11:39am

Sun February 19, 2012
Pop Culture

The Deep-Seated Meaning Of The American Sofa

The sofa can be the epicenter of our lives. It is home base, North Star, study carrel, dining booth and royal throne rolled into one.
Dierk Schaefer Flickr

A tale of two couches: The first, pictured recently in the New York Daily News, is where NBA supernova Jeremy Lin reportedly spent nights — perhaps battling Linsomnia — before erupting into a game-changing beast and leading the New York Knicks to a euphoric win streak.

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11:16am

Sun February 19, 2012
All Politics are Local

Paul’s Stance on Synthetic Drugs

As U.S. Sen. Rand Paul objects to legislation that seeks to ban synthetic drugs on the grounds that drug laws should be state and local issues and federal sentencing guidelines are too harsh, he also cites in a letter to two other senators the proliferation of Islam in the prison system among his arguments against federal measures to ban the substances. In a four-page Dec. 14 letter to U.S. Sens. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, obtained recently by the Daily News, Paul explains that one of the reasons he objects to three Senate bills dealing with synthetic drugs is that sending people to prison could lead to more people turning to the Islamic faith.

11:12am

Sun February 19, 2012
The Commonwealth

Remembering Legislator Virgil Pearman

VIRGIL PEARMAN

Virgil Pearman was best known for his work as a homebuilder and his service in Kentucky’s General Assembly. But those closest to him recalled the late legislator as putting family first. Hours after Pearman died Friday at age 78 at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Joe Pearman remembered his brother as a man who would rather have a grandchild bouncing on his knee than talk to the president. Eventually Pearman went on to serve multiple terms in the state House of Representatives and one term in the state Senate before leaving office in 1993.

11:09am

Sun February 19, 2012
Environmental Watchdog

Winter Storm Will Deliver Snow

An approaching storm will apparently only deliver a glancing blow to Central Kentucky on Sunday while dumping up to several inches of snow over Eastern Kentucky.The National Weather Service office in Jackson has issued a winter storm warning through 9 p.m. Sunday for Eastern Kentucky. Snow will be heavy at times and mixed with sleet during the middle part of the day, the NWS said. Two to 4 inches of snow will fall in the valleys and 3 to 5 inches on higher elevations. And amounts of up to 6 inches are possible in some areas.

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11:06am

Sun February 19, 2012
The Commonwealth

Sherman Minton Bridge Reopens Early

The I-64 Sherman Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Southern Indiana and Louisville reopened to traffic just before midnight Friday. “Thanks to the workers, contractors, and the people of INDOT, the Sherman Minton Bridge is back in operation, 12 days ahead of the target date. We’ve never been happier to pay a contractor incentive dollars for an ahead-of-schedule performance.And thanks also to all the citizens who endured so much inconvenience in order to make 100 percent sure that no one was ever put at risk,” Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels said in a statement.

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8:00am

Sun February 19, 2012
The Salt

Dining After 'Downton Abbey': Why British Food Was So Bad For So Long

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 3:06 pm

"Downton Abbey's" kitchen maid (Sophie McShera) and cook (Lesley Nicol) teach Lady Sybil (Jessica Brown-Findlay) the basics of cooking. Many Edwardian servants had a pretty good handle on advanced cuisines, says food historian Ivan Day.
Courtesy (C) Carnival Film & Television Limited 2011 for Masterpiece

If you've ever watched the television show Downton Abbey, you've probably deduced that dining was a very, very big deal in the lives of the landed gentry of Edwardian England.

Much of the drama surrounding the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants unfolds against a tableau of the table.

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8:00am

Sun February 19, 2012
Around the Nation

Providence Seeks Aid From Ivy League Resident

Originally published on Sun February 19, 2012 10:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Brown University, a private school in Providence, Rhode Island, is being asked to do more for its hometown. The city is almost in the red and the mayor is calling on the tax exempt colleges and hospitals to help out. As Ian Donnis of Rhode Island Public Radio reporters, all of this has triggered some tension between Providence and its Ivy League school.

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8:00am

Sun February 19, 2012
Education

What's Behind The Rise Of College Tuition?

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks to NPR education reporter Claudio Sanchez about the huge rise in public college tuition as states face a budget squeeze.

8:00am

Sun February 19, 2012
Around the Nation

North Vs South: Carolinas Seek To Redraw Border

Originally published on Sun February 19, 2012 10:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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8:00am

Sun February 19, 2012
Kentucky Arts and Culture

No Off Day at Mary Todd Lincoln House

The childhood home of former First Lady, Mary Todd Lincoln, is normally closed all winter long, but the historic house on Main Street in Lexington is making an exception for this Monday; Presidents Day. Executive Director Gwen Thompson says the staff always put together a youth-oriented program for the holiday. "It's really catered more to the children. It's different from our regular tours which really are more adult-friendly, so this is an experience for the kids and to make museums fun for them."

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