5:00am

Fri October 28, 2011
Asia

In India, Once-Marginalized Now Memorialized

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 8:48 am

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Stone elephants line a newly inaugurated park dedicated to Dalit, or lower caste, leaders in a suburb of New Delhi, India. Mayawati, a politician known as the "Dalit queen," says previous governments did nothing to honor the leaders who fought for Dalit rights.

Pankaj Nangia AP

In India, a land of ancient monuments, people are talking about a newly built monument for the nation's most marginalized people.

It's a memorial to India's Dalits, the people once called "untouchables," and it was built by the country's most powerful Dalit politician.

The Indian monument best known to Westerners is the Taj Mahal, but the country is bejeweled with magnificent temples and palaces, built by whoever happened to be ruling India at any given time.

This latest monument continues that tradition: It's a colossal domed building carved from pink sandstone.

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4:43am

Fri October 28, 2011
Herman Cain

Herman Cain's Ads Unconventional If Not Effective

A screen grab from Herman Cain's campaign ad.

YouTube

4:34am

Fri October 28, 2011
Economy

The Rising Cost Of Doing Business With Greece

Greek's economic problems work their way down the supply chain to people like Kosta Bouyoukas, who imports olives and other foods from Greece. He says suppliers are changing the terms of contracts, and sometimes products don't show up at all.

Helga Csenki iStockphoto.com

As details of the Greek debt deal passed by the European Union Wednesday are worked out, some businesses in the U.S. continue to grapple with the ripple effects of the prolonged debt crisis.

The EU hopes the debt deal will contain Europe's debt problems, and the problem countries will now start their work of implementing fiscal reforms — which has proved troublesome, especially in Greece.

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4:20am

Fri October 28, 2011
Politics

New York Wrestles Over Extending Millionaires Tax

The so-called millionaires tax on New York's top wage earners is set to expire at the end of the year, even as the state struggles to balance its books. A poll released Thursday shows that New Yorkers favor extending the tax by more than 2 to 1.

But the millionaires tax also has its opponents, including the state's popular and powerful governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo.

John Samuelsen, president of New York City's transit workers union, called on lawmakers to extend the millionaires tax during a rally this week outside City Hall in Manhattan.

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4:00am

Fri October 28, 2011
U.S.

Occupy Violence Reignites Criticism Of Oakland Police

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 8:48 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep are away. In Oakland, California, protestors with the Occupy Wall Street movement continue to stand vigil in a downtown plaza in front of City Hall. This week, police fired teargas and bean bags at protestors. The incident is under investigation, and NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the confrontation has reignited criticism of the Oakland police.

CARRIE KAHN: In the downtown park in front of City Hall, the protestors have changed their tune.

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4:00am

Fri October 28, 2011
Europe

Sarkozy Warns France Of More Belt-Tightening Ahead

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 8:48 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: And, of course, this crisis stretches far beyond Greece. French President Nicolas Sarkozy went on national television last night to explain his country's part of the deal. He said the French people must expect further belt-tightening measures. Eleanor Beardsley reports that it was a chance for Sarkozy to assert control just six months ahead of a presidential election.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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4:00am

Fri October 28, 2011
World

Global Markets Rally After EU Leaders Set Debt Plan

U.S. stocks had one of their best days in weeks Thursday: The Dow jumped nearly 3 percent and prices in Europe went through the roof. The surge came after the announcement that European leaders finally agreed on a comprehensive plan to tackle their debt problems. Does the rally mean investors think the crisis is over?

10:47pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Movie Interviews

For 'Anonymous' Scribe, A Shakespearean Speculation

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Strange, even as fiction: Rhys Ifans (right, with Vanessa Redgrave) plays the 17th Earl of Oxford in Anonymous, a political melodrama inspired by a discredited theory about who "really" wrote the plays of Shakespeare.

Reiner Bajo Columbia Pictures

"What if" — two words that ignite the plot of Roland Emmerich's new movie Anonymous, which conjures up an Elizabethan England rife with dark motivations, political maneuverings and bold conspiracy, and dares to imagine a different identity for the world's most celebrated playwright. John Orloff wrote the screenplay for the movie, which starts with the premise that Shakespeare didn't write Shakespeare.

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10:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
StoryCorps

A Stone Carver's Daughter Tells Of Mount Rushmore

It took 14 years for stone carvers to create the Mount Rushmore monument, seen here in 1995. Gloria Del Bianco's father, Luigi, led the carving team.

Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

On Halloween 70 years ago, an iconic American monument was completed — Mount Rushmore. It took 14 years of blasting and chiseling granite to finish the work. And chief stone carver Luigi Del Bianco, an Italian immigrant, was there for most of them. Del Bianco was responsible for many of the finer details in Lincoln's face.

Del Bianco's daughter Gloria and her nephew, Lou, recently sat down at StoryCorps to share their memories of him and the work he did. The Mount Rushmore project began in 1927, when Del Bianco was 35. And it ended 14 years later.

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6:25pm

Thu October 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Report: Fukushima Released More Radioactive Material Than Japan Estimated

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 7:18 am

An unpublished study by European scientists has found that the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant may have released much more radioactive active material than the Japanese government estimated.

NPR's Richard Harris filed this report for the Newscast unit:

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