3:36am

Tue April 24, 2012
National Security

U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

The Marines' most senior officers β€” including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) β€” are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan.
Bay Ismoyo AFP/Getty Images

There's some soul-searching going on in the military these days.

The latest scandal to hit U.S. troops fighting in Afghanistan surfaced last week when The Los Angeles Times published photographs showing smiling American soldiers holding up body parts of a Taliban suicide bomber.

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the latest incident during a trip to Brussels.

"That behavior that was depicted in those photos absolutely violates both our regulations and, more importantly, our core values," he said last week after a NATO meeting.

Read more

3:34am

Tue April 24, 2012
National Security

'Convention' Of Convicted Terrorists At N.Y. Trial

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:27 am

Bosnian-born Adis Medunjanin is accused of playing a role in the 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways. This photo of Medunjanin was provided by the U.S. attorney's office in Brooklyn, N.Y.
AP

There have been hundreds of terrorism trials in the U.S. since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but the case unfolding in Brooklyn, N.Y., is different. While its focus is on defendant Adis Medunjanin and the role he allegedly played in a 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways, the trial itself breaks new ground. It marks the first time the public is hearing in open court about real al-Qaida plots from the people the terrorist group actually dispatched to carry them out.

Read more

3:33am

Tue April 24, 2012
Around the Nation

New Rule Cracks Down On Bear Poaching In New York

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

The body parts of black bears are harvested all around the world, for use in Asian cooking and medicine. A new rule in New York aims to more closely monitor hunters who trade in body parts.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

A new rule that took effect this year in New York state is designed to stop the illegal sale of black bear parts for use in Asian medicine and cooking. While the sale of parts is still allowed, hunters will now have to document that they were taken legally.

The tiny village of Keene, N.Y., in the Adirondack Mountains is part of a trade network that supplies Asian apothecaries and restaurants from New York City to Seoul, South Korea.

Read more

3:32am

Tue April 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

If The Health Care Overhaul Goes Down, Could Medicare Follow?

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 5:18 am

A growing number of health experts are warning of potential collateral damage if the Supreme Court strikes down the entire 2010 Affordable Care Act: potential chaos in the Medicare program.

Read more

3:31am

Tue April 24, 2012
Environment

Melt Or Grow? Fate Of Himalayan Glaciers Unknown

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:14 am

In this undated picture, Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,029 feet, stands behind the Khumbu Glacier, one of the longest glaciers in the world. Nepal has more than 2,300 glacial lakes, and experts say at least 20 are in danger of bursting.
Subel Bhandari AFP/Getty Images

The Himalayas are sometimes called the world's "third pole" because they are covered with thousands of glaciers. Water from those glaciers helps feed some of the world's most important rivers, including the Ganges and the Indus. And as those glaciers melt, they will contribute to rising sea levels.

So a lot is at stake in understanding these glaciers and how they will respond in a warming world. Researchers writing in the latest issue of Science magazine make it clear they are still struggling at that task.

Read more

3:30am

Tue April 24, 2012
Election 2012

Romney Keeps Hand Hidden On Running Mate Pick

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:19 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, joined by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks to reporters during a news conference in Aston, Pa., on Monday. Rubio is frequently mentioned as a potential running mate for Romney.
Jae C. Hong AP

Ahead of Pennsylvania's primary Tuesday, the likely Republican presidential nominee has been campaigning in the state with a man at the center of running-mate speculation β€” Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. But Mitt Romney hasn't said much about whom he might name as his vice presidential choice.

Romney has said he appointed a longtime aide to handle the process and that he hasn't yet discussed making a list of potential candidates. But just about everyone else in politics is discussing it. And the men at the top of that list are asked about it a lot.

Read more

3:29am

Tue April 24, 2012
Family Matters: The Money Squeeze

Preparing For A Future That Includes Aging Parents

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:52 am

Natasha Shamone-Gilmore (right) attends church with her husband, Curtis Gilmore (center), and her father, Franklin Brunson, 81. Shamone-Gilmore moved Brunson into her Capitol Heights, Md., home after he developed dementia.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Planning a wedding is exciting.

Mapping out a vacation is fun.

Figuring how to afford care for your confused, elderly father? That one may never cross your mind β€” at least, not until you need more money to care for him.

"Never thought about it," Natasha Shamone-Gilmore, 58, says about her younger self. "Never ever."

She thinks about it a lot these days. Shamone-Gilmore, a computer trainer in Maryland, now shares a modest home with her husband, 24-year-old son and 81-year-old father.

Read more

8:56pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Mona Eltahawy Explains Why Women Are Hated In The Middle East

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 10:58 am

Mona Eltahawy (center), a prominent Egyptian-born, U.S.-based columnist, and Egyptian activist Samira Ibrahim (left) march in downtown Cairo to mark International Women's Day in March.
Maya Alleruzzo AP

We don't usually point out opinion pieces on this blog. But Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-born and U.S.-based journalist, is making a statement worth noting. She wrote a cover essay titled "Why Do They Hate Us?" for this month's Foreign Policy.

Read more

7:09pm

Mon April 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Prosecutor Accuses Clemens Of 'Deceit,' 'Dishonesty'

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:49 am

Former all-star baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves the U.S. District Court on Monday after the first day of his perjury and obstruction trial in Washington, D.C.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The retrial of baseball great Roger Clemens began in earnest Monday after a week of jury selection. Clemens is charged with lying in 2008 to a congressional committee when he denied ever using steroids or human growth hormone.

He will be judged by a jury of 10 women and 6 men β€” 12 jurors and 4 alternates β€” who will decide whether Clemens lied under oath about using the drugs when he testified before a congressional committee investigating the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball.

Read more

7:05pm

Mon April 23, 2012
Education

Council Approves Tuition Increase

The Council on Postsecondary Education has approved a six percent tuition increase for the universities of Louisville and Kentucky. The council also capped tuition at four percent for community colleges system and five percent for the state’s comprehensive universities. It’s expected these rate increases will result in over $40 million for the institutions but schools are still expected to accrue deficits due to cuts to the state budget and rising maintenance costs.

Read more

Pages