4:59am

Wed August 3, 2011
Middle East

Syrian Uprising Expands Despite Absence Of Leaders

In a photo provided to AFP by a third party, Syrians demonstrate after Friday prayers in the central city of Hama on July 22. Syrian security forces killed at least eight civilians as more than 1.2 million protesters swarmed cities to protest against President Bashar al-Assad's rule, activists said.
- AFP/Getty Images

Syria's uprising has been called the YouTube Revolution. The protest videos from cities across the country are a guide to how the movement works.

The banners and the slogans are remarkably similar, from the city of Dera'a in the south, to Hama on the central plain, to the eastern desert town of Deir Ezzor. Even in the capital of Damascus, the chants are the same: "It's time for President Bashar al-Assad to go."

Read more

4:59am

Wed August 3, 2011
Economy

Deal Averts Default, But Doesn't Fix Debt Problems

The National Debt Clock, a billboard-size digital display showing the increasing U.S. debt, is seen in New York City on Monday. Congress passed a bill Tuesday that would raise the nation's debt limit.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

The bill passed Tuesday to raise the nation's debt limit and avoid default includes as much as $2.4 trillion in deficit reduction over the next decade.

"It's an important first step to ensuring that as a nation we live within our means," President Obama said.

The deal was hard-fought, with cuts some say will be painful, but experts say it doesn't come close to fixing the country's debt problems.

Read more

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
Africa

Militants A Hurdle In Somalia Famine Aid Efforts

Renee Montagne speaks with Kristalina Georgieva about the famine in Somalia and the difficulties of getting aid into the country. Georgieva is the European Union's humanitarian aid commissioner and is just back from Somalia.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

U.S. Auto Market Lags Along With Honda, Toyota Sales

The big three automakers continue to see growth in their recovery but last month sales hit a bit of a bump. The overall U.S. market was dragged down by sluggish sales of Hondas and Toyotas. Companies are still struggling to work out problems with their supply chains following Japan's earthquake and tsunami in March. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Economist In Japan Eyes Effects Of U.S. Debt Debate

Steve Inskeep talks with Richard Koo, chief economist with the Nomura Research Institute, about debt ceilings, deficits and viewing the U.S. debate from Japan.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has this morning's business news.

12:01am

Wed August 3, 2011
Sweetness And Light

NCAA: Still Stalled By 'Amateur Hour' Thinking

NCAA President Mark Emmert address the media during a press conference before the second round of the 2011 NCAA men's basketball tournament at the Verizon Center on March 17 in Washington, D.C.
Nick Laham Getty Images

Next week, at some place in Indianapolis where time has been instructed to stand still, Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA, will convene what is being called, without irony, a "retreat."

Assembled will be about 50 college presidents, pledged, it seems, to make sure that college athletics continue to remain firmly in the past, in the antiquated amateur hours.

Read more

10:31pm

Tue August 2, 2011
National Security

White House Report To Detail Anti-Extremism Effort

The White House will unveil its strategy to counter radicalization on Wednesday afternoon, ending months of speculation about how President Obama intends to tackle the growing problem of violent extremism in this country.

The strategy paper, titled The National Strategy on Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism, has been more than a year in the making and marks the first time the U.S. has laid out a comprehensive strategy to counter violent extremism.

Read more

7:42pm

Tue August 2, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Medicare, Medicaid Advocates Cast Wary Eye On Budget Deal

Medicare and Medicaid have so far dodged the budget knives wielded by the GOP. But those who depend on the programs know that their luck may soon be running out, thanks to the budget deal signed by President Obama on Tuesday.

Read more

6:17pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

After 57 Years, Man Looks To Sell Rare Gehrig Memorabilia

Jeffrey Quick, 69, holds a family photo of his parents and Lou Gehrig's mother as he and his wife, Joan, stand in their dining room. On the table next to them is a glove signed by Gehrig's Yankees teammates — a gift from Christina Gehrig.
Matt Rainey Matt Rainey for NPR

Jeffrey Quick doesn't have any family ties to legendary Yankees ballplayer Lou Gehrig. But his collection of mementos from Gehrig's life — a glove and a grade-school autograph book among them — are the kinds of things passed down from one generation to the next. And that's how Quick got them. Gehrig's mother, Christina, left them to Quick's mother, back in 1954.

As Quick tells All Things Considered co-host Michele Norris, his mother, Ruth Quick, briefly dated Lou Gehrig, back when he was a single superstar in New York.

Read more

Pages