1:17pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Sports

As Ivies Boost Financial Aid, Teams Up Their Game

Harvard University forward Kyle Casey in an NCAA game against Princeton on Saturday. Casey says financial aid from Harvard makes the school more attractive to student athletes.
Mel Evans Getty Images

New York Knicks guard and Harvard University alumnus Jeremy Lin may be a sudden NBA sensation, but the men's basketball team at his alma mater is making its own mark on the national scene.

Harvard is currently on top of the Ivy League basketball standings. And with a 21-3 overall record and some impressive nonconference wins, the Crimson spent part of the season in the Top 25 in national polls for Division I.

There's a palpable buzz about the team, as well — even a late January road game against the struggling squad from Brown University was a sellout.

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1:09pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Business and the Economy

Funding Deficit Closes Center

Faye Lewis hugs Jonathan Philpot, 4, at the PUSH Early Childhood Development Center Thursday.
Hannah Reel/The State Journal

After serving Franklin County’s special needs children for more than 30 years, PUSH Early Childhood Development Center announced Thursday it will be closing its doors next week. The Board of Directors passed a motion in its meeting Wednesday night to suspend the center’s operations starting Feb. 24, citing deficits and a decline in funding. Founded in 1979 by parents of children with special needs, PUSH is a learning center that specializes in working with economically, physically and socially disadvantaged children. There are currently 41 kids, ranging from infants to 5-year-olds, enrolled.

1:06pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Education

UK President Looks Abroad for Funding

Dr. Eli Capilouto speaks to the Rotary Club of Frankfort Thursday night at the 15th Annual International Dinner at Capital Plaza Hotel.
Tricia Spaulding/The State-Journal

As University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto watches state and federal dollars dip, a new source of funding has emerged: research grants from abroad. “We live in a new normal,” he told members of the Frankfort Rotary Club Thursday. “The expectation of the traditional sources of funding – state and federal support – are going to be flat, and we’re realizing in Kentucky this year, they may even decline for the next several years.” But by expanding research partnerships abroad and looking for opportunities to collaborate with foreign countries, Capilouto said UK can weather the economic storm.

12:53pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Lexington/Richmond

Doctor Suspended After Raid

During Wednesday's raid at Lexington Algiatry, a pain clinic on Alexandria Drive, authorities collected boxes of evidence.
Lexington Herald-Leader

The doctor at a Lexington pain clinic that was raided by the Drug Enforcement Administration had little formal training in pain management or primary care, yet he was paid $7,500 a week to write prescriptions for powerful narcotic painkillers, according to the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure. Documents detailing the medical board's allegations were provided to the Herald-Leader on Thursday, after the medical board voted in Louisville to suspend the license of Dr. Najam Azmat, who was prescribing drugs at Lexington Algiatry, a pain clinic on Alexandria Drive. The DEA raided the clinic Wednesday.

12:49pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Health and Welfare

Schools Receive Money to Promote Health

The Kentucky Department for Public Health and its partners have selected 41 high schools to receive grants to develop or improve the nutritional, physical activity or tobacco prevention policies at their schools. The $500 grants are part of the Students Taking Charge program offered by Kentucky Action for Healthy Kids. Students Taking Charge provides students with the tools necessary to develop healthy policies and environments within their schools, according to a state press release.

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12:47pm

Fri February 17, 2012
The Salt

Is That A Plastic Baby Jesus In My Cake?

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 5:04 pm

Sucre in New Orleans is one of many bakeries that leaves the plastic baby out of the king cake.
John Rose/NPR

If you've been in New Orleans for carnival season, or if you're lucky enough to taste a cake from there that has arrived in the mail, there's a pretty good chance that yes, there is a plastic baby that comes with your cake.

The baby, meant to represent Jesus, has become a fixture of the king cake (galette des rois in France or rosca de reyes as it's called in Mexico). It's a frosted yeast dough cake that New Orleans bakeries churn out between King's Day, January 6th, and Fat Tuesday, the last day of indulgence before Lent.

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12:43pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Education

Resources for Adults Returning to College

Kentucky adults considering returning to college have a free resource to help them make decisions about higher education. Adults Returning to School is published by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA), the state agency that administers Kentucky student financial aid programs and provides college planning materials.

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12:40pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Business and the Economy

Funding Changes Ark Park Plans

Artist rendering of proposed Ark Encounter theme park. / Provided

The Ark Encounter themed attraction planned for Grant County will be built in phases over several years rather than as a single project. Mark Looy, co-founder of Answers in Genesis, the biblical apologetics ministry that built the Creation Museum in Hebron, said the decision will reduce the initial construction period and funding requirements for the Noah’s Ark-themed park that was initially scheduled for completion in 2014. On Wednesday, the Ark Encounter group also announced the purchase of the final piece of land needed to develop the park.

12:35pm

Fri February 17, 2012
All Politics are Local

Brent Spence Toll Discussed

David Williams, president of the state Senate, addresses members of a group from the Northern Kentucky in a meeting room at the Capitol Building in Frankfort.
The Kentucky Enquirer

The likelihood of tolls on the Brent Spence Bridge joined several other issues business leaders from Northern Kentucky discussed with the Kentucky General Assembly on Thursday. More than 50 people traveled to Frankfort with the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce for the “Northern Kentucky Day in Frankfort.” Senate President David Williams, R-Burkesville, told the group the $2 billion Brent Spence Bridge replacement likely won’t get built without tolls.

12:30pm

Fri February 17, 2012
All Politics are Local

Senate Panel Approves PSE Bill

After hearing emotional testimony from a former methamphetamine user, the Senate Judiciary Committee narrowly approved a bill Thursday that would require a prescription for most cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine. Kentuckians still could purchase gel caps that contain pseudoephedrine — a key ingredient needed to make meth — without a prescription. It is more difficult to make meth with pseudoephedrine from a gel cap. The sponsor of Senate Bill 50, Majority Leader Robert Stivers, R-Manchester, said he didn't know the bill's chances in the full Senate. The legislation died in the Senate last year.

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