8:23am

Fri July 1, 2011
Opinion

The Nation: You Swipe Card, Banks Swipe Cash

The average fee in America for each card swipe is 44 cents — the highest in the world.
Elaine Thompson AP

George grew up in Buffalo, NY and holds a B.A. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Prior to joining The Nation, George was Senior Reporter/Blogger for ThinkProgress.org. He worked as a researcher for Michael Moore's SiCKO and as an Associate Producer on "The Media Project" on the Independent Film Channel. His work has been published in The Los Angeles Times, Media Matters, and The Buffalo News.

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8:20am

Fri July 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Minnesota Government Shuts Down; NBA Moves To Lock Out Players

Good morning.

The sexual assault case against former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn may be collapsing, as we reported earlier, and the White House wants a deal on the debt ceiling and budget deficit by July 22.

Other stories making headlines include:

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8:03am

Fri July 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Strass-Kahn's Supporters Talk Of Political Resurrection

June 6, 2011, file photo: Dominique Strauss-Kahn during a hearing in New York State Supreme Court.
Allan Tannenbaum AFP/Getty Images

"Reports that the New York prosecution case for alleged sexual assault against Dominique Strauss-Kahn could be close to collapse have stunned France and revived hopes that he may return to politics," The Guardian says.

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7:52am

Fri July 1, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Violent Games Are No Fairy Tale

Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, holds up three video games after a news conference in San Francisco, Monday. The Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to bar children from buying violent video games, saying government doesn't have the authority to "restrict the ideas to which children may be exposed" despite complaints.
Paul Sakuma AP

Jeffrey H. Anderson was the senior speechwriter for Secretary Mike Leavitt at the Department of Health and Human Services.

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7:49am

Fri July 1, 2011
Food

Sweet Treat: July Is National Ice Cream Month

In declaring July ice cream month, President Ronald Reagan cited nutritional benefits, and said it should be observed with "appropriate ceremonies and activities." Americans eat more ice cream than anyone else in the world — on average 20 quarts a year.

7:43am

Fri July 1, 2011
Business

Israelis Protest Price Of Cottage Cheese

Cottage cheese is among the most common foods in Israel. When the dairy industry raised the price, more than 150,000 people joined a Facebook campaign to boycott it. Stunned, executives lowered the price by 25 percent, saying the protest changed the rules of the marketplace.

7:41am

Fri July 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Doneghy Convicted, Faces 30 Year Sentence

 After some 18 hours of deliberation, a jury has found 34 year old Glen Doneghy guilty of second degree manslaughter in the death of Lexington Police Officer Bryan Durman. The twelve member panel also convicted Doneghy on counts of leaving the scene of an accident, second degree assault, fourth degree assault, possession of marijuana, cocaine, and drug paraphernalia.

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7:35am

Fri July 1, 2011
The Two-Way

White House Sees Deficit/Debt Deal Deadline As July 22

"The Obama administration believes congressional leaders must agree to a deficit-reduction deal by July 22 in order to raise the government's borrowing limit in time to avoid a default in early August, according to Democratic officials with knowledge of the negotiations," The Wall Street Journal reports this morning.

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7:29am

Fri July 1, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: Missing Sandra Day O'Connor

Then-Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and her husband John, attend an awards ceremony in Huntington, N.Y on March 9, 2004. O'Connor left the bench to take care of her ill husband in 2007. He died in 2009.
Zach Seckler AP

Jeffrey Rosen is the legal editor of The New Republic.

The Supreme Court term that ended this week would have looked very different if Justice Sandra Day O'Connor were still on the bench. Twenty percent of the cases were decided by a 5-4 vote, and, in many of those cases, Justice O'Connor would have voted to swing the result the other way.

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