6:00am

Mon December 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Milwaukee VA Cuts In-Patient Stays

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 7:16 am

The VA hospital in Milwaukee is shortening its residential mental health treatment programs. Doctors there say the shortened stay — from 90 to 45 days — will mean more intense treatment and will make it easier for veterans to transition back into society sooner. Some patients worry about being pushed out too soon.

5:26am

Mon December 26, 2011
Sports

NBA Stars Didn't Disappoint In Season Openers

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 7:16 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Perhaps more than any other major professional sports league in this country, the National Basketball Association is star-driven. And yesterday, the stars did not disappoint. A Christmas slate of season-opening games featured the electric play of the league's Most Valuable Player, Derrick Rose, and the NBA's top scorer, Kevin Durant, and this guy named LeBron James as well. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman monitored as much as he could of 13 hours of NBA action. And he joins me now.

Good morning, Tom.

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5:18am

Mon December 26, 2011
Europe

Russians Keep Up Protests For Free Elections

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 7:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:20am

Mon December 26, 2011
Children's Health

Philadelphia Practice Flight Helps Autistic Kids Fly

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 7:16 am

People travelling through Philadelphia International Airport Terminal A West Transit Corridor. The airport is the 12th busiest in the world.
iStockphoto

Air travel horror stories typically involve lost luggage, missed connections and overzealous security staff. But families affected by autism face other challenges in navigating airports and planes.

A Philadelphia program is bringing families, airport employees and airlines together to help autistic kids fly more comfortably.

Airports are loud, hectic places: blaring announcements, glaring lights and long lines can spell trouble for people with autism. They often can't tolerate noise, bright lights and close quarters.

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4:00am

Mon December 26, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep and Linda Wertheimer have business news.

4:00am

Mon December 26, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in Business.

4:00am

Mon December 26, 2011
Business

The Top Gadgets Of 2011

Linda Wertheimer talks to Rich Jaroslovsky, tech columnist for Bloomberg News, about his top gadget picks for 2011.

12:01am

Mon December 26, 2011
It Was A Good Year For...

For Novak Djokovic, A Year To Celebrate In Tennis

In 2011, Novak Djokovic had just about the best year a male tennis player has ever had, including wins at three of the four Grand Slam tournaments.

"This is the athlete of the year," says Jon Wertheim of Sports Illustrated. "This is a brutal, brutal sport. This guy is playing on six continents, every surface....This is one of the all time great years in open tennis history."

This year, Djokovic also kept to a gluten-free diet. Must have been particularly difficult since his family's business is a pizza parlor.

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12:01am

Mon December 26, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Singing Therapy Helps Stroke Patients Speak Again

Originally published on Tue December 27, 2011 10:39 am

Laurel Fontaine, 16, (left) and her twin sister Heather. When Laurel was 11 years old, she suffered a stroke that destroyed 80 percent of the left side of her brain. The singing therapy helped her regain the ability to speak.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Debra Meyerson was hiking near Lake Tahoe 15 months ago when a stroke destroyed part of the left side of her brain, leaving her literally speechless. It happens to more than 150,000 Americans a year.

But now Meyerson is learning to talk again through an approach that trains the undamaged right side of her brain to "speak." Specifically, it's a region that controls singing.

For more than 100 years, it's been known that people who can't speak after injury to the speech centers on the left side of the brain can sing.

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12:01am

Mon December 26, 2011
Sports

Horse Breeders Seek To Rein In Bets On Barrel Races

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 7:16 am

Barrel racing champion Charmayne James rides during a demonstration at a new arena in Gretna, Fla., that plans to hold wagering on the sport.
Brendan Farrington AP

At rodeos, barrel racing has long been a popular event. Riders, often young women, race their horses in a cloverleaf pattern around barrels in an arena. Using quarter horses, the sport has grown in popularity in recent years and has its own circuit of races and competitive riders.

But in Gretna, Fla., a plan to turn barrel racing into a betting proposition has run into opposition. Quarter horse breeders and trainers are suing to stop it, saying the new event could destroy their industry.

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