10:03am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Commonwealth

Beshear Recognizes Lemonade Stand

He may only have graduated from kindergarten, but Harrison Owens is already being commended by the head of state. Harrison, 5½, came home last week to find a letter in the mailbox from Gov. Steve Beshear. The letter arrived in response to a letter Harrison sent in April. Harrison had told the governor he planned to hold lemonade stands to raise funds to place seat belts on school buses. The Stamping Ground Elementary School student said it was not safe to ride in vehicles without seat belts.

Read more

9:45am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Today's 'Deficit Deal' Headlines

What's going on with the talks in Washington between Republicans and Democrats over the budget, the debt and the federal debt ceiling? As deadlines approach — the White House wants a deal by July 22 to avoid a potential government shutdown on Aug. 2 — we'll keep an eye on the latest headlines. Here are some of today's (and as often happens on stories like this, there are conflicting reports):

-- Reuters — "Analysis: Debt Deal Not That Far Out Of Reach."

Read more

9:05am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Strauss-Kahn May Face Charges In France

Good morning.

If you're just catching up on things after enjoying a long weekend, here's a quick recap of stories we've already posted about and other headlines:

-- " 'Go To Work!' Minnesotans Vent As State Government Shutdown Continues."

Read more

8:58am

Tue July 5, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Prices Drop For High-Risk Insurance

iStockphoto.com

Will lower premiums for health insurance to cover people with pre-existing conditions make the policies more attractive? We're about to find out.

Experts agreed that high prices for the coverage created under the health care overhaul were partly to blame for anemic enrollment in the plans, which reached just 21,454 after several months. Hundreds of thousands of people had been expected to sign on.

Read more

8:49am

Tue July 5, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: Stop Experimenting With Science

President Barack Obama presents a National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Steven J. Sasson of Eastman Kodak Company during an East Room ceremony on Nov. 17, 2010 at the White House. The president's budget proposal for 2012 offers $900 million to The National Science Foundation, an amount some think is too small.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Stephen Wunker is the Managing Director of New Markets Advisors

Congressional Republicans keep insisting that deep cuts to government spending will help boost growth, and create jobs, in the short term. But that claim doesn't make a lot of sense. Most economists think that federal spending on public works and aid to the states kept the recession from being much worse.

Read more

8:35am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Two-Way

'Go To Work!' Minnesotans Vent As State Government Shutdown Continues

In Minnesota, where the state government has been shut down since Friday while the Democratic governor and Republican-controlled legislature remain at odds over how to fill a $5 billion budget gap, some lawmakers got an earful on Monday as they marched in July 4th parades.

Read more

8:16am

Tue July 5, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Constitution Confusion? Ask A Kid

The United States Constitution sets the framework for how U.S. government is organized.
Victor Pelaez Torres iStockphoto.com

Tony Woodlief is president of the Bill of Rights Institute.

Time magazine is nothing if not direct. Featuring a picture of the Constitution, the bottom half of which has been run through a shredder, today's cover asks: "Does it Still Matter?"

Read more

8:04am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Two-Way

'NYT': Pakistani Spy Agency Ordered Journalist's Killing, U.S. Believes

Syed Saleem Shahzad (July 2008 file photo).
Cristiano Camera AFP/Getty Images

From the top story on the front page of today's New York Times:

"Obama administration officials believe that Pakistan's powerful spy agency ordered the killing of a Pakistani journalist who had written scathing reports about the infiltration of militants in the country's military, according to American officials."

Read more

7:45am

Tue July 5, 2011
The Two-Way

'Global Race' Under Way To Develop Drones, 'Washington Post' Reports

2007 file photo of a U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

"More than 50 countries have purchased surveillance drones, and many have started in-country development programs for armed versions because no nation is exporting weaponized drones beyond a handful of sales between the United States and its closest allies," The Washington Post

Read more

7:37am

Tue July 5, 2011
Opinion

The Nation: America Is Not An Empire

Among all the foreign policy decisions President Obama has made, the most surprising may be the one to go to war in Libya without either requesting a declaration of war from Congress, as required by the Constitution, or obtaining legislative authorization, as required by the War Powers Resolution of 1973. Some have suggested that authorization could have been easily obtained at the time the war was launched, when public sentiment against the murderous Qaddafi regime was running high. In that case, the decision not to ask for it seems an especially gratuitous insult to Congress.

Read more

Pages