10:04am

Sun August 7, 2011
All Politics are Local

Fancy Farm Turns Up the Heat in Campaigns

Gov. Steve Beshear on Saturday at the Fancy Farm Picnic spoke about his trip to the Middle East and drew the ire of his opponents, who criticized the governor for not talking about state issues. Beshear on Friday returned to Kentucky after he toured U.S. military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan for the past week. He devoted his entire five-minute speech before the thousands assembled in Graves County to his experience in the past week overseas and praising the U.S. troops.

Diane Roberts is a commentator on Weekend Edition Sunday. An eighth-generation Floridian, she is Professor of English at Florida State University in Tallahassee, where she pulls weeds in the spring and attends FSU football games in the fall. She went to Oxford University courtesy of a Marshall Scholarship in 1980 and earned a bachelor's degree in English literature and a doctorate in American literature.

9:07am

Sun August 7, 2011
World

Nuclear Power Criticized On Hiroshima Anniversary

Saturday, Japan commemorated the 66th anniversary of the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima, but the ceremony was different this year.

In March, a massive earthquake triggered a meltdown at the Japanese nuclear plant in Fukushima. The plant continues to leak radiation in the worst atomic accident since Chernobyl. Saturday's ceremony focused on the nuclear attack on Japan in 1945, but the country's ongoing nuclear disaster loomed large.

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8:22am

Sun August 7, 2011
U.S.

Illegal Border Crossings Fewer But Just As Deadly

This border patrol rescue beacon is in the desert about 15 miles north of the Mexican border southwest of Tucson. Anyone in need can push the button for an emergency response. The instructions are in English, Spanish and the local Native American language.
Ted Robbins NPR

Over the last decade, the U.S. government has spent billions beefing up surveillance, manpower and fencing along the border with Mexico. Fewer people are attempting to cross, but hundreds of migrants still die every year, and not a day goes by without a rescue by border patrol agents.

Officials and humanitarian groups are ramping up efforts to find illegal crossers before the worst happens, and they're hoping new deterrents convince people not to cross in the first place.

Catching The Crossers

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8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
Around the Nation

Urban Rangers Quest For The Natural L.A.

The Los Angeles Urban Rangers are an art collective set on teaching Angelenos how to view nature in their everyday surroundings. Guest host John Ydstie travels with the Rangers on their newest expedition: to explore the L.A. River, a neglected natural resource.

8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
Around the Nation

In Tuscaloosa, A Commencement Comes A Year Late

This weekend, the University of Alabama will award degrees to students who would have received them last spring had a devastating tornado not postponed graduation. During ceremonies, the school will honor the six students killed in the storm. NPR's Kathy Lohr reports.

8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
Afghanistan

Navy SEALs Mourn Heavy Loss In Afghanistan

The Navy SEAL community is mourning the loss of more than two dozen members. They were among 30 Americans killed Saturday when their helicopter came under fire during an operation in eastern Afghanistan. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman reports.

8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
World

After The Downgrade, Eyes Turn To Monday's Markets

Europe is reacting to Friday's downgrade of U.S. credit by Standard & Poor's. NPR's Tom Gjelten reports from Madrid as markets prepare to open around the world.

8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
A Blog Supreme

A Millennial Incursion At Newport

Trombone Shorty, with Dan Oestreicher on baritone saxophone in the background, performing at the Newport Jazz Festival on Saturday.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

The New Black Eagle Jazz Band is about as traditional as they come. The musicians have been playing together for 40 years. And they opened this year's Newport Jazz Festival with rousing, old-time New Orleans polyphony, a style that dates back to the teens and 1920s.

At the same moment, a mere 300 feet away on another stage at Fort Adams, is a band of twenty- and thirty-somethings on the opposite end of the musical spectrum. It's called Mostly Other People Do the Killing.

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8:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
Politics

White House Scorns S&P Downgrade

When Standard & Poor's downgraded the U.S. government's credit rating, the Treasury Department and White House responded swiftly with criticism. Guest host John Ydstie talks with NPR's National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea about that response.

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