12:29pm

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Syria: Another Protest, Another Crackdown In Aleppo

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 12:35 pm

Free Syrian Army members from the al-Faruq Brigade arrive to attend the funeral of one of their comrades at the Khaled Ibn al-Walid mosque in the al-Khalidiyah neighbourhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on Thursday.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

A day after the security forces of President Bashar Assad raided the campus of Aleppo University, thousands of protesters took to the streets of Syria's second city and its economic powerhouse.

The AP talked to Mohammed Saeed, an activist, who said protesters were "incensed" by the raid at the university, which killed four.

"Everyone wants to express solidarity with those students," the activist told the AP, adding that the forces fired live ammunition into the crowd.

The AP adds:

Read more

12:21pm

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

'Falling Bear,' We Hardly Knew You; Famous Bruin Killed On Highway

The "falling bear" photo that brought him fame.
Andy Duann CU Independent

It was just a week ago that he dropped into our lives.

Now, we're sorry to report that "falling bear" is dead.

In case you're not familiar with the story, it was April 26 when University of Colorado Boulder student Andy Duann snapped a shot of a tranquilized bear as it was falling from a tree on campus.

The bear survived and was released back into the wild about 50 miles from Boulder.

Read more

11:32am

Fri May 4, 2012
The Salt

The 'Smart Fridge' Finds The Lost Lettuce, For A Price

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:24 am

Samsung's fridge with an LCD screen has 28 cubic feet of space inside.
Courtesy of Samsung

Here at The Salt, we've taken note of the all-too-common habit of letting food rot in the fridge. Food waste can cost hundreds of dollars a year, and once it arrives at a landfill to decompose, it turns into a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. And that makes us feel guilty.

Now some home appliance companies are banking on the hope that some consumers will turn over their food waste worries to a computer inside their fridge.

Read more

11:23am

Fri May 4, 2012
Movie Reviews

A Gershwin Biopic That Ain't Necessarily So True

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 3:58 pm

George Gershwin's most famous works include Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris and the opera Porgy and Bess.
Warner Archives

The movie Rhapsody in Blue, a biography of George Gershwin, was released only eight years after his death from a brain tumor at the age of 38. It's a good subject: Gershwin wrote some of the best popular songs ever produced in this country, but he also had ambitions to be a serious classical composer and wrote symphonic music, concertos and an opera — all of which are still performed.

Read more

11:10am

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Fracking: New Rules Aim To Bring 'Best Practices' To Public Lands

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 12:45 pm

Saying that the rules would "make sure that fracturing operations conducted on public and Indian lands follow common-sense industry best practices," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar this morning issued proposed regulations that would:

-- Require "public disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations on federal lands."

-- Ensure that "wells used in fracturing operations [on public lands] meet appropriate construction standards."

-- Require operators to "put in place appropriate plans for managing flowback waters from fracturing operations."

Read more

10:58am

Fri May 4, 2012
Author Interviews

The U.S. Ambassador Inside Hitler's Berlin

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 11:23 am

Adolf Hitler (right) with his foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop in 1941.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on May 9, 2011. In The Garden Of Beasts is now available in paperback.

Read more

10:36am

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Junior Seau's Family OKs Having His Brain Studied, 'L.A. Times' Reports

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 4:49 pm

Junior Seau in 2008, when he played for the New England Patriots.
Otto Greule Jr Getty Images

As soon as it was learned on Wednesday that former NFL star Junior Seau had killed himself, there was speculation about whether he may have suffered brain injuries during his career that in turn led to depression or dementia.

Read more

10:01am

Fri May 4, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

School Bake Sales Draw Fire In Obesity Battle

Moms and their kids protest a proposed ban on homemade food at bake sales in New York City schools at a rally near City Hall in 2010. One sign read, "I wanna get obese on my terms. No junk food."
edenpictures Flickr

An American tradition is in jeopardy.

The bake sale, a staple of school fundraising for generations, is getting squeezed. The epidemic of childhood obesity is leading some districts to restrict the kinds of foods sold or to ban the sales altogether, Bloomberg Businessweek's Stephanie Armour explained on Friday's Morning Edition.

Read more

9:57am

Fri May 4, 2012

9:48am

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

AP Apologizes For WWII-Era Firing Of Reporter

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:55 am

May 7, 1945: In Frankfurt, Germany, Allied commanders including British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Soviet Marshal Gregori Zhukov and others celebrate the German surrender.
AFP/Getty Images

Sixty seven years later, The Associated Press is apologizing for the way it condemned and then fired one of its correspondents for reporting "perhaps the biggest scoop in its history."

Edward Kennedy was among a small group of reporters taken by Allied military officials to witness the May 7, 1945, surrender by German forces at a schoolhouse in Reims, France.

Read more

Pages