5:30pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Books

Three-Minute Fiction

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. That's the starting sentence for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction. That's our contest where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes. Our readers from across the country are combing through all of our 6,000 submissions this round. Let's hear a sample of their favorites so far.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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5:30pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Around the Nation

Women Take Over The Farm

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Staying in the middle of the country, you might have heard that America's farmers are getting older. Something else you probably know: women tend to outlive men. So do the math and what do you get? More women in charge of land and some who aren't really sure how to take care of it. So as Iowa Public Radio's Sarah McCammon reports, female conservationists are reaching out to this growing group.

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5:30pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Economy

Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 10:50 am

President Clinton prepares to sign legislation overhauling America's welfare system at the White House Rose Garden on Aug. 22, 1996. Today, the ranks of the nation's poor have swelled to a record 46.2 million — nearly 1 in 6 Americans — as the prolonged pain of the recession leaves millions still struggling and out of work.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Welfare changes in the 1990s helped slash cash benefit rolls, yet the use of food stamps is soaring today. About 15 percent of Americans use food stamps. The program has become what some call the new welfare.

A big reason why is a deal struck between President Clinton and the Republican-controlled Congress in 1996. At that time, the number of Americans who received cash payments — what's often thought of as welfare — was at an all-time high.

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5:02pm

Sun April 22, 2012
NPR Story

Comparing Trayvon Martin, O.J. Simpson Cases

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

On Friday, TV audiences got their first taste of the media frenzy that could come with a televised Trayvon Martin trial when a Florida judge granted bail to George Zimmerman. That decision, whether to televise or not, has yet to be made.

Writer John McWhorter thinks it would be a very good thing. And in the latest issue of The New Republic, he argues that it could become a bookend to another famous and racially charged trial: the O.J. Simpson case.

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5:02pm

Sun April 22, 2012
NPR Story

France's Sarkozy Faces Election Runoff

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

President Nicolas Sarkozy and socialist rival Francois Hollande were the top vote-getters in the first round of the French presidential election today. They'll head to a runoff on May 6. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris sent us this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS)

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3:50pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Around the Nation

A Return To 'Safety First' For Michigan Nuclear Plant

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

It's been quiet at the Palisades nuclear power plant after five unexpected shutdowns in 2011.
Mark Savage Entergy

The Palisades nuclear power plant in Michigan had five unplanned shutdowns last year. It's one of the area's biggest employers, and its safety record is one of the worst in the country. Now it's trying to prove to federal regulators that it can meet their standards.

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the Palisades Power Plant is tucked in between tall sand dunes in Covert Township, Mich., at the southern edge of Van Buren State Park.

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2:21pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Author Interviews

India: A Country In The Midst Of Change

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

Riverhead Books

Akash Kapur is the son of an Indian father and an American mother. In 2003, after working professionally in New York City for more than a decade, he decided to return to India. As he writes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India, he arrived in a place he hardly recognized.

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2:11pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Food

Fake Food: That's Not Kobe Beef You're Eating

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:45 am

Is that real Kobe beef? If you're eating it in the United States, then it's not.
Kelly Cline iStockphoto.com

An increasing number of restaurants in the U.S. display signature dishes made with Kobe beef. From Kobe steak raviolis to Kobe beef burgers, you name it, Kobe beef seems to be popping up everywhere — except it's not Kobe beef.

Food writer Larry Olmsted of Forbes.com couldn't help but notice the trend and decided to bust everyone's bubble in a three-part expose of the so-called domestic Kobe beef industry.

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11:57am

Sun April 22, 2012
Education

UK Officials Plan to Raise Tuition

University of Kentucky officials want to raise tuition by 6 percent for students and rule out raises for faculty and staff next year as they deal with a $43 million hole in the school's budget. For in-state freshmen and sophomores, that means tuition would jump from $9,128 this year to $9,676 in the 2012-13 academic year. For out-of-state students, tuition would increase from $18,740 a year to $19,864. UK's tuition will have grown 147 percent since 2002 if the UK Board of Trustees approves the tuition increase, as expected.

11:51am

Sun April 22, 2012
All Politics are Local

Centre College Prepares for Presidential Debate

Centre's Sutcliffe Center is well-suited to serve as the media hub for the vice presidential debate after a major renovation in 2005.
Clay Jackson/The Advocate-Messenger

Centre College will reprise its role as the smallest school to host a vice presidential debate in October, but additions to the campus over the last 12 years will be vital to both staging the event and accommodating an increasing enrollment. Preparations for the debate are in full swing at the school that likes to tout its reputation for punching above its weight, but some of the work that helped secure the event for the second time includes permanent additions to the campus.

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