4:57pm

Sat July 21, 2012
Author Interviews

From Juvie To J.D.: The Story Of A 'Runaway Girl'

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 5:24 pm

When Carissa Phelps was 12, she dropped out of seventh grade in the small town of Coalinga, Calif. Her homelife was dysfunctional and soon, she ran away.

Her life on the streets took its toll, and before long the unthinkable happened: she was kidnapped by a pimp and forced into prostitution.

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4:32pm

Sat July 21, 2012
Health

Say 'Ahhh': A Simpler Way To Detect Parkinson's

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 8:45 pm

Mathematician Max Little has come up with an algorithm that can detect Parkinson's just using a person's voice.
Courtesy of Max Little

There's currently no cure for Parkinson's, a debilitating neurological disease. There's also no blood test that can detect it, meaning early intervention is almost impossible.

But soon there might be a shockingly easy way to screen for Parkinson's disease. It would be as simple as picking up the telephone and saying "ahhh."

"There's some evidence, admittedly weak, that voice disturbances may well be one of the first or early indicator of the disease," mathematician Max Little tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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4:24pm

Sat July 21, 2012
History

Immigration, The Gold Mountain And A Wedding Photo

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 7:50 pm

Wedding photograph of Wong Lan Fong and Yee Shew Ning, 1926.
U.S. National Archives and Records

Deep inside the National Archives in Washington, D.C., old case files tell the stories of hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants to the U.S. between 1880 and the end of World War II.

These stories are in the form of original documents and photographs that were often attached to immigrant case files. Many of them are part of a new exhibit at the Archives, called "Attachments."

For University of Minnesota history professor Erika Lee, one of these attachments turned out to be very special.

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3:02pm

Sat July 21, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

A Musician And The Audition Of His Life

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:18 pm

To audition for the BSO, percussionist Mike Tetreault was required to prepare musical excerpts from 50 pieces on nine different instruments, including timpani.
Sean Hagwell Mike Tetreault

Earlier this year, classical percussionist Mike Tetreault walked onstage at Symphony Hall in Boston for the audition of a lifetime: The Boston Symphony Orchestra was looking for not just one but two new percussionists.

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11:04am

Sat July 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Other Top Stories: Ferry Accident In Tanzania; More Fighting In Syria

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 12:22 pm

While the shooting rampage in Aurora, Colo., is dominating the news today, there are other headlines:

-- "146 Presumed Dead In Tanzania Ferry Accident." (The Associated Press)

-- "Syrian Forces Battle Rebels In Aleppo." (Reuters)

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9:23am

Sat July 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Aurora Rampage Joins Grim List Of Worst Mass Shootings

A memorial outside the movie theater in Aurora, Co., where 12 people died and about 58 were wounded by a gunman early Friday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

When tragedies happen, comparisons are always made to past events. It's become part of the news coverage of the Aurora, Colo., theater rampage to refer to it as "one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history," as The Associated Press says.

The wire service has a list — "Some of the world's worst mass shootings" — that includes many that happened in the U.S.:

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8:18am

Sat July 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Aurora Suspect: A 'Smart And Quiet Man' Who Allegedly Hid A 'Deadly Plan'

Originally published on Sat July 21, 2012 1:35 pm

A photo of James Holmes released by the University of Colorado Denver.
University of Colorado Denver

The Denver Post continues to dig into the life of James Eagan Holmes, the 24-year-old suspect in the shooting rampage Friday in Aurora, Colo., that left at least 12 people dead and about 58 wounded.

Friday, as Eyder wrote, an image emerged of Holmes as something of a recluse.

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7:35am

Sat July 21, 2012
Author Interviews

'Our Kind': Unpacking Misconceptions About AIDS

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A new book about global attitudes to the AIDS epidemic in Africa, lays some of the blame at the door of Joseph Conrad. Conrad's novel "Heart of Darkness," says the author - who's Uzodinma Iweala - connected inferiority and disease with Africa and Africans, in way which is still evident today. Uzodinma Iweala was himself was born in Washington D.C., the city with the worst incidence of AIDS in the United States. His first book, a novel called "Beasts of No Nation," told the harrowing story of child soldiers in Africa.

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7:35am

Sat July 21, 2012
Sports

What's Coming Over The Olympic Horizon

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And it's time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: OK, maybe that should be the (hums Olympic theme) because in just a few days, all the pomp and patriotism, the grit and athleticism, the sweat and pomposity of the 2010 Olympic Summer Games begins. Here with a preview NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Did I just hear doves released in the studio there, Scott?

(LAUGHTER)

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7:35am

Sat July 21, 2012
Around the Nation

Tragedy In Colo. Hits Movie Audiences Nationwide

The phrase "theater number 9" may soon be one of those added to our collective memory. That is where the shootings in Aurora, Colo., took place. It has some movie goers wondering about their safety in cities across the country.

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