4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

Workers Likely To Lose Out In AMR Bankruptcy

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's follow-up now on yesterday's news that American Airlines filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. It's part of an effort to cut debt and reduce labor costs. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports on what a post-bankruptcy American Airlines might look like.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: During the economic downturn, American Airlines already pared down its work force. Analysts don't think there will be massive layoffs this time.

AARON GELLMAN: Many elements of labor are going to pay a terrible price for this.

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4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

British Panel Told Phone-Hacking Was Necessary

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The British government continues investigating the phone-hacking scandal at newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch. More than a dozen journalists and editors have been arrested, top police and media executives have lost their jobs and an official ethics investigation may challenge the whole idea that the British press can regulate itself. And then, a former features editor for one of Murdoch's papers stole the show at a government hearing yesterday.

Here's NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik.

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4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Renee Montagne has business news.

4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

Fair Trade Labeling Dispute

The fair-trade movement, which pays premiums to farmers in developing countries for meeting social and environmental standards, is growing quickly, and contentiously. The nation's largest fair-trade certifying agency has split from its international partner, hoping to expand the program to plantation-grown coffee. Some coffee sellers say the agency is just lowering standards to benefit corporate coffee companies, and consumers will be left confused.

4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

Egyptian Protesters Ponder Their Next Step

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now, let's go to Egypt where days of protests gave way to two days of peaceful and well-attended elections. Now, the protesters, who had been occupying the famous Tahrir Square in Cairo, are wondering what their next steps should be. The crowds dwindled as the voting continued.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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4:00am

Wed November 30, 2011
NPR Story

Secretary Clinton Makes Historic Trip To Myanmar

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Hillary Clinton begins a visit to Myanmar today, the first by a U.S. secretary of state, to that reclusive country, in half a century. Myanmar, long known as Burma, has been notorious for its repressive rule. In recent months, there have been signs of reform. Clinton says she's testing the waters to see how real those changes are.

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3:42am

Wed November 30, 2011
Election 2012

Mitt Romney Courts Florida's Latino Voters

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Four years ago in Florida, Mitt Romney failed to persuade Republicans that he should be the party's nominee for president. He aims to make sure that doesn't happen this time. Romney made two quick campaign stops in that state yesterday. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports he made a special effort to appeal to Florida's Latino voters.

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12:01am

Wed November 30, 2011
Law

Hearing May Lead To More Freedom For Hinckley

John Hinckley Jr. is escorted by police in Washington, D.C., on March 30, 1981, following his arrest after shooting and seriously wounding then-President Ronald Reagan.
AFP/Getty Images

More than 30 years ago, on March 30, 1981, John Hinckley shot President Reagan and three other people outside a Washington hotel. A jury found him not guilty by reason of insanity, and authorities sent him to a mental institution.

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12:01am

Wed November 30, 2011
Hard Times: A Journey Across America

A Steel Town Looks At Its Future, And Sees Rebirth

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:07 pm

The old Granite City Steel Mill is now owned and operated by US Steel.
David Schaper NPR

Part of a monthlong series

The Great Recession has hit the industrial Midwest especially hard in recent years, from big cities to small factory towns. But now, in at least one small Illinois city, local leaders believe the worst is finally behind them.

Sitting across the Mississippi River from downtown St. Louis, Granite City, Ill., has certainly seen better days. In its downtown, there are more boarded-up and empty storefronts and vacant lots than there are businesses.

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12:01am

Wed November 30, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Does Milwaukee's Campaign Against Sleeping With Babies Go Too Far?

Babies sleeping with their parents risk death, according to an ad campaign by the Milwaukee Health Department.
Courtesy of the Milwaukee Health Department

Three infants have died in the past three weeks in Milwaukee because they were sleeping in the same bed as adults, according to officials.

The deaths come on the heels of an aggressive and controversial ad campaign designed to get parents to place their babies in cribs to sleep. Ads on bus shelters in the city show startling images of babies sleeping face down in adult beds next to what's best described as a meat cleaver.

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