in this country by American workers, and the money stays in our economy. So, enjoy yourself," he says.

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10:00pm

Tue June 21, 2011
Sweetness And Light

Who Wants To Be The GOAT?

Spain's Rafael Nadal (right) and Switzerland's Roger Federer pose with their trophies after the men's final match at the 2011 French Open. The two men are currently playing in the 2011 Wimbledon Championships.
Lionel Cironneau ASSOCIATED PRESS

Always, the worst thing you could call an athlete was "goat." He's the chump who cost his team by dropping a fly ball, making a turnover, fumbling.

Bill Gallo, the beloved New York Daily News cartoonist, would draw a portrait of the goat of every World Series game, depicting the poor stiff with horns for ears. In fact, I suspect the designation of the goat as the figure of ridicule derives from the medieval sign of the horn for a cuckolded husband.

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7:08pm

Tue June 21, 2011
It's All Politics

Newt Gingrich Loses Two Top Fundraisers

The political world learned Tuesday that two more aides, this time top fundraisers, quit Newt Gingrich's campaign.

The official word is that financial director Jody Thomas and consultant Mary Heitman decided to "step away from the campaign." That's the campaign's phrasing.

Their departure comes 12 days after Gingrich's top campaign strategists all quit along with grassroots organizers in Iowa, the first state in the Republican nomination contest, and staff in New Hampshire and South Carolina.

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