2:00am

Mon August 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Intolerance Challenges Berea Ideals

Berea residents Adanma and Shane Barton
Ron Smith WEKU News

The small, central Kentucky town of Berea has long had a reputation as a progressive community.  Berea College was among the first southern schools to open its doors to women and African Americans. But as WEKU’S Ron Smith reports, recent intolerance raises questions about the town’s commitment to its ideals.

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5:25pm

Sun July 31, 2011
World

Syrian Government Escalates Crackdown Ahead Of Ramadan

The Syrian government launched a major tank offensive against its own citizens in the city of Hama and an eastern city on Sunday. Activists and western diplomats say the death toll is more than 100 across the country, in what appears to be an all out effort to crush a four month uprising against Syrian President Bashar al Assad. "They were trying to protect the barricades that they had put up to all entrances to the city," NPR's Deborah Amos tells weekends All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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5:25pm

Sun July 31, 2011
Politics

Bond Downgrade Likely Consequence Of Debt Ceiling Increase

Whether Congress reaches a deal to raise the debt ceiling or not, financial markets will still open for business on Monday. Felix Salmon, a blogger for Reuters.com explains the potential reaction to a debt ceiling agreement — or disagreement — on Wall Street. "Once you lose your AAA [rating] it's gone," Salmon says. "Once you get the downgrade it will be downgraded for the next foreseeable future."

5:25pm

Sun July 31, 2011
Politics

Debt Ceiling Talks Drag On

Another day, and still no deal on the debt ceiling crisis. On Saturday, the two sides — or the several sides — seemed to be talking to each other again. On Sunday morning leaders of the Senate began showing signs of movement on a bipartisan deal. But by early evening no deal had been announced. "It has gotten so quiet — too quiet, as they say in the movies," NPR's Don Gonyea, tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "It seems like the White House is focused on the House today...they want to let [Speaker of the House John Boehner] do what he needs to do."

4:59pm

Sun July 31, 2011
Science

Math Can Predict Insurgent Attacks, Physicist Says

Neil Johnson, a University of Miami physicist, developed this mathematical formula to predict insurgent attacks in war zones.
Courtesy of Neil Johnson

The atrocities of war often seem random.

But when it comes to insurgent attacks in Afghanistan or Iraq, that's not exactly the case, says Neil Johnson, a physicist at the University of Miami. Johnson tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about the equation his team has developed that predicts when such attacks will happen.

"We found ... that there was a kind of rhyme and reason behind the numbers," he says. "They weren't just accelerating, they were accelerating in a particular way."

Not So Random

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3:02pm

Sun July 31, 2011
Politics

Former Obama Adviser Brews A Different Tea Party

Van Jones (right) of the American Dream Movement sings during a rally in front of the Capitol on Thursday, urging lawmakers to come to a fair deal on the budget.
Bill O'Leary The Washington Post/Getty Images

Van Jones was President Obama's special adviser for green jobs when he was hit with a wave of criticism from conservative pundits about his past associations. The controversy forced him to leave his post in September 2009, but it wasn't the last we'd hear of him.

That same conservative wave went on to make a major splash in Congress through the Tea Party. Jones decided to fight back, founding a group called the "American Dream Movement."

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2:40pm

Sun July 31, 2011
Technology

A New Way Around Internet Censorship?

Alex Halderman, assistant professor of computer science at the University of Michigan, says the Telex software aims to turn the entire Internet into an anti-censorship device.
istockphoto.com

China is stepping up Internet censorship, telling hotels and cafes they need to monitor public Wi-Fi usage or face fines and punishments.

China is already one of the most heavily censored places in the world — along with places like Burma (Myanmar), Iran and many Middle Eastern countries.

Now, new software being developed at the University of Michigan may help Internet users find away around the blockages. Alex Halderman is an assistant professor of computer science at the university, and one of the developers of the new system, called Telex.

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10:01am

Sun July 31, 2011
Business and the Economy

Coping with Religious Hospital Mergers

Later this month, officials with University of Louisville Hospital, Jewish Hospital and Catholic Health Initiatives will address a General Assembly committee on the hospitals’ pending merger.  The principals were called before state lawmakers over concerns that reproductive and end-of-life services will be changed once the Catholic Health Initiatives owns a majority of the other facilities. CHI will have a 70 percent share of University Hospital and the doctors will follow Catholic health directives.

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9:58am

Sun July 31, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

UK Student Share South African Trip

The University of Kentucky has recently partnered with the nation of South Africa on an academic program titled "Kentucky and South Africa, Different Lands, Common Ground". The collaboration provides an opportunity for UK students to travel and learn more about the people and issues facing the once-segregated country.

International Studies student Corinne Price is back from an internship at the Saartjie Baartman Centre for Women and Children in Cape Town, and she recently shared her experiences with Alan Lytle.

The Saartjie Baartman Centre for Women and Children (SBCWC ) is a one-stop center in Cape Town, South Africa for women and children who are survivors of abuse. Their vision is the creation of a safe and secure society and a human rights culture where women and children are empowered to exercise their full rights.

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9:56am

Sun July 31, 2011
Business and the Economy

Celebrating 50 Years of Candymaking

Jennifer Seagraves, owner of Mom Blakeman's, enjoys Friday's 50th anniversary of the Lancaster candy business.
Clay Jackson The Advocate Messenger

For something that melts rather quickly, Mom Blakeman's Creamed Pull Candy has showed remarkable staying power. "It is really still the best kept secret anywhere," said Pam Williams, who runs the store and the company's day-to-day operations. "It's also one of the most unique candies anywhere." The secret was out Friday as those responsible for maintaining the legacy of Lancaster's buttery smooth signature confection celebrated the product's 50th birthday with a packed party at the current store where the candy is now made and sold.

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