12:01am

Mon January 30, 2012
Author Interviews

'Consent' Asks: Who Owns The Internet?

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 1:29 pm

Rebecca MacKinnon is a Bernard Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation. She lives in Washington, D.C.
Brooke Bready

While the Internet may aid the spread of democracy, democracy doesn't necessarily mean a free and open Internet. In her new book Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom, Rebecca MacKinnon, senior fellow at the New America Foundation and co-founder of Global Voices, a citizen media network, investigates the corrosion of civil liberties by the governments and corporations that control the digital world.

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12:01am

Mon January 30, 2012
Your Money

Employees To Face 'Term Limits' At Casino

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 8:44 am

The new Revel casino, which sits along the boardwalk in Atlantic City, has drawn criticism for its employment policies.
Emma Jacobs WHYY

A new casino set to open in Atlantic City, N.J., has announced it will set term limits for its front-line staff. When employees' terms run out, they'll have to go through the hiring process again. The casino says the policy will keep its service fresh. Others say the company is taking advantage of a tough job market.

From bellhops to dealers, employees of the new casino — called Revel — will be hired for terms from four to six years. After that, they have to reapply for their jobs and compete against other candidates.

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12:01am

Mon January 30, 2012
Around the Nation

The Clash Over Fingerprinting For Food Stamps

A sign in a New York City market window advertises that it accepts food stamps.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants New York City to stop requiring fingerprinting of its food stamp recipients, a stance that puts him at odds with the city's mayor, who favors the practice.

Cuomo says fingerprinting stigmatizes needy people and stops them from applying for help. In a recent State of the State speech, Cuomo pledged to stop fingerprinting food stamp recipients this year.

But New York City Michael Bloomberg says without fingerprinting, fraud would escalate.

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12:00am

Mon January 30, 2012
State Capitol

Pseudoephedrine Debate Gets Personal

The debate over how to regulate pseudoephedrine is becoming more polarized. Lawmakers are wrestling with the idea of whether to make the drug, known as PSE, available by prescription only. Law enforcement supports that idea, while health care and citizen groups don’t. The debate has led one state Senator to dial back his leadership on the issue due to personal attacks. But Senator Tom Jensen says he’s going to continue to advocate to make PSE prescription only.

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12:00am

Mon January 30, 2012
State Capitol

Congressional Redistricting Progresses

After two weeks of no movement, legislative leaders are hopeful they’ll reach a compromise on Congressional redistricting soon. That hope is the reason they’re giving for extending the filing deadline until February 7th, as the General Assembly did last week. State Senator Damon Thayer says so far, the problem has been wildly different approaches to drawing new maps.

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5:28pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Digital Life

Public Or Private: Keeping Google From Being 'Evil'

A sign for Google is displayed behind the Google android robot, at the National Retail Federation, in New York. The announced changes to Google's privacy policy has drawn both positive and negative attention.
Mark Lennihan AP

Let's start with a quick Google experiment.

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3:00pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Politics

Bilingualism A Political Liability?

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 9:48 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And sticking with presidential politics for a moment, speaking a second language has recently become something of a liability for those aspiring to live in the White House. It turns out very few American presidents have had a strong command of a second language, most of them in the early days of the Republic, and that language, it was French.

John McWhorter wrote about this recently in The New Republic, and he's with me now. John, bonjour.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

JOHN MCWHORTER: Bonjour, Guy. How are you doing?

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3:00pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Politics

Gingrich Attacks Front-Runner Romney

Originally published on Sun January 29, 2012 9:48 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a little more than a day left before voters in Florida have their say in the GOP primary. The latest polls by the Miami Herald and the Tampa Bay Times show Mitt Romney with an 11-point lead over Newt Gingrich, with Rick Santorum and Ron Paul trailing far behind. Newt Gingrich, who's had trouble getting support from establishment Republicans, picked up a nod from a decidedly non-establishment figure - one of his former rivals, Herman Cain.

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3:00pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Africa

Attacks By Nigerian Muslim Group Stirs Fear

A radical Islamist group in northern Nigeria has claimed responsibility for a series of deadly bombing attacks last week that left more than 200 people dead. Boko Haram's campaign of violence has left minority Christians on edge in the city of Kano.

2:32pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Music Interviews

Air: Scoring A Cinematic Marvel, 100 Years Later

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 11:00 pm

Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoit Dunckel pose at a January screening of Le Voyage Dans La Lune at New York's Museum of Modern Art.
Gabi Porter Courtesy of the artist

In 1902, director Georges Melies released his magnum opus: Le Voyage Dans La Lune (A Trip To the Moon), often considered the first science-fiction movie ever. Even if you've never heard of Melies, you've probably seen the film's most famous shot: a moon with a human face, wincing at the spaceship that has just crashed into its eye.

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