2:49am

Mon May 7, 2012
Fine Art

The Serious Comic Art Of Daniel Clowes

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 11:09 am

Artist Daniel Clowes says Enid, the cantankerous heroine of Ghost World, would probably hate the book she stars in.
Daniel Clowes Oakland Museum of California

Comics used to be seen as cheap throwaway entertainment for children and teenagers. But over the last few decades, comics have grown up; they're even released in longer formats, on nice paper with hard covers, as graphic novels.

Daniel Clowes is one of the artists cited for turning the form into serious art — in fact, the art has gotten so serious that his work is now in a museum. Clowes is one of the best-known comic artists working today, with two of his books made into Hollywood films: the Academy Award-nominated Ghost World and Art School Confidential.

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2:48am

Mon May 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Tornado Recovery Offers Joplin Students New Lessons

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 6:34 am

In this photo taken June 14, 2011, a damaged sign for Joplin High School (transformed into "hope" with tape) is seen in front of the school. The school was one of three in the city destroyed by an EF-5 tornado that wiped out much of the community.
Charlie Riedel AP

Graduation is supposed to in part be about celebrating the future, but last year in Joplin, Mo., shortly after the high school graduation ceremony, an EF-5 tornado — the highest-strength rating — destroyed one-third of the city and killed 161 people, including one teen who had received his diploma that day.

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2:47am

Mon May 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Never-Married Parents Get Help From Special Court

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 8:50 am

Joseph Arradondo assists his son Nasir, 2, on the sidelines of his daughter's soccer game in Brooklyn Park, Minn. Arradondo attended Co-Parent Court about a year ago and says the court helped with communication between him and Nasir's mother.
Jeffrey Thompson/MPR News

Across the U.S., 40 percent of children are now born to unmarried parents. This demographic shift, primarily among younger, low-income parents, can pose a challenge to a child support system designed chiefly to extract money from paychecks.

A court in Minneapolis is now trying a new approach, one that's about more than just the money as it attempts to keep both parents involved in the lives of their kids.

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2:46am

Mon May 7, 2012
Your Money

Before The IPO: A Private Market For Tech Shares

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 6:34 am

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg speaks in a video that is part of the company's prospectus for investors. By remaining a privately held company, Facebook has helped boost the popularity of secondary stock markets.
NPR

Very soon, Facebook will go public. That means anyone will be able to buy shares of the social networking giant on the Nasdaq exchange. But sophisticated investors have already been buying pieces of Facebook and many other hot tech stocks, on private exchanges.

And now it seems that trading in private company shares is poised to grow, thanks to recent changes in the law.

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2:38am

Mon May 7, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

'Wired To Run': Runner's High May Have Been Evolutionary Advantage

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:45 am

Researchers say our brains are probably wired from an evolutionary sense to encourage running and high aerobic activities. Above, a man runs past the Sydney Harbour Bridge on April 22.
Ryan Pierse Getty Images

Endurance athletes sometimes say they're "addicted" to exercise. In fact, scientists have shown that rhythmic, continuous exercise — aerobic exercise — can in fact produce narcoticlike chemicals in the body.

Now researchers suggest that those chemicals may have helped turn humans, as well as other animals, into long-distance runners.

The man behind the research is University of Arizona anthropologist David Raichlen, a runner himself. He does about 25 miles a week.

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2:37am

Mon May 7, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Is It Possible To Walk And Work At The Same Time?

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:01 am

Studies say just 30 minutes of walking a day can reduce several lifestyle diseases many Americans are living with.
iStockphoto.com

When it comes to walking, the easy part is understanding the benefits: Regular, brisk walks can strengthen our bones, help control blood sugar, help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and the list goes on. The hard part is finding the time to fit it in.

Engineering physical activity back into Americans' daily lives is the goal of an educational campaign launched by Kaiser Permanente,an Oakland, Calif.-based health plan.

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12:00am

Mon May 7, 2012
Health and Welfare

Poll Shows Majority Favors Statewide Smoking Ban

A new poll by a nonpartisan health organization suggests a majority of Kentuckians would support a statewide smoking ban. The Kentucky Health Issues Poll is conducted by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. And its 2011 poll, taken last fall and released this week, shows that 54 percent of Kentuckians would approve an indoor statewide smoking ban. Kentucky’s General Assembly has flirted with a law that would create a statewide smoking ban, but it has yet to fully make it through both chambers.

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12:00am

Mon May 7, 2012
All Politics are Local

Moore Endorsed by Two Pro-Life Groups

Republican congressional candidate Gary Moore now has endorsements from two major pro-life groups. Moore received the endorsement of Kentucky Right to Life today. Moore is also the Boone County Judge-Executive, and he previously received the Northern Kentucky Right to Life endorsement. “Now having sole endorsements from Kentucky Right to Life, along with the sole endorsement from Northern Kentucky Right to Life, Gary Moore has the exacta on pro-life issues and is the only proven social conservative in this race," says Moore's campaign manager Jonathan Duke.

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6:02pm

Sun May 6, 2012
Author Interviews

'Teachers Make' A Difference, What About You?

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 10:45 am

iStockPhoto.com

Teaching, once a revered profession, has of late been much maligned. Teachers are accused of laziness and greed. They're blamed for low test scores, and a general decline in the nation's educational standing. Most people believe their work day is short and their vacations are long. But teachers also have their defenders — perhaps none so passionate as Taylor Mali.

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6:02pm

Sun May 6, 2012
Politics

Libertarians Find Their Audience In 2012 Race

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 10:45 am

Former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson was nominated as the Libertarian party's candidate for president at their national convention in Las Vegas over the weekend.
Joe Burbank AP

Somewhere on the path to the White House this year, a powerful set of ideas began to creep into the mainstream debate over which direction the country will take.

These are ideas that not too long ago were written off as marginal, or even worse, a little kooky. They come from Libertarians: free and open markets and extremely limited government. Those ideals are now becoming more mainstream and are influencing the Republican Party.

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