8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Columns

Steve Jobs, Whose Imagination Invited Us To Play

In this week's essay, host Scott Simon reflects on the life of Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs who died this week.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Politics

Canada-Gulf Pipeline Pits Jobs Against Environment

The State Department is considering whether to issue a permit for a controversial oil pipeline from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Environmentalists oppose the project, but defenders say jobs are at stake. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Economy

Hiring's Up, So Will Obama Keep His Job?

New jobs numbers came out Friday, reporting employers added more than 100,000 workers to their payrolls. That's better than many forecasters were expecting, but not good enough for the 14 million Americans who are still out of work. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on what the numbers tell us about the economy and what they mean for President Obama.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Middle East

Mubarak's Trial No Longer A Symbol Of Justice

Egyptians were glued to their television screens when the trial of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak began late this summer. The trial has lost much of its appeal since then, and not just because it's no longer televised. Merritt Kennedy reports from Cairo.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Animals

A Bird Flies Into A Hurricane. Does It Fly Out?

Many migratory birds travel thousands of miles every year, over land and sea and, sometimes, through hurricanes. Host Scott Simon talks to Dr. Bryan Watts from the College of William and Mary, who used satellite transmitters to track shorebirds as they flew through Hurricane Irene.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Election 2012

Romney Focuses On Security; Voters Weigh His Faith

While people were talking about the religion of former Gov. Mitt Romney at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, Romney was wrapping up a two-day swing through South Carolina. Romney finished fourth in this state's primary in 2008, and his Mormonism was one of the issues seen as holding him back. This time around, there's been less talk about religion and more about policy, but Romney still has a tough row to hoe in this early-voting state. NPR's Ari Shapiro explains why.

8:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
Around the Nation

Marathon Gets Tornado-Hit Town Back On Its Feet

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 12:09 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

In Joplin, Missouri, runners are gearing up for the city's marathon tomorrow. Some local runners say they have a goal to help them carry on, after they lost everything in last May's devastating tornado.

From member station KBIA, reporter Jacob Fenston joined a few runners training for the race.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: Its 5:30 in morning, pitch-black out as a dozen members of the Joplin Road Runners head down Main Street. It's actually the first week the street lights are back on since the tornado struck four months ago.

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7:53am

Sat October 8, 2011
The Impact of War

Now Serving In Uniform, Teacher Seeks To Inspire

Darryl St. George was a high school teacher on Long Island before becoming a Navy corpsman. In June, he was serving in southern Afghanistan. He's back in the U.S. for the time being and has visited his former school.

David Gilkey NPR

Darryl St. George has served his country both in and out of uniform. He left his high school teaching job on Long Island in 2010 to become a U.S. Navy corpsman, a medic for the U.S. Marines.

"I loved teaching. It was a great job, but I felt like something was missing. I kind of — I felt compelled to serve," he told NPR's Tom Bowman in July.

At the time, he was at a dusty combat outpost in southern Afghanistan. St. George had one month left in his deployment to Afghanistan, and said that when he came home, he planned to visit the school where he had taught.

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4:22am

Sat October 8, 2011
Africa

Dalai Lama's Absence Looms Large At Tutu's Birthday

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 10:20 pm

Children help retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu blow out candles on a cake during a celebration of his 80th birthday in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on Friday.

Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

In downtown Cape Town, worshippers gathered Friday for a morning Mass at St. George's Cathedral. During apartheid, the massive stone church was an epicenter of resistance against the South African government. On Friday, a service was held to honor the man who led that resistance, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu.

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12:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
National Security

Veterans, Civilians Don't See Eye To Eye On War

Saturday begins the 11th year in the war in Afghanistan, and a new poll shows that veterans and the general public have different views on war, the value of military service — and even patriotism.

David Gilkey NPR

Veterans and the general public have different views on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the value of military service, and even the subject of patriotism, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

The United States has never seen a moment like this one, the Pew Center says. Sustained combat for a decade, and a small fraction of American men and women in uniform.

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