4:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Middle East

Egypt's Military Clashes With Coptic Christians

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 12:22 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Violence in Cairo over the weekend reminds us that Egypt is mostly Muslim but not entirely so. Several million Egyptians are Coptic Christians. And it was members of that minority group who clashed with Egypt's military or the weekend. At least two dozen people are dead, hundreds wounded, the worst violence since Hosni Mubarak was driven from power in February.

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4:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Race

Young Hispanics To Continue Shaping U.S. Landscape

Renee Montagne talks to sociologist Ruben Rumbaut, co-author of a landmark longitudinal study of children of immigrants, about whether young Latinos are truly bicultural.

4:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Economy

Nobel Prize For Economics To Be Announced

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

2:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Upcoming Summit Focuses on Lack of Rural Wireless

With wireless internet almost fact of life, there remain sections of America where residents don’t have fast and easy access to the internet.  The Center for Rural Strategies in Whitesburg next week co-hosts a discussion on how improve broadband internet service in central Appalachia.  Center spokesman Tim Marema says access to digital communication is a modern must.

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2:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Kentuckians at War

"We actually caught 3 young men that were making a bomb"

Fighting a war often immerses a soldier in a foreign environment and culture. That was the case for Phil McKenzie, the latest in a long line of McKenzies who served in the military.  As a 20 year-old Bradley tank driver, the eastern Kentucky native and Tennessee National Guard member, recalls his first impressions of Iraq, its first real election after the American invasion, and the bomb that wasn’t…

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12:01am

Mon October 10, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

Interactive: How Latinos Are Reshaping Communities

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:21 pm

NPR

Over the past decade, the story of population growth in the United States was defined largely by the story of Latinos emerging as the nation's largest minority.

They surpassed African-Americans for that distinction, by accounting for 56 percent of America's growth from 2000 to 2010. They now number more than 50 million. Put another way, 1 in every 6 U.S. residents is Latino.

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12:01am

Mon October 10, 2011
Your Health

Mental First Aid: How To Help In An Emotional Crisis

Nikki Perez wanted to learn how to help others in crisis after recovering from her own mental health disorder.

Kelley Weiss for NPR

When Nikki Perez was in her 20s, she had a job as a lab tech at a hospital in Sacramento, Calif. She said everything was going well until one day, when something changed.

"I worked in a very sterile environment, and so part of the procedure was to wash your hands," she said. "I found myself washing my hands more and more, to the point where they were raw, and sometimes they would bleed."

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12:01am

Mon October 10, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Pharmacies Inject Convenience Into Flu Shot Market

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 1:18 pm

Three years ago, drugstores like Walgreens began training pharmacists to give customers vaccines. Since then, tens of thousands of pharmacists have been certified to give shots.

Francis Ying for Kaiser Health News/NPR

Drugstore and supermarket pharmacies across the country have launched a marketing blitz to attract flu shot customers, touting the convenience of stopping at a local drugstore and often offering drop-in vaccinations anytime the pharmacy is open — sometimes even 24 hours a day.

"If you decided at 4 o'clock in the morning you wanted to go out and had nothing better to do than get a flu shot, you could walk right in and you could get a flu shot," says Scott Gershman, pharmacy manager at a Walgreens drugstore in Springfield, Va.

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12:01am

Mon October 10, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

West Liberty Is Nation's First Majority Hispanic Town

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 3:42 pm

Jose Zacarias lives in an old farmhouse flanked by corn and soybean fields near the edge of town. The Mexican-born immigrant came to West Liberty more than 25 years ago.

Benjamin Roberts

(This report is part of the Morning Edition series "2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.," looking at the ways Latinos are changing — and being changed — by the U.S.)

One place the Hispanic population is growing is in the overwhelmingly white state of Iowa. The latest census figures show the Hispanic population, while only 5 percent of the state, has almost doubled since 2000.

And one small town — West Liberty — is the first in Iowa to have a majority Hispanic population.

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12:01am

Mon October 10, 2011
Asia

In China's Red-Hot Art Market, Fraud Abounds

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 12:22 pm

These two paintings were up for auction in Hong Kong in February. Art auctions produce eye-popping sales figures in China, though critics say there is a widespread problem with fakes.

Vincent Yu AP

As the global economy teeters, one market is still reaching stratospheric highs: Chinese art.

A Hong Kong auction of fine Chinese paintings earlier this month raised $94.8 million, three times pre-sale estimates. In fact, China is now the world's biggest art market, according to the art information agency Artprice.

Yet all is not what it seems in the murky world of Chinese art auctions, including a painting that sold last year for more than $11 million, but appears not to be what was advertised.

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