News

Rehearsed Improv at Balagula Theater

May 6, 2011

Arts and cultural reporter Rich Copley to previews the "Adventures in Mating," which he calls a fun little audience participation play at Balagula Theater. The Lexington Herald Leader newspaper reporter also looks at Bluegrass Youth Ballet's presentation of "Rapunzel" at the Lexington Opera House.

Picking a winner from among the 20 horses in the Kentucky Derby is always a tough task.  This year is no different.  Keeneland’s President offered a little insight to Lexington Rotarians on Thursday.  He also talked about surprisingly high attendance figures during the just completed spring meet.

According to the Associated Press, President Barack Obama will meet with members of the Navy SEAL team who killed al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden when he visits Fort Campbell in Kentucky on Friday. However, Governor Steve Beshear will not accompany the president during his first visit to the commonwealth.

For the second consecutive day, the Republican Party of Kentucky is challenging Attorney General Jack Conway to clarify his involvement in a compromised drug investigation involving his younger brother. Earlier this week, Matt Conway resigned from the prosecutor’s office for undisclosed reasons almost a year after it was revealed he lied twice about being tipped off by Louisville police detectives, who told Conway he was the target of a drug investigation.

The owner of Kentucky Derby contender Uncle Mo says he’ll decide no later than tomorrow morning at 9:30 whether his colt will run in the Kentucky Derby. Uncle Mo, the 9-2 second favorite in the Derby, has been hampered by gastrointestinal inflammation but was thought to be improving.

A central Kentucky woman is helping with the southern storm relief effort as a volunteer for the Bluegrass Chapter of the American Red Cross. Sandy Hall worked as a damage assessor in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She went block by block documenting the destruction caused by last week's EF-4 tornado.

Aid assistance in the wake of natural disasters comes in many forms.  And as Kentucky Public Radio’s Tony McVeigh reports, sometimes it involves sending qualified individuals to places like tornado-wracked Alabama to help field insurance questions. 

In April, over 12 inches of rain fell on parts of central Kentucky.  That runoff, on 22 occasions, flooded the city’s pump stations for 24 hours or more.  And the city says some of that raw sewage backed up into over 20 homes.  Lexington is working on a permanent fix but it could take another decade. Urban County Councilmember Doug Martin says some homeowners can’t wait that long.

Kentucky Derby Post Positions Set

May 5, 2011

Field Of 20 Set For 137th Kentucky Derby

Rick Howlett May 4, 2011

The post positions are set for Saturday’s Kentucky Derby.

The early favorite, at 4-1, is Dialed In, who drew the number eight post position. Uncle Mo is the second favorite, at 9-2, and will break from the number 18 hole. He’s still questionable for the Derby, however because of a lingering gastrointestinal problem.

President Barack Obama has granted the major disaster declaration requested by Governor Steve Beshear in response to flooding in several parts of the commonwealth, including western Kentucky. According to a statement, Beshear’s requests for public assistance and hazard mitigation were granted Wednesday evening.

The floral clock on the grounds of the Kentucky State Capitol is 50 years old.  A golden anniversary celebration at the clock today attracted more than 200 people, including Kentucky Public Radio’s Tony McVeigh.

GM Invests in Corvette Plant

May 4, 2011

General Motors will spend $131 million to upgrade its plant in Bowling Green. GM North America President Mark Reuss says the money will upgrade the plant so it can build the next generation of Corvettes.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has unveiled a plan under which the Kentucky Kingdom amusement park would reopen in 2012. It calls for the city to issue 17-and-a-half million dollars in bonds, and would bring in a third-party investor. The bonds would be backed by parking revenues, occupational taxes, and the new partner. Louisville businessman Ed Hart has an agreement with the Kentucky State Fair Board that would allow him to redevelop the park.

The campaign woes continue for Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer, who is featured in a Washington Post story for being a drag on the gubernatorial ticket with state Senate President David Williams, R-Burkseville, in the upcoming Republican primary.

