News

Study: Kentuckians’ Views On Climate Change Based On Politics

Jun 13, 2016
wkms.org

A survey has found some interesting takeaways about Kentuckians’ attitudes toward climate change, including that the biggest influence on beliefs may be political affiliation rather than scientific knowledge.

There have been numerous studies about attitudes toward climate change around the country, but very few have looked at Kentucky specifically. For her master’s thesis at Kentucky State University, Jennifer Hubbard-Sanchez surveyed 229 Kentuckians about their climate change beliefs and knowledge.

Listener David reacted to a comment we aired last week, critical of the show “Q” from the CBC which we air weekday afternoons at 2:00, “I just, a minute ago, heard a comment that you aired from a listener about the program “Q” which I find wonderful and lively and unpredictable.” 

David continues, “I think that we benefit from hearing programs that are not simply from the U.S. but in this case Canadian. I’m a real supporter of that program and astonished by his negative reaction to it.”

John Hingsbergen

Hundreds gathered in Lexington’s Triangle Park Sunday night for a vigil in memory of the victims of the nation’s worst mass shooting. 

Worship leader of Bluegrass United Church of Christ, Kenny Bishop offered this with his opening comments, inviting those in attendance to say with him,  “God is love.”

Bishop told those gathered scripture says, “Perfect love casts out fear.” 

Reflecting on the tragic loss of life inside a gay bar in Orlando, a range of emotions was running through the downtown crowd.  The gunman had claimed allegiance to the Islamic State. 

From a Facebook notice posted Sunday by Lexington Fairness:  

"This morning, America and the world woke up to the worst mass shooting in the history of The United States. This vigil is meant to bring our community together to show our community's support for the Orlando and entire Flordia community. Please make plans to join at Triangle Park starting at 8:00 pm. There will be a limited supply of candles, so if you have some please bring them."

    Today’s ribbon cutting to recognize the renovation and expansion of Madison County’s Emergency Operations Center attracted military, local government, business, and interested citizen representation.  The scheduled disposal of chemical weapons stored nearby played a key role in the development of the center.

RICHMOND, Ky. (AP) — An official says it is expected to cost about $20 million to make repairs at a central Kentucky chemical weapons destruction plant. 

Bechtel Parsons Blue Grass, the general contractor for the plant in Madison County, said it is seeking compensation from General Atomics of San Diego for the cost to replace piping with deficient welds since the welds were done by a subcontractor for that company.

courier-journal.com

An effort is underway in Kentucky to replace a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in the Capitol Rotunda with a tribute to boxing legend MuhammadAli. 

Lexington attorney and former State Treasurer Jonathan Miller has begun anonline petition seeking the change.  Miller says Ali’s recent death has more people talking about his place in history. 

New Drug Treatment Program Planned for Lexington Jail

Jun 9, 2016
riccigreene.com

A new long term substance abuse treatment program is being implemented at Lexington’s jail.  Members of a Lexington city council committee were briefed on the initiative this week.   Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention Program Director Amy Baker says the plan calls for a 20 bed six month treatment format for male inmates.  “To receive long term treatment in hopes that the issues that brought them there will be addressed in jail and when they get out of jail, the cycle will be broken.”

National Park Centennial Brings Music to Mammoth Cave

Jun 9, 2016
esm.rochester.edu

Imagine hearing music reverberating through caves or echoing across mountains.  This summer, an ensemble of musicians from the Eastman School of Music in New York will be visiting national parks throughout the country and performing in the natural venues.   It's part of the national park service's 100th anniversary.

Private College Association Head Calls St. Catharine Unique Case

Jun 9, 2016
kentucky.com

The announced closing of Springfield’s St. Catharine College last week may have Kentuckians wondering about other private postsecondary schools.  St Catharine officials say a long standing disagreement with federal officials over student financial aid was a major factor in the decision to close its doors this summer. 

Police Body Cameras on Eastern Standard

Jun 8, 2016

We’ve seen “Cops” on TV as the cameras follow the officers. Now we are cutting out the middle man, and attaching the cameras to the officers right here in Kentucky. Berea has them and Lexington will soon.

On this week’s show, a discussion of police body cameras. 

Guests: Assistant Chief Dwayne Holman, Lexington Police; Dr. Thomas Reed, Doctor of Criminal Psychology/Identification, retired from EKU College of Justice & Safety; Lt. Jake Reed, Berea Police; Kate Miller, Program Director, ACLU of Kentucky 

Toyota Marks 30 Years Since Groundbreaking in Central Kentucky

Jun 8, 2016
Stu Johnson / WEKU News

    

Central Kentucky’s largest manufacturer is celebrating a 30 year anniversary.  The Toyota story has been one of great growth.

The atmosphere was light on a brilliant sunny day, outside the auto plant in Scott County.  Toyota President Wil James noted a plane overhead pulling a company banner.  “Now if you haven’t noticed, 30 years has just flown by.  How about that timing,”

Ky. Constables: Untrained & Unaccountable

Jun 8, 2016

Kentucky has hundreds of elected constables. They can wear badges & carry guns. They have the authority to pull you over, serve you with court papers and even arrest you.

What many of them don't have is law enforcement training.

Here's R.G. Dunlop of WFPL's Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting with "Untrained and Unaccountable," a joint investigation with WAVE-3 News.

myoldkentuckyroadtrip.com

    Lexington officials are searching for a new tenant to locate in a historic building in the city’s downtown Gratz Park.  The hope is to have a resolution by this fall.

