12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Animals

How A Clever Virus Kills A Very Hungry Caterpillar

A healthy gypsy moth caterpillar on a leaf. Outbreaks of gypsy moths damage roughly 1 million acres of forest in the U.S. each year.
Michael Grove Science/AAAS

Scientists say they have figured out how a very clever virus outwits a very hungry caterpillar.

The caterpillar is the gypsy moth in its larval stage, and the invasive species damages roughly a million acres of forest in the U.S. each year by devouring tree leaves.

But the damage would be greater if it weren't for something called a baculovirus that can infect these caterpillars and cause them to engage in reckless, even suicidal behavior, scientists say. The virus is so effective that the government actually sprays it on trees to help control gypsy moth outbreaks.

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12:01am

Mon September 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Miss. Port Expansion Raises Concern, Hope For Jobs

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 1:39 pm

Anthony and Eunice Crane stand in their backyard in Gulfport, Miss. The new port access road will be built behind their fence. Their home used to back to other homes.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

It's been six years since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, and the rebuilding continues. In Mississippi, the largest project under construction is the Port of Gulfport. Some $500 million in statewide recovery funds are being used to rebuild the port. The state calls it a critical resource, but some residents hit hard by Katrina fear they won't see the benefits.

The Port of Gulfport sits just off Highway 90, a main road that runs all along the coast. Katrina's 30-foot storm surge nearly destroyed this facility, which is the size of about 50 city blocks.

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7:39pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

PHOTOS: Commemorating Sept. 11 In Afghanistan

U.S. soldiers pray during the an anniversary ceremony of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.
John Moore Getty Images

It's been said many times, today: that one of Sept. 11's most significant legacy are the two wars still being fought the by the United States. Perhaps, that's why this set of pictures feels so important. It shows American service members commemorating the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 in simple terms: raising an American flag or bowing in prayer:

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6:00pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Kids and Sept. 11: The Day 'Children Realized ... Grownups Were Vulnerable'

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 7:38 am

Keri McMorrow, 7, visits the memorial pool where her uncle's name is engraved, during tenth anniversary ceremonies of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center site.
Pool Getty Images

It seems there are two types of stories about how children who experienced Sept. 11: First, of course, there are the stories about the children who lost parents on that day, and then there are those who are too young to remember what life was like before the attacks.

NPR's Zoe Chace talked to some of those kids in New York. She filed this report:

Kate Bralauer is 11. She's from Manhattan, she's never seen the skyline with the towers in it. But 9/11 matters to her.

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5:02pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Fighter Jets Scrambled To Escort American Airlines Flight To New York City

NORAD scrambled two F-16 fighter jets to escort an American Airlines flight traveling from Los Angeles to New York, today, after three passengers locked themselves in a bathroom and refused to come out.

The AP reports:

Flight 34 landed safely after 4 p.m. Sunday. The nature of the incident was unclear but a law enforcement official says it isn't thought to be terrorism.

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3:47pm

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

How Aaron Brown Became CNN's Voice Of Sept. 11

Aaron Brown reported for 17 straight hours on Sept. 11, 2001.
Courtesy of YouTube

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Aaron Brown came into work at CNN still preparing for his new role as the anchor of the network's flagship evening broadcast. He wasn't supposed to go on air for several more weeks, but on that morning and in the days that followed, Brown became the guide for millions of viewers glued to their television sets.

As he scurried to the roof of CNN's headquarters in New York shortly after the towers were hit, Brown remembers stopping in the middle of 8th Avenue and telling himself to stay calm.

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3:37pm

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Reporter Recalls 'Reckless Courage' At Ground Zero

A worker looks over the field of debris of the collapsed south tower area of the World Trade Center in March 2002 in New York City. Many workers chose not to wear the respirators provided for them, except in the most extreme conditions. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt Getty Images

It took journalist and author William Langewiesche several days to get to ground zero after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The airports were closed, and he lived in California.

But as soon as he arrived, he and his editors at the Atlantic Monthly began frantically trying to gain access to the highly restricted site where the Twin Towers had stood.

Langewiesche contacted the head of an obscure city agency, the Department of Design and Construction, Kenneth Holden.

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3:20pm

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Ashcroft: War On Terror Won 'One Day At A Time'

Former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft speaks at the Heritage Foundation in 2010 in Washington, DC. Ashcroft spoke about the U.S. Supreme Court's second opportunity to review the rights of Guantanamo detainees.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

John Ashcroft's term as attorney general under George W. Bush was redefined by Sept. 11.

And he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that the techniques endorsed by his Justice Department were necessary, from warrantless wiretaps to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques."

Defending The Patriot Act

One of Ashcroft's most controversial legacies is the Patriot Act, a piece of legislation that dramatically expanded the surveillance capabilities of law enforcement for monitoring terrorism suspects.

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3:19pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Honoring The Four-Legged Heroes

Susannah George NPR

NPR's Joel Rose was in New Jersey today, where he stumbled upon another Sept. 11 tribute:

A different breed of heroes from September 11th gathered across the Hudson River from Ground Zero. Dozens of service and therapy dogs from around the country gathered with their handlers at Liberty State Park. The event, billed as "Finding One Another," was intended to celebrate the contributions of search and rescue dogs on 9/11 and since.

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2:15pm

Sun September 11, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEOS: Reading Of The Names, Remembering Those Lost

Originally published on Mon September 12, 2011 7:39 am

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