4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Movies

Margin Call Review

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: The global financial crisis of 2008 has a lot of dramatic potential. It propelled the Oscar-winning documentary "Inside Job" and HBO's movie "Too Big To Fail." Now comes "Margin Call," in theaters this weekend. Kenneth Turan has a review.

KENNETH TURAN: "Margin Call" brings us into the inner sanctum of a top Wall Street investment banking firm in peril. The film opens on what everyone in the firm thinks – erroneously, as it turns out - will be the worst part of their day. A team from human resources arrives intent on terminating folks.

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4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Animals

Zanesville Animal Tragedy Echoes 'Ridge' Plot

The events in Ohio involving the release of dozens of exotic animals eerily parallel parts of Michael Koryta's latest book: The Ridge. Koryta talks to Ari Shapiro about the challenges of regulating exotic animal ownership.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi May Be Dead But His Presence Lives On

For the latest from Libya, Ari Shapiro talks to Vivienne Walt, a correspondent for "Time Magazine," who's based in Tripoli.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

Arab World Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 7:32 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

Libyans awoke, this morning, to a new dawn, a nation no longer in the grip of a dictator. Moammar Gadhafi was killed yesterday, after being captured in his hometown of Sirte, where fierce fighting had raged for weeks between his loyalists and anti-Gadhafi forces.

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4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

The MTV reality show The Real World posted an ad on Craigslist earlier this week seeking Occupy Wall Street protesters as cast members. The news blog "Talking Points Memo" picked up on the posting, and called the production company to confirm. An executive there said the protest is "something that's in the zeitgeist of young people."

12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
StoryCorps

Life As A 'Symbol Of Integration' In College

A.P. Tureaud Jr. (right) talked with Steven Walkley at StoryCorps in New York.

StoryCorps

In 1953, A.P. Tureaud Jr. enrolled as a freshman at Louisiana State University, becoming the school's first and only black undergraduate that year. His family had filed a lawsuit on his behalf, after his first application to the school was rejected because of his race. And, as Tureaud remembers, life on the campus in Baton Rouge was a challenge.

Tureaud, 75, talked about the experience with his friend, Steven Walkley, 62.

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12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Franz Liszt At 200: An Important, But Not Great, Composer

Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt wrote incredibly difficult music, music that only he was capable of playing.

Hulton Archive

Tomorrow is the 200th birthday of composer and pianist Franz Liszt. Morning Edition's music commentator Miles Hoffman thinks there are plenty of reasons to celebrate.

"This is a man who lived an extraordinarily long and an extraordinarily productive life — a very complicated life," Hoffman says "By many accounts he was the greatest pianist of the 19th century, somebody who revolutionized people's ideas of what was possible on the piano."

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12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
National Security

Does Libya Offer Clues To An Obama Doctrine?

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 8:08 am

President Obama speaks in the White House Rose Garden to discuss the death of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

President Obama said Moammar Gadhafi's death marks the end of a long and painful chapter for the Libyan people. The seven-month military campaign that toppled the Libyan leader also marks a high point for the kind of international cooperation that Obama has championed.

The White House was careful Thursday not to claim vindication for the president's policies, but the Libyan exercise does offer an example of what an "Obama Doctrine" might look like.

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12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
Middle East

Prominent Syrian Activist Flees, Reveals Identity

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 10:30 pm

At his home in Syria, activist Rami Jarrah, 28, spoke out under the alias Alexander Page. Fearing arrest, he recently fled to Egypt.

Courtesy of Rami Jarrah

The Syrian government has barred most international journalists from the country, restricting coverage since an uprising began last spring. In response, Syrian activists have played a crucial role in providing information to the wider world.

One of the most prominent is Alexander Page — an alias that a young Syrian used for his safety. He was often cited by international media outlets, including NPR.

But he recently fled Syria after his identity was compromised and he was in danger of arrest.

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12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
Research News

'Living Fossils' Just A Branch On Cycad Family Tree

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 8:46 am

A giant dioon, seen at the United States Botanic Garden, is part of the cycad family and can be found growing in Mexico and Central America.

Maggie Starbard NPR

Although dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago, there are still thought to be a few species left over from those days. Plants called cycads are among these rare "living fossils" — they have remained pretty much unchanged for more than 300 million years, but a study in Science magazine suggests that glamorous title may not be deserved.

There's no time machine in Washington, D.C., but Harvard botanist Sarah Mathews leads me to what's arguably the next best thing — a room made of glass in the U.S. Botanic Garden, just downhill from the U.S. Capitol.

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