6:04am

Sun March 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Sunshine State Bets On Sunset For Health Care Act

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 11:26 am

Louisa McQueeney manages a small business in Lantana, Fla., shipping gift food and produce. She believes the new health care law could bring down her employee health care costs, but Florida Gov. Rick Scott disagrees, and he's leading the battle to strike down the law in court.
Greg Allen NPR

No state has worked harder to stop the federal health care overhaul than Florida. Hours after President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law two years ago, Florida led 12 other states in a federal court challenge. Eventually, a total of 26 states signed on.

The Supreme Court will hear the case this week. Meanwhile, Florida's governor, Rick Scott, has rejected more than $35 million in federal grants to help the state prepare for the new federal program.

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6:03am

Sun March 25, 2012
Judging The Health Care Law

In Health Case, Combustible Mix Of Politics And Law

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 8:33 am

The Supreme Court will hear arguments this week over President Obama's health care overhaul.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to begin hearing oral arguments Monday in a Republican-led challenge to the national health care law that has convulsed the country and its political class for more than two years — and may well define President Obama's tenure in the White House.

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6:03am

Sun March 25, 2012
Judging The Health Care Law

A Legal Guide To The Health Care Arguments

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 10:23 am

On Monday, the court considers whether it can even hear the health care case now.

As the Supreme Court prepares to hear oral arguments over President Obama's health care overhaul this week, we take a look at the questions at stake each day.

Monday: Can the courts even rule on the constitutionality of the law right now?

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10:26pm

Sat March 24, 2012
State Capitol

2012 General Assembly topic of Kentucky Tonight

On this week's edition of Kentucky Tonight,  host Bill Goodman and guests will discuss the 2012 General Assembly.

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8:32pm

Sat March 24, 2012
U.S.

Former VP Cheney Undergoes Heart Transplant

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 11:32 pm

Dick Cheney, 71, was in a Virginia hospital following a heart transplant Saturday. Host Laura Sullivan talks with NPR's Rob Stein about the former vice president's health.

5:13pm

Sat March 24, 2012
Presidential Race

The GOP Contest: Louisiana And Beyond

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan, in for Guy Raz.

The Republican nominating contest is back in the South today as primary voters cast their ballots in Louisiana. A little earlier, we caught up with NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea who's on the road in Louisiana. Don, where are you now?

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5:08pm

Sat March 24, 2012
Books

Three-Minute Fiction: The Deadline Approaches

In Round 8 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest, listeners were given this challenge: Begin a story with this sentence: "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally decided to walk through the door." And, as always, the story must be 600 words or less. The deadline is 11:59 p.m. ET Sunday.

4:57pm

Sat March 24, 2012
Presidential Race

Dissecting Santorum's Ominous 'Obamaville' Ad

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 11:32 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

A new online ad from Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum sketches out a dire threat.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Imagine a small American town two years from now if Obama is re-elected. The wait to see a doctor is ever increasing. Gas prices through the roof, and the freedom of religion under attack.

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4:41pm

Sat March 24, 2012
U.S.

'Living, Breathing Archeology' In The Arizona Desert

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 8:42 am

Thousands of people try to cross the desert from Mexico into the United States every year.
Michael Wells

If you walk through the desert in southern Arizona you can find evidence of a major migration. Water bottles, shoes, food wrappers — these are some of the things left behind by the thousands of people who try to cross the border between Mexico and the United States every year.

For some people, the items are trash to be cleaned up; for others, they offer a window into a perilous voyage.

Combing The Desert

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4:11pm

Sat March 24, 2012
Law

Unlikely Advocates For Teen Killers: Victims' Families

Originally published on Sat March 24, 2012 11:32 pm

Mary Johnson and Oshea Israel wait outside the Supreme Court for Tuesday's hearing on whether it is unconstitutional to sentence teenagers to life in prison without the possibility of parole. When he was 16, Israel shot and killed Johnson's son.
Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week about the fate of 2,500 offenders who were sentenced as teenagers to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Seventy-nine of them were 13 or 14 when they committed their crimes.

Many prosecutors and family members of victims spoke out about the need to keep the sentences in place.

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