12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
National Security

Leon Panetta: The Battle-Tested Politician

When Leon Panetta was CIA director, he helped lead the effort to find and kill Osama bin Laden.

Now, Panetta may have an even harder job.

He's two months into his tenure as secretary of defense and here's what Panetta has to do: Run two ground wars, keep up the fight against al-Qaida and at the same time figure out how to cut what could end up being a trillion dollars from a Pentagon's budget.

The Laugh

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Your Health

For The Dying, A Chance To Rewrite Life

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 1:47 pm

Kate Frego pins the turban of her mother, Aida Essenburg. Before Essenburg died in July of this year, she sat down with a dignity therapist to record the history of her life in what became a 50-page document.
Courtesy of Kate Frego

For several decades, psychiatrists who work with the dying have been trying to come up with new psychotherapies that can help people cope with the reality of their death. One of these therapies asks the dying to tell the story of their life.

This end-of-life treatment, called dignity therapy, was created by a man named Harvey Chochinov. When Chochinov was a young psychiatrist working with the dying, he had a powerful experience with one of the patients he was trying to counsel — a man with an inoperable brain tumor.

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Planet Money

The Return Of Toxie

Stephen Neary/Connie Li Chan/Robin Arnott

Last year, as part of a reporting project, we bought a toxic asset — one of those complicated financial instruments that that nearly brought down the global economy.

We spent $1000 of our own money and bought a tiny slice of a bond backed by mortgages. We paid just a fraction of what it originally cost. It was such a good deal, we thought maybe we'd make a few bucks, which we'd give to charity.

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Conflict In Libya

NATO's Intervention In Libya: A New Model?

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks in Brussels on Sept. 5. Rasmussen calls NATO's operation in Libya a success that could serve as a model in the future.
Virginia Mayo AP

NATO planes are still in the air and bombing targets over Libya and Moammar Gadhafi is still on the loose. Nonetheless, NATO is taking something of a victory lap in the wake of an operation that broke new ground for the military alliance.

But the Libyan operation also raised questions about its mission, its future role in such conflicts, and how it determines when to intervene.

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen told NPR he sees the Libya operation as a template for future NATO missions and proof the United Nations can outsource its muscle to the alliance.

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Animals

How A Clever Virus Kills A Very Hungry Caterpillar

A healthy gypsy moth caterpillar on a leaf. Outbreaks of gypsy moths damage roughly 1 million acres of forest in the U.S. each year.
Michael Grove Science/AAAS

Scientists say they have figured out how a very clever virus outwits a very hungry caterpillar.

The caterpillar is the gypsy moth in its larval stage, and the invasive species damages roughly a million acres of forest in the U.S. each year by devouring tree leaves.

But the damage would be greater if it weren't for something called a baculovirus that can infect these caterpillars and cause them to engage in reckless, even suicidal behavior, scientists say. The virus is so effective that the government actually sprays it on trees to help control gypsy moth outbreaks.

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Miss. Port Expansion Raises Concern, Hope For Jobs

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 1:39 pm

Anthony and Eunice Crane stand in their backyard in Gulfport, Miss. The new port access road will be built behind their fence. Their home used to back to other homes.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

It's been six years since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, and the rebuilding continues. In Mississippi, the largest project under construction is the Port of Gulfport. Some $500 million in statewide recovery funds are being used to rebuild the port. The state calls it a critical resource, but some residents hit hard by Katrina fear they won't see the benefits.

The Port of Gulfport sits just off Highway 90, a main road that runs all along the coast. Katrina's 30-foot storm surge nearly destroyed this facility, which is the size of about 50 city blocks.

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7:39pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

PHOTOS: Commemorating Sept. 11 In Afghanistan

U.S. soldiers pray during the an anniversary ceremony of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.
John Moore Getty Images

It's been said many times, today: that one of Sept. 11's most significant legacy are the two wars still being fought the by the United States. Perhaps, that's why this set of pictures feels so important. It shows American service members commemorating the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 in simple terms: raising an American flag or bowing in prayer:

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6:00pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Kids and Sept. 11: The Day 'Children Realized ... Grownups Were Vulnerable'

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 7:38 am

Keri McMorrow, 7, visits the memorial pool where her uncle's name is engraved, during tenth anniversary ceremonies of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center site.
Pool Getty Images

It seems there are two types of stories about how children who experienced Sept. 11: First, of course, there are the stories about the children who lost parents on that day, and then there are those who are too young to remember what life was like before the attacks.

NPR's Zoe Chace talked to some of those kids in New York. She filed this report:

Kate Bralauer is 11. She's from Manhattan, she's never seen the skyline with the towers in it. But 9/11 matters to her.

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5:02pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Fighter Jets Scrambled To Escort American Airlines Flight To New York City

NORAD scrambled two F-16 fighter jets to escort an American Airlines flight traveling from Los Angeles to New York, today, after three passengers locked themselves in a bathroom and refused to come out.

The AP reports:

Flight 34 landed safely after 4 p.m. Sunday. The nature of the incident was unclear but a law enforcement official says it isn't thought to be terrorism.

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3:47pm

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

How Aaron Brown Became CNN's Voice Of Sept. 11

Aaron Brown reported for 17 straight hours on Sept. 11, 2001.
Courtesy of YouTube

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Aaron Brown came into work at CNN still preparing for his new role as the anchor of the network's flagship evening broadcast. He wasn't supposed to go on air for several more weeks, but on that morning and in the days that followed, Brown became the guide for millions of viewers glued to their television sets.

As he scurried to the roof of CNN's headquarters in New York shortly after the towers were hit, Brown remembers stopping in the middle of 8th Avenue and telling himself to stay calm.

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