11:32am

Wed July 6, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Founding Fathers Opposed Slavery

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann speaks in Charleston, S.C.on June 29, 2011.
Andy Dunaway AP

John McCormack is a staff writer at The Weekly Standard.

One gets the sense that some in the media are doing their best to help Michele Bachmann win the Republican nomination by attacking her over ridiculous kerfuffles. The latest example involves her claim that the Founding Fathers "worked tirelessly" to end slavery. On Good Morning America, host George Stephanopoulos told Bachmann that her claim is "just not true":

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11:19am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

2018 Winter Olympics To Be In South Korea

Feb. 25, 2010, file photo of the Olympic rings in Whistler, Canada, during the Vancouver Winter Olympics.
Richard Heathcote Getty Images

The 2018 Winter Olympics will be in Pyeongchang, South Korea, the International Olympic Committee just announced from Durban, South Africa.

The other finalists were: Munich, Germany, and Annecy, France.

The last time the Winter Olympics were held in Asia was in 1998, at Nagano, Japan.

The 2010 Winter Games were held in Vancouver, Canada. The 2014 Winter Games will be in Sochi, Russia.

Summer Olympics are set for London in 2012 and Rio De Janeiro in 2016.

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10:55am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

Service Sector Has Now Grown For 19 Straight Months, Report Says

Though growth in the service sector slowed a bit in June, that key part of the economy has now expanded for 19 consecutive months, the private Institute for Supply Management reported this morning.

Its service sector index stood at 53.3 percent, a 1.3 percentage points decline from May but still above the 50 percent mark that is said to be the line between growth and contraction.

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10:10am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

Jurors' Thinking In Casey Anthony Trial Starts To Emerge

Tuesday (July 5, 2011): Casey Anthony reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges.
Pool Getty Images

The day-after stories about the not-guilty verdict for Florida mother Casey Anthony, who was accused of killing her 2-year-old daughter Caylee in a case that has dominated the tabloids and cable news networks, include a clue to what the jurors were thinking.

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9:20am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

India's Supreme Court Takes Steps To Protect $22 Billion Treasure

The stunning news Eyder posted Tuesday about a $22 billion treasure in the vaults of a Hindu temple in southern India is followed today by word that:

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9:19am

Wed July 6, 2011
Station News and Events

News Director Joins Board of Public Radio News Directors

WEKU News Director, Charles Compton
EKU

The news director of WEKU, the public radio service of Eastern Kentucky University, has been elected to serve on the Board of Directors of Public Radio News Directors Inc. Charles Compton, who has served as news director at WEKU since 2005, will fill the unexpired term of mid-sized newsroom representative Naomi Starobin, who became the Board’s large market representative

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9:02am

Wed July 6, 2011
Opinion

The Nation: American History 101 For Bachmann

James Madison, the last of the founding fathers, died in 1836, 27 years before the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

John Nichols, a pioneering political blogger, has written the Beat since 1999.

The unsettling thing about Michele Bachmann's failed discussion of the founders and slavery is not that the Tea Party "Patriot" knew so little about the birth of the American experiment that she made John Quincy Adams — the son of a somewhat disappointing founder (John) and the cousin of one of the true revolutionaries (Sam) — into something he was not.

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8:35am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

200 Somalis Presumed Dead After Boat Sinks Off Sudan

Sarura Ali (right) covered her eyes from wind-blown dust as she stood with her six children outside a food distribution point in the Dadaab refugee camp in northeastern Kenya on Tuesday (July 5, 2011). Sarura, her husband and their children trekked for eight days from their home in Sakow, Somalia. War and drought are forcing many Somalis to take desperate measures.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

"About 200 people drowned in the Red Sea [Tuesday]," the BBC writes, "when a boat carrying migrants to Saudi Arabia sank off Sudan's coast after catching fire, Sudanese media says. Only three people have been rescued, according to the Sudanese Media Centre (SMC), a state-linked news agency. A governing party official told the BBC he believed the passengers were Somalis likely to be fleeing the drought."

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8:28am

Wed July 6, 2011
Opinion

Foreign Policy: China Steers Back To The Slow Lane

Workers set an electric moped into the back of a McCar, a new Geely's concept car, at the Shanghai International Auto Show on Wednesday, April 20, 2011 in Shanghai.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Steve LeVine is the author of The Oil and the Glory and a longtime foreign correspondent

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8:15am

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

U.K.'s Hacking Scandal Grows; Minnesota's Shutdown Continues

Good morning.

For dramatic videos, check out the post we put up earlier about last night's dust storm in Phoenix.

We've also already filed on the Obama administration's decision to bring a terrorism suspect from Somalia to New York City for trial in a civilian criminal court.

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