4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Business

Business News

Executives from Japanese camera and medical device maker Olympus admitted Tuesday that the company has been using accounting tricks to cover up losses since the 1990s. The announcement comes after a scandal erupted last month.

4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Law

Jury Finds Dr. Murray Guilty In Pop Star's Death

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This morning, Dr. Conrad Murray is in a jail here in Los Angeles. Michael Jackson's personal physician was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter yesterday. NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates has been following the trial and has this report.

KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, BYLINE: The downtown courtroom was packed as those present waited as the clerk of the court read the jury's verdict.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

South Korean Opposition Delays Free Trade Vote

In South Korea, opposition politicians have delayed the ratification of the Free Trade Agreement with the United States. The U.S. Congress has ratified the pact. But in South Korea, thousands of opponents have been holding angry street rallies, and a rising mood of anti-American sentiment is helping their cause.

4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

Tea Party Looks To Impact Presidential Election

Republican presidential candidates (from left) Jon Huntsman, Herman Cain, Rep. Michele Bachmann, Mitt Romney, Gov. Rick Perry, Rep. Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum prepare to debate during the event sponsored by CNN and the Tea Party Express at the Florida state fairgrounds on Sept. 12 in Tampa.
Win McNamee Getty Images

It was one year ago that the Tea Party movement helped Republicans take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. With the presidential election a year away, the movement finds itself searching for ways to have the same kind of impact this time around.

The Tea Party celebrated on election night last year with candidates like Rand Paul, who captured a Senate seat in Kentucky.

"Tonight there's a Tea Party tidal wave, and we're sending a message to them," Paul said in his victory speech.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

4th Woman Accuses Cain Of Sexual Harassment

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

When a Chicago woman came out yesterday to publicly accuse Herman Cain of an unwanted sexual advance, it marked a shift in this story. Up to that point, the three previous accusations had been anonymous. The Republican presidential candidate has firmly denied all the accusations of harassment, including yesterday's, which the woman claimed had occurred in 1997, when Cain was head of the National Restaurant Association.

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3:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Space

The Plutonium Problem: Who Pays For Space Fuel?

NASA's next Mars rover, Curiosity, seen in this artist's rendering, will use 8 pounds of plutonium-238 as its power supply. That's a significant portion of the remaining space fuel. NASA and the Department of Energy have offered to split the costs of producing the fuel, but Congress has so far opposed that arrangement.
NASA

When NASA's next Mars rover blasts off later this month, the car-sized robot will carry with it nearly eight pounds of a special kind of plutonium fuel that's in short supply.

NASA has relied on that fuel, called plutonium-238, to power robotic missions for five decades.

But with supplies running low, scientists who want the government to make more are finding that it sometimes seems easier to chart a course across the solar system than to navigate the budget process inside Washington, D.C.

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12:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Europe

In Spain, Low Wages Become Increasingly Common

David Horcajada fishes a beer can out of his backpack at a Madrid square.

"Five years ago, believe me, there were really few people drinking on the streets," he says. "Right now, everybody is drinking on the street because people cannot afford to pay for drinks at bars. So since we're Spanish and we do drink, we party a lot, so it doesn't matter if we don't have money. We'll keep doing it."

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12:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Fine Art

Wal-Mart Heiress Brings Art Museum To The Ozarks

A model shows a view of the Crystal Bridges pavilion some museum staff refer to as "the armadillo" because of how its curved, copper bands resemble the animal's shell.
John Horner Crystal Bridges Museum of Art

The American art world's biggest event in decades is happening this week — but it's not where you'd expect it to be.

Bentonville, Ark. is home to Wal-Mart headquarters and, starting Nov. 11, it will also be home to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and what some critics are calling one of the world's best collections of American art.

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12:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Sports

Some Local Businesses Hurting Without NBA Assist

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 9:22 am

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant (left) and Miami Heat forward LeBron James warm up before an NBA charity basketball invitational game in Oklahoma City on Oct. 23. The NBA had a series of exhibition games to keep players in the spotlight during the lockout. The lockout is hurting local businesses and arena employees in Oklahoma City.
Sue Ogrocki AP

From Los Angeles to New York City and Miami to Dallas, professional basketball fans face November without the NBA. The league keeps canceling games because of the ongoing lockout as players and owners squabble over future contracts.

Most NBA cities have other professional sports to turn to with hoops on hiatus. But some markets, like downtown Oklahoma City, only have one game in town.

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12:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Law

Do Police Need Warrants For GPS Tracking Devices?

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 11:52 am

The Supreme Court considers whether GPS monitoring devices like this one may be affixed to suspects' cars without a warrant from a judge.
Yasir Afifi AP

The U.S. Supreme Court, an institution steeped in tradition, steps into the turbulent world of new technology Tuesday. At issue before the court is whether police must get a warrant from a judge before they can attach a GPS tracking device to a car so they can monitor a suspect's every movement for an indefinite period of time.

The case could have enormous implications for privacy rights in the information age.

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