12:34pm

Tue March 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Lehman Exits Bankruptcy, Set To Pay Creditors

Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., which in 2008 filed for the biggest bankruptcy in U.S. history and whose collapse roiled world markets, says it has exited bankruptcy and will make its first payment to creditors on April 17.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

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12:13pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Business

Lehman Bros. Says It Has Emerged From Bankruptcy

Nearly four years ago, the bank collapsed in the biggest bankruptcy in U.S. history — a record $639 billion. That set off a chain reaction and sent the economy spiraling. Lehman Bros. says now, it will continue to liquidate its holdings, and will start paying back creditors next month.

12:07pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Education

UPike Compromise Builds Momentum

A bill creating a new scholarship fund from coal severance tax monies has cleared a House committee this morning. The scholarships have evolved from an original proposal that would have added the University of Pikeville into the state university system.

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12:05pm

Tue March 6, 2012
State Capitol

Meth Crackdown Bill Wins Another Vote

A proposal that limits the amount of pseudoephedrine consumers can buy in a month could make it out the state House of Representatives intact. The Senate passed a bill last week that would limit consumers to seven point two grams of pseudoephedrine every month, or roughly two boxes of cold medicine.

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12:00pm

Tue March 6, 2012
Sports

Cash For Hits Has Some Calling Foul on NFL

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We are going to spend some time today talking about two issues in the news that are on a lot of people's minds, and they both touch on violence. Later in our parenting segment, we are going to talk about what we really know about why young people turn to deadly violence. We're thinking about this, of course, after that school shooting in Ohio that left three students dead.

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11:49am

Tue March 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Michigan Man Sues Movie Theater Because Of High Price Of Concessions

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 11:59 am

Patrons at AMC Burbank 16 theater in Burbank, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian AP

Few would argue that the prices at movie theater concessions are a bit high: $11 for a Coke and popcorn, $6 for a box of gummy worms. Few would argue that it seems excessive.

As the Hollywood Reporter puts it, it may seem "like highway robbery, but is it actually unlawful?"

Joshua Thompson, a Michigan man in his 20s, is putting that question to the test by filing a class action lawsuit against his local AMC theater alleging the theater is price gouging.

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11:21am

Tue March 6, 2012
State Capitol

House Panel Passes UPike Compromise Plan

A bill creating a new scholarship fund from coal severance tax monies has cleared a House committee Tuesday morning. The scholarships have evolved from an original proposal that would have added the University of Pikeville into the state university system. But the UPIKE proposal didn’t have the votes to pass, so lawmakers settled on a compromise.

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11:18am

Tue March 6, 2012
The Commonwealth

Insurance Claims Pour in From Damage

Volunteers helped clear debris and look for salvageable belongings in what was once a mobile home owned by Aaron Keith. The mobile home was destroyed 2/29/2012 when a suspected tornado moved through Russell County.
Bill Estep/The Herald-Leader

Claims for damage from Friday's round of deadly tornadoes and hailstorms are pouring into Kentucky insurance agents by the thousands. By mid-afternoon Monday, Kentucky Farm Bureau, one of the state's largest property insurers, had received more than 9,000 claims, said Greg Kosse, a spokesman for Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance. "We anticipate those numbers are going to go up significantly," Kosse said.

11:13am

Tue March 6, 2012
Business and the Economy

Bill Tries to Bolster Wine Business

Dennis Walter, who owns StoneBrook Winery, Camp Springs, uses a pneumatic corking machine to set corks in bottles of pear wine. A bill filed by Rep. Dennis Keene would provide for separate liquor licenses.
Patrick Reddy/The Kentucky Enquirer

Dan Bryan wanted to open a wine bar but the cost shocked him. Just to get a liquor license could cost more than $25,000. That’s why Bryan and local leaders support a bill introduced by State Rep. Dennis Keene, D-Wilder, that would create a separate liquor license to sell wine by the drink and by the package in wine bars. Winemakers hope this will lead to more bars devoted to wine, particularly Kentucky wine. The state’s wine industry has grown in the past 15 years from four wineries to 65 across the state.

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