Public Reading of Council Ordinances, Resolutions to Continue

Jun 7, 2016
lexingtonky.gov

Another attempt to modify the Lexington Council’s rules and procedures to eliminate formal readings of certain ordinances and resolutions during meetings has failed to move forward.  The issue, brought forward by Vice Mayor Steve Kays, was before the council’s General Government and Social Services Committee Tuesday. 

Ky. Officials Continue Work on Education Accountability

Jun 7, 2016
education.ky.gov

Kentucky Department of Education officials continue to seek public comment on developing a new school accountability system.  A 12th opportunity, in the form of a virtual town hall meeting, is scheduled for tonight. 

GE Appliances Sale To China-Based Haier Is Final

Jun 7, 2016
bizjournals.com

General Electric’s Louisville-based appliance division has a new owner.

GE Appliances is now part of the China-based Haier Company. The multibillion-dollar sale was finalized on Monday.

About 6,000 people work at Louisville’s Appliance Park, which was constructed by GE more than 60 years ago. The division will now be called “GE Appliances, a Haier Company.”

Chip Blankenship will continue as president and CEO. He said employees should not expect any major shakeups under the new owner.

treatment-facilities.healthgrove.com

    

A portion of monies generated through a Kentucky attorney general settlement with Purdue Pharma continues to be distributed to recovery and treatment centers.  Tuesday’s announcement concerns a Prestonsburg facility.

wkyufm.org

Animals rescued from an Edmonson County shelter are being nursed back to health at several facilities in our region.

Kentucky State Police raided the shelter in Edmonson County Saturday morning, and sent about 60 cats and dogs to shelters in Bowling Green, Glasgow, and Owensboro.

Many of the animals found at the Bee Spring facility were malnourished and suffer from respiratory problems.

Jamie Ray, director of the Barren River Animal Welfare Association in Glasgow, says the 16 dogs and 11 cats they took from Edmonson County will be adoptable.

Creative Commons

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is expecting a busier-than-usual mosquito spraying season.

While state officials have reported only a handful of infections, fears of the Zika virus have the department ramping up operations.

Keith Rogers, chief of staff for Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles, says the department has enough pesticides to last through the summer.

This week, Tom Martin talks with Mary Claire O’Neal, author of “Becoming What You Want to See in the World”.  Her book has won 3 national book awards and has been translated into several languages and sold in over 30 countries. It is now in its second edition. As a consultant and coach, O’Neal has worked with Fortune 500 companies, healthcare and educational organizations, nonprofits and individuals.

We’re catching up on some message we received before the Memorial Day holiday. First, this call to the Comment Line from listener Josh, “Just curious why we continue to play (the) Q from Canadian Broadcasting System. It’s boring, repetitive and it seems as if every day there is some sort of gay or anti-white or some obscure reverse racism or reverse dogma that occurs on the show.”

Services have been scheduled for Friday in Louisville for boxing legend Muhammad Ali, who died on Friday.

 

Former President Bill Clinton, comedian Billy Crystal and broadcaster Bryant Gumbel are scheduled to deliver eulogies.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has ordered flags lowered to half-staff to honor Ali.

The three-time heavyweight champion had been hospitalized in the Phoenix area since last Monday with respiratory problems and his children had flown in from around the country.

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader. 

This week, they kick off their comments with a mention of the Great American Brass Band Festival and an associated art festival, taking place this weekend in Danville.

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. 

You can also find listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

Madison County Police

UPDATE:  (courtesy Lexington Herald-Leader/Kentucky.com)
 

Deputy Kevin Crutcher was taken to University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital in Lexington, where he was treated for a gunshot wound to the abdomen. According to the Lexington Herald-Leader, he was released last night. (Wednesday.)  

A spokesman for the Madison County Sheriff’s Office told the newspaper Crutcher is a nine-year veteran.

Could Trump Cost McConnell His Senate Majority?

Jun 1, 2016
US Senate

In his attempt to maintain control of the U.S. Senate and send a Republican to the White House this year, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is walking an awkward line when talking about presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump. Capitol reporter Ryland Barton has more.

In an interview on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, McConnell was asked if Trump would drag down Republican candidates for Senate during the November general election.

Grab your hat, gloves, and gardening spade. On this week's Eastern Standard: home gardening and urban farming in Kentucky with guests Ryan Quarles from the Department of Agriculture, Michelle Flannery from the Berea Urban Farm, Abby Adams with Sustainable Berea, and Ryan Koch of Lexington-based Seedleaf.

Cincinnati Zoo

A Cincinnati-based animal rights group filed an official complaint against the Cincinnati Zoo. Stop Animal Exploitation NOW is upset over the death of an endangered gorilla that was killed Saturday after a three-year old boy fell into a zoo enclosure.


kentucky.com

The U.S. Department of Labor is funding a grant that will help some coal miners in Eastern Kentucky as WEKU’s Brian Burkhart reports.

As coal restrictions and diminishing reserves have left thousands of miners without jobs, the grant of 3.4 million dollars will help retrain those affected by the job losses.    


It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader. On their minds this week are the Chamber Music Festival of the Bluegrass and other summer music shows and festivals.    

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo.com. 

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