8:00am

Sat March 24, 2012
Presidential Race

GOP Primary Season: Helpful Or Harmfully Long?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Be careful what you wish for. After John McCain so quickly clinched the Republican presidential nomination the last time around, the party changed its rules with an eye to extending their primary season, reaping public interest for months like the long Democratic primary season of 2008. You might wonder how they feel about that now. John McCain himself has dubbed this campaign the nastiest he's ever seen - akin to watching a Greek tragedy.

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8:00am

Sat March 24, 2012
NPR Story

New Prosecutor In Fla. Shooting Case; Protests Spread

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Outrage over the shooting death of Trayvon Martin spread across the country this week following the release of the recordings of 911 calls. Trayvon Martin was unarmed. He'd gone out to purchase candy. Thousands of people protested this week, donning hooded sweatshirts in solidarity with Trayvon Martin, who was wearing one when he was shot. Many called for the arrest of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who says he shot the 17-year-old in self-defense.

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8:00am

Sat March 24, 2012
NPR Story

'Unfinished Revolutions' Churn In Middle East

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 10:41 am

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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8:00am

Sat March 24, 2012
NPR Story

Obama's The Topic, Louisiana Is GOP's Next Goal

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 10:41 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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6:58am

Sat March 24, 2012
The Salt

Cooking School Spreads Immigrants' Skills And Ethnic Recipes

Linh Nguyen teaches the traditional Vietnamese recipes she learned from her mother and aunts to students at a Culture Kitchen class.
Deena Prichep for NPR

If you want to learn how to make Vietnamese egg rolls, you can always check out a cookbook, a food blog, or perhaps a site like Epicurious.

But Linh Nguyen — who is teaching a cooking class here in San Francisco — says that that's not really the way to do it. In fact, her family doesn't even own a cookbook.

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6:03am

Sat March 24, 2012
Performing Arts

Basil Twist: A Genius, With Many A String Attached

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:56 am

Puppeteer Basil Twist poses with Ballerina, the marionette at the center of a tragic love triangle in his adaptation of Petrushka.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Basil Twist has been called a genius. The art he's a genius at? Puppetry — which he knows can be a hard sell.

"It's not of this time," he says. "It's not of the world we live in now."

But Twist, a highly trained practitioner, brings this art of the past to the present with innovative creations beyond the likes of the Muppets or their foul-mouthed cousins on Avenue Q.

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6:00am

Sat March 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Americans Want The Supreme Court To Open Up; Here's Why It Won't

The U.S. Supreme Court.
J. Scott Applewhite AP
  • Nina Totenberg on the court's disconnect
  • Nina Totenberg, on the timing of the tapes
  • Nina Totenberg, on the justices' thinking
  • Nina Totenberg, on looking forward to the sessions

Three straight days of oral arguments about the constitutionality of President Obama's health care overhaul law start Monday at the U.S. Supreme Court.

It's a perfect political storm: an issue that affects everyone and has deeply divided the major political parties coming before the nine justices smack in the middle of a presidential campaign.

Much is riding on what the justices decide. Their rulings are expected by the end of June.

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5:57am

Sat March 24, 2012
Author Interviews

'The Big Con': If You Can't Avoid It, Avenge It

promo image
istockphoto.com

Americans have always been fascinated by con men. Why else would we have so many movies about legendary swindlers? Most real-life cons are probably less entertaining than the ones on the silver screen, but in her new book, Amy Reading unearths a historical swindle that rivals anything ever imagined by Hollywood.

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5:57am

Sat March 24, 2012
Around the Nation

A Lesson In Sprockets Takes Students On A Trip

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 10:41 am

Daniel Furbish works with a student during his class in Nashville, Tenn. Students learn to build bikes from donated parts.
Kim Green For NPR

In a cave-like basement bursting with rickety old bicycles, tires and churning middle-schoolers, Daniel Furbish barks orders.

Close-cropped beard, pen behind his ear, Furbish is an artist-turned-teacher from a military family — creative and disciplined. He started his Nashville, Tenn., bike-building workshop as a summer experiment. He thought, "What if I take donated bike parts and teach kids to put them together?"

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