4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Rebekah Brooks Survives Phone-Hacking Scandal

At the heart of the phone-hacking scandal threatening Rupert Murdoch's empire, is a woman who's been described as a "tough social climber" with "long flame-red hair." The woman is Rebekah Brooks, head of the British arm of News Corp. Andy McSmith wrote a profile of Brooks for Britain's "Independent" newspaper, and he talks to Mary Louise Kelly about it.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Partisan Rancor Heats Up In Debt-Ceiling Talks

Deficit-cutting negotiations continue with little apparent progress. Time is running short to raise the government's debt limit so lawmakers are beginning to consider alternatives, in case no deal is made.

12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Author Interviews

For 'Stanton,' All Women Were Not Created Equal

Lori Ginzberg is a professor of history and women's studies at Penn State University. Elizabeth Cady Stanton is her sixth book.
Ken Yanoviak

Much of America as we know it evolved in the 19th century, as we'll explore in a series of three conversations this week with writers who seek out new ways to understand old events.

In 1979, 19th-century activist Susan B. Anthony became the first woman to appear on a circulating United States coin. Anthony is remembered for her work in fighting for women's right to vote, but it was her friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton who actually launched the women's rights movement. She, however, never got a coin.

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
The Economy's 'New Normal'

Renewed Focus On Innovation Could Boost Economy

President Obama tours Cree, Inc., a manufacturer of energy efficient LED lighting, in North Carolina on June 13. Economists believe the innovation of new technology would create jobs and boost the economy.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

In a sluggish economy with slow growth and high unemployment, innovation may be part of the solution.

Tom Clement is just the sort of entrepreneur the U.S. needs to propel the economy. He loves brainstorming and developing new ideas and turning them into products and companies.

Back in the mid-1980s, he climbed Mount Everest. When his friends asked if he was frightened, he told them no, just excited. Clement says starting a new business is a lot like scaling mountains .

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Animals

Paying Attention To A Forgotten Navy Pig's Plaque

Originally published on Mon July 18, 2011 4:45 pm

Jim Goddard, a retired shop owner from Anna, Ill., sits next to a plaque dedicated to his grandpa's pig, King Neptune. The plaque reads: "King Neptune: 1942 to 1950. Navy Mascot Pig."
Jacob McCleland for NPR

This story is first in an ongoing series called Honey, Stop The Car: Monuments That Move You, which checks out memorials across the country that inspire drivers to pull over.

Growing up in Union County, a farming region in southern Illinois, I heard stories about this enormous 700-pound pig named King Neptune. Old farmers made passing reference, but I never knew much about him until recently.

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Middle East

Rifts Develop In Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood

In Egypt, the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood is now the most organized political force in the country. It is poised to capture a significant amount of power in nationwide elections being planned for the fall.

But dissension in the brotherhood's ranks has been growing since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak. Key figures in the group are bolting, and at least one has been expelled, causing some in Egypt to question whether the decades-old movement can survive.

Members Split Off For New Parties

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Environment

As Focus On Fracking Sharpens, Fuel Worries Grow

Originally published on Wed July 13, 2011 10:38 am

A controversial technique for producing oil and natural gas called hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — has led to drilling booms from Texas to Pennsylvania in recent years. But there are concerns that it may be polluting drinking water.

As policymakers in Washington discuss how to make fracking safer, there is concern that fracking itself has become a distraction.

In the U.S., pretty much all of the oil and gas that was easy to get to is gone. Fracking makes it possible to extract petroleum from hard-to-reach places — say, a mile underground in dense layers of shale.

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Politics

GOP Presidential Hopefuls Weigh In On Debt Ceiling

The debt-ceiling battle between President Obama and the Republican leadership has dominated Washington this week and become a hot topic among GOP presidential hopefuls on the campaign trail. While they are unified in their criticism of the White House, there are differences among the candidates over what kind of deal – if any — should be struck.

Meeting with voters at a coffeehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) said it's an easy call.

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Poppy Crops Set To Bloom If Afghanistan Aid Withers

An Afghan holds a bouquet of poppies near the city of Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Majid Saeedi Getty Images

In case you missed it, June 26 was the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking. Afghanistan, the world's largest provider of opium poppy, did mark the occasion — with a bonfire.

Standing near an 11-ton mountain of seized opium, hashish and alcohol on the outskirts of Kabul, Gen. Baz Mohammad Ahmadi welcomed officials to the drug-burning ceremony.

Ahmadi, the country's deputy minister for counternarcotics, appealed for a strong international effort against narcotrafficking. He also asked for more cooperation from his own government on the issue.

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12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

As Number Of Foreclosed Homes Grows, So Does Mold

As huge numbers of foreclosed homes continue to work their way through the real estate pipeline, another problem is blossoming — mold.

In most homes, as residents go in and out and the seasons change, natural ventilation sucks moisture up to the attic and out through the roof. It's called the "stack effect." And in many parts of the country, it's driven by air conditioning in the summer and heat in the winter.

But no one is going in or out of most foreclosed homes — regardless of climate, and the effects can be devastating.

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