The results are in of a statewide job satisfaction survey for teachers and principals. Just over 42,000 Kentucky public school teachers and principals responded to the TELL (Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning) survey, which was administered online in March. State Department of Education spokeswoman Lisa Gross says the questionnaire touched on a variety of topics related to work and teaching conditions.

Louisville Metro Government officials are still tallying the cost of damage and cleanup from severe flooding in recent weeks. If the city can claim $2.4 million or more in damages, Metro Government can request federal assistance. At last count, $600,000 had been spent to keep flood pumps running and officials estimated an additional $100,000 would be necessary to repair and clean streets.

With fuel prices approaching record highs, the delivery of energy saving school buses to Madison County couldn’t come at a better time.  Richmond this week welcomes four hybrid buses to the school fleet. Madison County Schools Community Education Director Erin Stewart  says the buses will be used on especially busy routes.

Commercial and residential growth has traditionally been hotly debated in Lexington. It's not likely to change as government officials work to update the city's comprehensive plan. Planning director Chris King told council members Tuesday he welcomes public input.

146 years after it ended, the Civil War’s effects on race, politics, culture and economics in the south are clear. But there’s one tangible remnant of the old south that’s readily and proudly displayed on cars, clothing and, in some areas, over government buildings. Kentucky Public Radio’s Gabe Bullard has more on a modern-day Kentucky export that once led Confederate soldiers into battle.

A fascinating footnote of Civil War history is the fact that the President of the United States at the time, and the President of the Confederacy, were both born in Kentucky. And as Kentucky Public Radio's Tony McVeigh reports, a constant reminder of that fact continues to cause some Kentuckians considerable consternation...(Listen above)

Civil War: Aftermath Still Impacts Race in KY

Apr 26, 2011

A border state during America's Civil War, Kentucky is said to have joined the Confederacy AFTER the war ended. That legacy had a negative impact on race relations that some say exists to this day.

Kentucky began before the civil war to establish its reputation as a horse breeding state. Woodburn farm in Woodford county was known then as a premiere breeding operation. The story is detailed by Maryjean Wall, a turf writer for more than three decades at the Lexington Herald newspaper. She's also the author of a book detailing the civil war's impact on the horse industry. Wall says the 1860's signified a break in the action and recovery took some time.

Paducah, Kentucky's Lloyd Tilghman House and Museum may not have the cache of Arlington or the Lincoln Birthplace, but it's a must-see if you're looking into the history of the Civil War's western theater. U.S. Grant launched his Fort Donelson campaign from Paducah, William Tecumseh Sherman once commanded Union Soldiers in the city, and Nathan Bedford Forrest raided the river town in 1864. The future author of Ben Hur, Lew Wallace, even got into a fistfight during the war in what is now the museum's main gallery.

Long before Internet search engines and network television shows asking celebrities who do you think you are,' genealogists have been combing through census records, newspapers, and family bibles. Family history researchers come from all types of backgrounds, including that of a retired central Kentucky teacher.

"My name is Bettie Tuttle. I was born here in Lexington, 1926, and I've lived here all of my life."

It's a cold rainy, early spring morning at Lexington's Mary Todd Lincoln House, the restored childhood home of the former First Lady groups of visitors from places as far away as Florida and Wisconsin, crowd into the foyer as Executive Director Gwen Thompson preps them for the tour.

"We're going to start right here with this photograph which is an image of what this hallway looked like before the restoration we want everyone to appreciate that it was in quite a state of disrepair so if you'll just head right in here into the family parlor, Marianne is going to be your guide "

earthday

Apr 4, 2011

April means horse racing at Lexington’s Keeneland race track.  The historic track is celebrating 75 years of racing this year.  In recognition of the milestone, Keeneland spokeswoman, Julie Balog wants patrons to get involved.

Civil War: Battlefields Endangered

Apr 4, 2011

In 1862, deadly battles were fought across Kentucky…at Perryville, Richmond, and Munfordville.  In the 150 years since those battles, Kentuckians have worked to preserve those historic sites. 

Pages