12:01am

Thu January 19, 2012
Opinion

Love On Hold: For Army Wife, Missed Connections

Siobhan Fallon welcomes home her husband from deployment with her daughter, Maeve, in 2009.
Courtesy of Siobhan Fallon

Siobhan Fallon is the author of the short-story collection You Know When the Men Are Gone.

The spouses of deployed soldiers have a desperate relationship with the phone.

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12:01am

Thu January 19, 2012
Europe

A Look Back At Bosnia, Through Angelina Jolie's Eyes

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 10:36 am

NPR's Tom Gjelten joined Angelina Jolie (right) on a panel about the film In the Land of Blood and Money. Also seen are Vanesa Glodjo (left) and Goran Kostic, who act in the film.
Courtesy of FilmDistrict

Angelina Jolie was just 16 when the war in Bosnia began, and she acknowledges now that she paid little heed to it at the time. But as her awareness of international issues later took shape, her attention was drawn back to that Balkan conflict.

"I wanted to understand," she says. "I was so young, and I felt that this was my generation; how do I not know more?" Now, that war is the subject of In the Land of Blood and Honey, her debut film as a writer and director.

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12:01am

Thu January 19, 2012
Crisis In The Housing Market

Silicon Valley Homebuilder Finds A Profitable Niche

James Witt stands next to the foundation of a house he is building in Palo Alto. Witt has built a successful business by tearing down and rebuilding houses in Silicon Valley. His business has survived four recessions, including the most recent one.
Cindy Carpien NPR

The U.S. housing market may be singing the blues, but there are pockets where home sales are rising. James Witt, a homebuilder in California's Silicon Valley is surviving and thriving thanks to his luck, location, and knowledge of the local market.

Witt is a tall lanky man whose graying long hair suggests an actor in a Western movie. He's standing on his 3-acre property in Palo Alto, which includes an updated old farmhouse and a yard with a pair of donkeys. One, named Perry, has an interesting pedigree.

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12:01am

Thu January 19, 2012
Energy

Cheap Chinese Panels Spark Solar Power Trade War

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 10:36 am

Contractors with SunEdison install more than 1,000 Chinese-made solar panels on top of a Kohl's Department Store in Hamilton Township, N.J., in 2010. Energy generated by the solar system will cut the store's usage, on average, by 25 to 30 percent.
Robert Nickelsberg Getty Images

There's a solar trade war going on inside the U.S., sparked by an invasion of inexpensive imports from China.

The U.S. solar industry is divided over these imports: Panel-makers say their business is suffering and want a tariff slapped on the imports. But other parts of the industry say these cheap panels are driving a solar boom in the U.S.

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12:01am

Thu January 19, 2012
Iraq

After 20 Years, An Iraqi Returns To A Changed Land

After a 20-year absence, Aseel Albanna returned to her native Iraq and found a very different country. Here, she poses with the statue of King Shahryar, a character in The Thousand and One Nights, near the Tigris River in Baghdad. The area used to be extremely popular, but many of the fish restaurants that once lined the streets have been torn down.
Sean Carberry NPR

In September 1991, Aseel Albanna was about to finish her last year of architecture school in Baghdad. Wanting a break from the years of war and hardship, she took a trip to the U.S. But a planned four-week visit turned into a 20-year stay.

Family members in Kentucky arranged for her to complete her architecture degree at the University of Kentucky. She then lived and worked in Louisville until she moved to Washington, D.C., in 2005.

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6:30pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Many Older Women May Not Need Frequent Bone Scans

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NPR journalist Gisele Grayson got her hip bone scanned a couple of years ago and discovered she has osteopenia.
NPR

The bone-thinning disease called osteoporosis is a big problem for women past menopause. It causes painful spine fractures and broken hips that plunge many women into a final downward spiral.

So it seemed to make sense to monitor older women's bones on a regular basis to see when they need to start taking drugs that prevent bone loss and fractures. Since Medicare will pay for a bone-density scan every two years, that's what many women have been getting.

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6:13pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Tarahumaras, Known For Running Great Distances, Are Facing A Food Crisis

This week, reports have started to filter out of the remote northern mountains of Mexico that the Tarahumara indians are facing hunger. The indians were immortalized by the book Born To Run, in which writer Christopher McDougall paints a portrait of a proud tribe that thrives on long distance running — a tribe that with little in their stomachs and even less on their feet, puts to shame even the best American ultra-marathoners.

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5:53pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Health and Welfare

Safety Award at the Chemical Agent Destruction Site

A national safety award has gone to more than 300 workers who are constructing the chemical–agent disposal facility at the Bluegrass Army Depot.  Work on the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant is expected to reach the halfway point later this year.  Disposal of nerve and mustard agents is scheduled to begin in 2017 and take two to three years to complete.  Michelle Sotak with the U.S Occupational Safety and Health Administration or OSHA presented officials and workers at the plant the Voluntary Protection Program Star Status plaque.  “They have a good program in place..the employees feel comfortable reporting injuries…they also feel comfortable in doing it the right way..not taking the short cut and that plays a big part in the injury rate,” said Sotak.

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5:47pm

Wed January 18, 2012
State Capitol

G-O-P Reaction to Governor's Budget

Kentucky lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle admit crafting a state budget this session will certainly include spending cuts.  Governor Beshear is suggesting an eight point four percent cut for most departments.  House Speaker Greg Stumbo doesn’t anticipate a great deal of change when the document emerges from the legislature. Madison County G-O-P Senator Jared Carpenter agrees in an equal cut philosopy. “There’s gonna be some sacrifices that everybody is gonna have to make..and I glad to see the governor is basically making those cuts across the board..I think everybody is gonna have to share in that sacrifice,” said Carpenter.

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5:30pm

Wed January 18, 2012
NPR Story

Two Democratic Allies Battle For One House Seat

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 6:15 pm

Reps. Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur on Sept 20, 2011, in Solon, Ohio. The state's new congressional district map has the two veteran Democrats now competing for the same congressional seat.
Amy Sancetta AP

Rep. Dennis Kucinich is most in his element when he's fighting against social injustice.

Wherever he sees an outrage against the little guy, you'll find the Ohio Democrat railing against it — like at a recent public meeting about a new trash-to-energy facility Cleveland wants to install in a west side neighborhood.

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