2:37pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Afghanistan

U.S., Afghan Forces Try To Rebuild Trust

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:00 pm

A U.S. soldier instructs Afghan soldiers in the western city of Herat last July. Afghans in security force uniforms have killed a number of U.S. and NATO troops recently. The shootings come as NATO works to prepare the Afghan forces to take control of security.
Jalil Rezayee EPA /Landov

In Afghanistan, the killings are called "green on blue" — that's when an Afghan soldier or police officer turns his gun on a NATO ally.

There was a wave of such violence just last month after U.S. soldiers accidentally burned Korans. Over the next week, six Americans were killed, apparently at the hands of Afghans working with the U.S.

The top U.S. and NATO commanders in Afghanistan think they have some answers to this recurring problem, and it's up to U.S. soldiers like Capt. Joe Fritze to see if they work.

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2:25pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

With 'Mouth To Snout' CPR, 'Mushing Mortician' Saves Iditarod Dog

Marshall, after his brush with death.
SB Nation

This story broke Wednesday in the Anchorage Daily News, but it has too much going for it not to pass along.

Monday night while competing in Alaska's Iditarod dog sled race, Scott Janssen's 9-year-old husky Marshall collapsed.

"Janssen raced to the dog," the newspaper writes. "Marshall did not appear to be breathing."

"I know what death looks like, and he was gone. Nobody home," Janssen told the Daily News.

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2:22pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

How Divided Is Congress? Two Charts Explain It

A chart from the National Journal.
National Journal

This is from a few days ago, but we missed it until The Atlantic pointed it out today.

We know Congress is divided. But how much so?

Here's a graph The Atlantic dug up from data The National Journal has put together using data they've collected for about 30 years analyzing congressional votes:

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1:11pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Planet Money

This 14-Year-Old Girl Just Bought A House In Florida

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 10:46 am

Willow Tufano, landlord.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Meet Willow Tufano, age 14: Lady Gaga fan, animal lover, landlord.

In 2005, when Willow was 7, the housing market was booming. Home prices in some Florida neighborhoods nearly doubled from one month to the next. Her family moved into a big house; her mom became a real estate agent.

But as Willow moved from childhood to adolescence, the market turned, and the neighborhood emptied out. "Everyone is getting foreclosed on here," she says.

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12:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Photo: Northern Lights Over Iceland

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 1:28 pm

The Northern Lights in the sky Thursday above Faskusfjordur on the east coast of Iceland Thursday.
Jonina Oskardottir AP

The solar storm that swept over Earth Thursday didn't seem to cause any major problems, as some had feared.

But the prediction that it would create some beautiful Northern Lights has proved to be quite true. The Associated Press has moved a quite striking photo taken Thursday on the east coast of Iceland.

If you see others, and good videos as well, share any links in the comments thread.

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12:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
It's All Politics

The Fight Over Voter ID Laws Goes To The United Nations

NAACP president Ben Jealous hopes that international pressure might be another weapon against strict new voter ID laws. Here Jealous speaks on Jan. 16 at the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C. for Martin Luther King Day.
Rainier Ehrhardt Reuters /Landov

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People announced it will appear before the United Nations' Human Rights Council in Geneva next week to seek support for its fight against voter identification laws enacted in U.S. states.

The civil rights organization says the laws are among several measures adopted by some states that violate the human and civil rights of minority voters by suppressing their participation in elections.

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12:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Education

Questions Grow Over Race Discipline Report

The Department of Education's top civil rights official, Russlynn Ali, speaks with host Michel Martin about a new report. It finds students of color have less access to high-level classes, their teachers are often paid less than those of white students in same district, and suspension rates for black students are disproportionately high.

11:21am

Fri March 9, 2012
State Capitol

Ex-Cons Rally for their Voting Rights

Supporters of legislation to restore voting rights to felons say the offenders have paid their debt to society and should have full suffrage granted automatically. House Bill 70 is a constitutional amendment that would allow for that restoration, which is currently banned. The House has already advanced the measure, but like in years past, the bill seems dead on arrival in the state Senate.

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11:19am

Fri March 9, 2012
State Capitol

Legislators Ante Up for Tornado Survivors

Kentucky lawmakers and their staffs have raised more than twenty thousand dollars for disaster relief this week. Members of the Kentucky General Assembly had set a goal of ten thousand dollars to donate to the Red Cross in the wake of tornadoes that struck eastern and northern Kentucky last week.

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11:00am

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Check Out This 7-Year-Old's Monster Trap

Audri, up close.
YouTube.com

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