1:31pm

Mon February 27, 2012
The Salt

Judge Dismisses Organic Farmers' Case Against Monsanto

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 11:37 am

Farmer Alan Madison fills a seed hopper with Monsanto hybrid seed corn near Arlington, Illinois, U.S. A group of organic and other growers say they're concerned they'll be sued by Monsanto if pollen from seeds like these drift onto their fields.
Daniel Acker Landov

A New York federal court today dismissed a lawsuit against agribusiness giant Monsanto brought by thousands of certified organic farmers. The farmers hoped the suit would protect them against infringing on the company's crop patents in the future.

The Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association and several other growers and organizations do not use Monsanto seeds. But they were betting that the judge would agree that Monsanto should not be allowed to sue them if pollen from the company's patented crops happened to drift into their fields.

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1:18pm

Mon February 27, 2012
The Two-Way

TransCanada To Begin Work On One Portion Of Keystone Pipeline

After a proposal to build an oil pipeline from Canada to Texas was denied by the Obama administration, TransCanada says it will start building the Oklahoma-to-Texas portion of the Keystone XL pipeline.

If you remember back in January, the administration told TransCanada to reapply for a permit on the 1,700 mile pipeline when it had plans to avoid the environmentally sensitive Sandhills of Nebraska.

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12:35pm

Mon February 27, 2012
The Commonwealth

Warm Winter in Play

This winter’s unseasonably warm conditions could provide ripe conditions for vegetation, some wanted and some unwanted.  The average temperature across Kentucky from December until now stands just under 40 degrees.  That makes this winter the tenth warmest on record.  The warmest winter was in 1932 when the average temperature almost reached 45 degrees.  As a result, University of Kentucky Agricultural Meteorologist Tom Priddy says gardeners should still expect problems.

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12:28pm

Mon February 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Costa Allegra, Concordia's Sister Ship, Adrift In Indian Ocean

After an engine room fire, the Costa Allegra is adrift in the Indian ocean. The Allegra is owned by Costa Concordia, the same company that owns the cruise ship that ran aground off the coast of Italy and killed 25 people and left seven missing.

The AP reports the Costa Allegra is adrift in the area of the Indian Ocean where Somali pirates have been active.

The Guardian reports:

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12:20pm

Mon February 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Gay Marine's Homecoming Kiss Is Lighting Up The Web

The kiss. That's Sgt. Brandon Morgan on the right. Dalan Wells on the left.
Gay Marines on Facebook

Since the Gay Marines Facebook page posted it on Saturday, a photo of Sgt. Brandon Morgan and his partner Dalan Wells sharing a welcome home kiss in Hawaii has been getting quite a bit of attention:

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12:16pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Book Reviews

China On The Court: NBA Meets The 'Brave Dragons'

iStockPhoto.com

"Linsanity" is the magical byword of this basketball season. As anyone who is even semi-conscious knows, Jeremy Lin, the NBA's first Taiwanese-American player by way of Harvard, was passed over for college athletic scholarships and ignored in NBA drafts. Then, he landed with the New York Knicks and has since proved to everybody that athletic prejudice against Asians is Lincredibly stupid. Except, as journalist Jim Yardley points out in his new book on basketball fever in China, Chinese players and coaches happen to endorse that prejudice.

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11:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Chechens Allegedly Planned To Attack Putin's Motorcade With Mines

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.
Alexey Nikolsky AFP/Getty Images

Chechens who allegedly were hoping to kill Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin planned to hide landmines along a route his motorcade often uses in Moscow, according to Russian TV, the BBC reports.

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9:35am

Mon February 27, 2012

9:33am

Mon February 27, 2012
Education

Federal Money Puts Students in Charge

41 Kentucky high schools will soon be receiving grants, but the money won't be going to teachers or administrators. Students will be deciding how the money is spent. The program is called Students Taking Charge, which is part of Kentucky Action for Healthy Kids. It distributes $500 grants to schools in the hopes that students will take the reins, explore projects that might improve health and nutrition, and use the funds to implement effective changes.

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9:30am

Mon February 27, 2012
Education

A Guide to Presidential Views on Education

This year’s Republican presidential hopefuls have been making their way through Ohio over the past couple weeks looking for votes in the state’s March 6thprimary. The candidates have some unified themes when it comes to education, mostly around cutting back on federal and state spending on public schools and increasing school choice. Currently, the federal government chips in only about 10 percent toward the cost of public education in America. But even that small amount is more than the federal government used to contribute.

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