Reuters

Throughout its 100-year history, US National Parks have served as a model for other countries trying to set up their own networks of protected spaces.

Now China is quietly planning its own national parks system.

And, like Costa Rica and India before them, the Chinese are looking toward America.

“They've visited several locations in the US, and they're basically trying to get ideas on how US parks are managed,” said Beijing-based science journalist Kathleen McLaughlin.

Charles Platiau/Reuters

Sonia Rykiel, the influential French designer who helped shape the contemporary woman's wardrobe, died Thursday at the age of 86 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease.

The pioneering Rykiel was a fixture in the industry for half a century, launching her own fashion house in 1968 buoyed by the Swinging Sixties craze in London and the emerging feminist movement across the globe.

Her sophisticated laid-back chic, iconic bright stripes, fluid fabrics and easy-to-wear yet feminine style came to typify a new generation of liberated women.

Steve Dolinsky/PRI

If you’re going to celebrate anything while in Bogota, I think the only place to do it right is a restaurant called Andres Carne de Res.

The legendary restaurant has been around since 1982, in an area called Chia, about 45 minutes outside of town. While on assignment at a gastronomy conference, I opted for its newer but quite substantial location in the Zona Rosa section of town.

Ky. Officials Respond to Spike in Heroin Overdoses

Aug 26, 2016
kentucky.com

    

Health and law enforcement officials in Kentucky are responding to a rash of heroin-related drug overdoses.   In the community of Mount Sterling alone, there were 12 overdoses this week including one death.  

The majority of overdoses in Montgomery County occurred within five hours Wednesday evening.

Did religion save this Guatemalan town?

Aug 26, 2016
Daniel LeClair/Reuters

In seeking the evangelical vote, Donald Trump has been shunned by many a pastor put off by his behavior and values.

He has gotten support, though, among some evangelical adherents of the Prosperity Gospel, who believe that faith can bring material reward.

It’s time for our weekly update of weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley of the Lexington Herald-Leader. Rich tells us he’s a “solo act” this week as Harriett Hendren takes some time off after putting together the 2016-2017 arts calendar for Sunday’s paper.   

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. 

You can also find listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

Ky.’s Presence Felt in Louisiana Cleanup

Aug 26, 2016

    People well outside the borders of Louisiana are responding to massive flood damage in the gulf coast state. That includes a contingent from Baptist churches in Kentucky.

Corbin resident Dave Hampton is leading a crew of 21 to cut out walls, move out appliances, take up floors, pressure wash, and sanitize houses.  He compares the damage to that seen after Hurricane Katrina.  Hampton says neighbors are helping neighbors.  “A lot of times we go out to the house and it’s already half done because the neighbors are helping each other.”

Lexington Council to Review Police, Fire Disciplinary Notices

Aug 26, 2016
kentucky.com

    

Lexington leaders are being asked to modify city council’s notification procedure for police and fire disciplinary reports.  The item will be considered in a special meeting.

Council acted Tuesday to include the matter on a special "committee of the whole" agenda.  Council member Susan Lamb wants to discuss including notification of routine disciplinary reports on council dockets. 

A new director has been named for the State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control’s Enforcement Division.  Paul Joseph Vido comes to the job after serving as Special Agent in Charge for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives out of Louisville. 

Vido administered all ATF investigations and regulatory operations in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Southern Indiana.  Prior to coming to Kentucky, he served in a similar role in California. 

Aaron P. Bernstein/Reuters

The evening of August 13 started out as a reporting assignment for Aaron Mak, a Yale student and intern at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. It turned into a lesson about policing, race and protest in today's America.

Milwaukee police had just shot and killed a black man named Sylville Smith, and when Mak arrived at the scene, hundreds of people had already gathered in protest.

BLM Politico piece

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