12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Music News

Major Trove Of Classical Music Manuscripts For Sale

J.S. Bach's Cantata No. 171 is part of the Lehman collection. The iron-gall ink Bach used to compose the piece has eroded the paper.
Caroline Cooper

For music lovers, some melodies may seem priceless. But if you ever wondered what music is really worth — like the original manuscript to Maurice Ravel's Bolero? That score and about 200 more, which reside at New York's Morgan Library, are on sale for $135 million. They are part of the esteemed Lehman Collection — a group of nearly 200 scores that reads like a greatest hits of classical music. Christoph Wolff, a professor of music history at Harvard, calls it "the trophy collection."

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Books

Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With The Wind' Turns 75

Gone with the Wind." href="/post/margaret-mitchells-gone-wind-turns-75" class="noexit lightbox">
Margaret Mitchell, pictured above in 1941, started writing while recovering from an ankle injury in 1926. She had read her way through most of Atlanta's Carnegie Library, so her husband brought home a typewriter and said: "Write your own book to amuse yourself." The result was Gone with the Wind.
Al Aumuller/Telegram & Sun Library of Congress

In June 1936, a blockbuster of a book was published; it gave the world a sense of the Old South, an unforgettable heroine and (in the movie version) the phrase "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn."

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind sold one million copies in its first six months, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937, and brought an explosion of unexpected, unwished for celebrity to its author.

In Mitchell's hometown of Atlanta, Ga., a lovely old apartment building on South Prado Street bears a big, brass plaque. It reads:

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Politics

Is GOP Resolve On Taxes Showing Cracks?

Is Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, losing his legendary grip on GOP lawmakers?
Win McNamee Getty Images

Most Senate Republicans voted two weeks ago to end a tax break for ethanol. Some see that vote as a chink in the armor of anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist and the no-new-taxes pledge he's gotten almost every GOP lawmaker to take.

Senate Democrats are still crowing about the day when more than two-thirds of their GOP colleagues seemed to set aside their anti-tax increase orthodoxy.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Latin America

Chavez Reappears, But His Illness Remains A Mystery

This handout photo released by the Cuban website www.cubadebate.cu shows former Cuban President Fidel Castro and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez reading Tuesday's edition of the state newspaper Granma, in Havana on Tuesday.
AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's colorful and bombastic leader has reappeared after a long public absence.

President Hugo Chavez, who frequently goes on air to accuse the U.S. of plotting against him, hadn't been seen since June 10 when he underwent surgery in Cuba. But now, he's surfaced in a video, spiritedly talking to Fidel Castro.

"Socialism or death - we'll be victorious," said Chavez, who appeared to be walking gingerly as he spoke to Castro.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
China: Beyond Borders

China's Rise: Inward Looking Or Expansionist?

It often appears as if modern Chinese power is more aimed at erasing a painful past than at writing a dominant future. But there is one topic where the peace-loving Chinese seem worryingly militaristic: Taiwan.
AFP/Getty Images

This month, NPR is examining the many ways China is expanding its reach in the world — through investment, infrastructure, military power and more.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Reporter's Notebook

Tripoli's Lone Chinese Restaurant Still Delivers

Chef Lao Wei Xiong cooks up a carry-out order for foreign reporters in the kitchen at al Maida restaurant in Tripoli.
NPR

Most foreigners fled Libya earlier this year when a popular uprising to oust Moammar Gadhafi turned into a brutal war. But in Tripoli, one Chinese family that runs a restaurant is trying to hang on.

Few people come to al Maida Chinese restaurant, which once counted Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, among its customers. NATO airstrikes and gun-toting thugs make eating out an unsavory prospect for most people still in the capital.

The exceptions are foreign journalists seeking an escape from the lackluster cuisine of the hotel they are restricted to by the Libyan government.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 30, 2011
Business

Banks Ordered To Lower Retailers' Debit Fees

Starting in October, banks aren't going to be able to charge as much as they used to when consumers pay by debit card. The Federal Reserve has issued a final rule on so-called "swipe fees" that are charged to merchants every time a debit card is used.

Retailers have been complaining for years about the fees banks charge whenever a customer pulls out a debit card. Congress listened last year and included an amendment in the big financial overhaul to limit fees on debit transactions.

Read more

6:23pm

Wed June 29, 2011
The Two-Way

News Corp. Takes Huge Loss, Selling Myspace For $35 Million

Loic Venance AFP/Getty Images

Back in 2005, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. bought Myspace for a stunning $580 million. Today, News Corp. sold the struggling social network to an advertising targeting firm for $35 million.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Read more

5:42pm

Wed June 29, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Fireworks Stands in Sight

The upcoming Fourth of July weekend is expected to be a little louder and flashier than usual across Kentucky.  The number of fireworks stands across the commonwealth is way up over last year.

State Fire Marshall Bill Swope says 420 people received permits to sell fireworks last year.  This summer, that figure has ballooned to 776 permits.  Swope says the vast majority of those permits are for seasonal sales through July seventh.

Read more

5:35pm

Wed June 29, 2011
Technology

Facebook's Newest Challenger: Google Plus

A screen shot of Google Plus.

Google is trying once again to challenge Facebook's domination of the social networking business. Its main social networking site "Orkut" is very popular in Brazil, but in the rest of the world, Google trails Facebook.

But the company has a new attempt to catch up.

The new social network is called Google Plus, and you're not allowed to join it. At least, not yet.

"It's small but growing," says Bradley Horowitz, who oversees Google's communications products and social applications.

Read more

Pages