1:59pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Kentuckians at War

Beshear Congratulates Medal of Honor Recipient

Frankfort – “Our Commonwealth is full of pride today as one of our own, Kentucky native Marine Sgt. Dakota Meyer, accepts the Congressional Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama for his extraordinary bravery while serving in Afghanistan in 2009," Gov. Steve Beshear said in a press release from his office.

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1:55pm

Thu September 15, 2011
The Two-Way

V.P. Boehner? Not If He Has To Go To Funerals, The Speaker Jokes

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 4:17 pm

One of House Speaker John Boehner's tearful moments came as he took over from Democrat Nancy Pelosi last January.
Charles Dharapak AP

There was a funny moment during House Speaker John Boehner's appearance at The Economic Club of Washington a few minutes ago.

Asked if he might be a possible Republican vice presidential nominee in 2012, Boehner — who's known for his habit of tearing up — joked that it's unlikely he'd be good for that job:

"It's hard enough for me to go to funerals of people I know, much less don't know."

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1:55pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

How The European Debt Crisis Could Spread

A giant logo of the euro can be seen outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany.
AFP/Getty Images

The world's major central banks are so worried about Europe's debt crisis that they are moving to shore up eurozone banks. The troubled banks hold billions in sovereign debt of Greece, Spain, Portugal and other struggling countries.

Left unchecked, this crisis could spill over into the U.S. economy. Here's how Europe's troubles could migrate to the U.S. and the rest of the world.

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1:42pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

EPA Postpones Limits on Power Plant Pollution

According to Reuters, the Environmental Protection Agency won’t meet its deadline for its greenhouse emissions standards for power plants.  Originally, the rules were supposed to be released on September 30.

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1:40pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Women Writers Conference Takes Over Lexington

The 33rd annual Kentucky Women Writers Conference aims to help aspiring writers become better at their craft through workshops and public events. Director Julie Wrinn says the four day celebration provides an opportunity for creative people to come together and share ideas. "Writing is very often a lonely profession that you have to do alone at your desk generally. An event like ours is a great opportunity to find an escape from that loneliness and find some collegiality with other writers."

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1:37pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Business and the Economy

Corvette Museum wants Motorsports Park

Wendell Strode, National Corvette Museum executive director, talks about a proposed motorsports park Wednesday during his presentation to the Bowling Green Noon Rotary Club at Bowling Green Country Club.
Joe Imel Bowling Green Daily News

When an estimated 6,000 to 8,000 Corvette enthusiasts roll into Bowling Green in three years for the 20th anniversary of the National Corvette Museum, officials plan to have a new attraction to show off. Wendell Strode, executive director of the museum, discussed plans Wednesday for a $20 million-plus motorsports park to be built south of Interstate 65 near Exit 28, not far from the museum and General Motors’ Bowling Green Assembly Plant, where Chevy Corvettes are built.

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1:35pm

Thu September 15, 2011
The Two-Way

Postal Service Eyes 250 Processing Facilities For 'Consolidation Or Closure'

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 1:39 pm

U.S. Postal Service mail delivery trucks sit idle at the Manassas post office in Virginia on September 5.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

The beleaguered U.S. Postal Service, which is facing losses of up to $10 billion in the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, today proposed what it says are "sweeping changes designed to save the organization up to $3 billion a year by cutting its network of processing facilities by over half and adjusting service standards."

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1:33pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

Expanding Mammoth Cave's Impact

Bruce Powell (left) of Bowling Green, deputy superintendent at Mammoth Cave National Park, speaks Wednesday during a Biosphere Reserve Council meeting in the Snowball Dining Room at Mammoth Cave.
Alex Slitz The Daily News

Mammoth Cave National Park has a $62 million annual influence on the area’s economy, a number that could be even greater with a renewed emphasis on its designation as an International Biosphere Reserve. About 500,000 visitors come each year to the park, spending $32 million. That, coupled with an annual income of $11 million for the 525 local jobs that are created and $19 million from the ripple effect, adds up to those benefits, according to park Assistant Superintendent Bruce Powell. But that return could be greater if further tourism develops as a result of the cooperation among the park and six counties near the park: Edmonson, Barren, Hart, Warren, Butler and Metcalfe counties.

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1:29pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Into The Wild: Alaskan Train Caters To The Intrepid

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 9:29 am

The Hurricane Turn is one of the last true whistle-stop trains in the country. Alaskans use it to access homes and cabins in the state's remote interior.
Annie Feidt For NPR

There aren't many rules on the train called the Hurricane Turn. Dogs roam the aisles and sit next to their owners on the seats. The baggage car doors are wide open, even when the train is moving.

"Oh yeah, this is like the best job in the whole railroad, you bet," says conductor Wade Sherwood.

The Hurricane Turn is one of the last whistle-stop trains in the U.S. — trains that allow travelers to hop on and off where they choose. With tight schedules to keep, most train operators have abandoned them.

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1:05pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Kentuckians at War

World War II Vet 'Did His Duty,' Lives his Life

In his book from a few years back, Tom Brokaw of NBC News called the men and women who fought for America during World War II “The Greatest Generation.” Brokaw wrote, “They answered the call to save the world from the two most powerful and ruthless military machines ever assembled...They faced great odds and a late start, but they did not protest. They succeeded on every front. They won the war; they saved the world...(They) immediately began the task of rebuilding their lives and the world they wanted...(And) they remain, for the most part, exceptionally modest.”

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