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9:09am

Tue August 23, 2011
Education

Students Volunteer Off-Campus

 More than 1,500 University of Kentucky students got out of their dorms and into the Lexington community Monday as part of the annual UK FUSION service event. Junior Son Doan first heard about UK For Unity and Service in Our Neighborhoods, or FUSION, a couple of years ago as a freshman. The finance major spent his Monday afternoon painting a pavilion at the Living Arts and Science Center. 

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5:58pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Education

New School Year, Same Job Market

Monday found fairly a consistent flow of students into Richmond’s book stores.  Classes resume this week at a number of state universities across the Commonwealth. The job market is on the minds of many of the college students. If all goes as she plans, Lancaster Junior Sarah Elliot will graduate next year from Eastern Kentucky University with a nursing degree.  Then, Elliot hopes to work for a Lexington hospital.  Despite the slow economy, the health industry is relatively health.  Still, Elliot worries job seekers may soon flood the healthcare professions.

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5:50pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Education

Training for Female Peacekeepers

Female police officers from close to 60 nations are in Lexington for training.  Among them are officers with the United Nations police division.  U-N gender officer Lea Biason says some of the training is for international peacekeepers. “These are the minimum requirement skills needed for police officers to be deployed in international peace keeping operations,” said Biason.

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3:15pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

"Pigs, Pies, Quilts, Sheep" at State Fair

The 107th Kentucky State Fair kicked off last week, drawing people from all across the Commonwealth. Kentucky Public Radio's Devin Katamaya toured the fair, and brought his recorder along with him. The Kentucky State Fair brings hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. Depending on your taste, you can see animals, catch a show, and eat foods that seem to surprise people every year.

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3:04pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

Encourages Sustainable Horse Industry

Kentucky’s horse racing industry could benefit from a new sustainability program. A state initiative will help racetracks comply with environmental regulations and reduce their footprint. Horse racing is important to Kentucky’s economy, but huge events like the Derby take their toll on the environment—from the trash produced to animal waste and electricity usage.

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3:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Science/Health

Summit Examines Health Inequity

Disparities in income, race, and social status are often reflected in health statistics. The Lexington Health Department is hoping to spotlight those issues during a summit in September.

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2:27pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Lexington Libyans Hopeful of Gadaffi Fall

For Libyans living in Lexington, it’s not another August day but more like the 4th of July.  With rebel victory over dictator Moammar Gaddafi seemingly at hand, emotions are running high. A Libyan expatriate in Lexington has no words to describe his feelings amid rebel gains in his homeland.  Ibrahim El Bakoush has been waiting for the Gadhafi regime to fall for decades.

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1:22pm

Mon August 22, 2011
The Commonwealth

Engineer Fitted With A Big Heart

Arnie LeMay, director of engineering at Frankfort Regional Medical Center, stands beside a 16 million BTU boiler.
Tricia Spaulding Frankfort State Journal

When Arnie heard that a woman was trapped alone in an elevator, he was off to the rescue. He climbed down the elevator shaft, crawled through the roof and kept her company until she was freed. The next day, he sent flowers. In his official capacity, Arnie LeMay, 58, is director of engineering at Frankfort Regional Medical Center. Unofficially, he’s “the engineer with a big heart.” Hospital CEO Chip Peal calls him Frankfort’s MacGyver. Arnie can fix, build or rig anything, which makes him a lifesaver at home, at work and across the globe.

1:20pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Education

WKU President on Retention Rates

Thousands of incoming Western Kentucky University freshmen attended the M.A.S.T.E.R Plan Convocation at Houchens-L.T. Smith Stadium Sunday.
Joel Imel Bowling Green Daily News

As students begin moving onto Western Kentucky University’s campus, President Gary Ransdell wants to get them in, get them through, keep them around and get them out. A major hurdle for faculty and staff this academic year will be student retention, which has dwindled over the years. More than 1,000 students are lost from each new class, Ransdell said during WKU’s opening convocation. “This is tough to accept,” he said.

10:33am

Mon August 22, 2011
Business and the Economy

'No Major Market Gains In Near Future'

The U.S.stock market re-opens this morning after four straight weeks of losses.  Traders remain concerned about the European debt situation and fears that the U.S. is headed toward another recession.  Wall Street Journal MarketWatch columnist David Weidner says don’t expect any major gains in the market over the next several weeks.

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10:31am

Mon August 22, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

EPA Wraps Up Eastern KY Tour

Officials from the Environmental Protection Agency were in eastern Kentucky last week to meet with residents of four communities affected by coal mining. But as those residents shared their stories and concerns, the coal industry criticized the trip as one-sided and anti-coal.

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10:27am

Mon August 22, 2011
Business and the Economy

Lawmaker Has More Questions on Merger

The principals of three merging healthcare systems in Kentucky can expect more questions from state lawmakers.  Last week, representatives from University of Louisville Hospital, Jewish Hospital and Catholic Health Initiatives addressed the Interim Joint Committee on Health and Welfare. They fielded questions about how reproductive and end-of-life services would be protected after the entities merge and Catholic care directives are enforced at University Hospital.

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10:26am

Mon August 22, 2011
Business and the Economy

Future of Insight's Agreement is Uncertain

There are still a number of details to work out in Time Warner Cable’s pending acquisition of Insight Communications.  The sale was announced last week and a Time Warner spokesman says it’s too early to discuss possible changes to service. Many services can be regulated through franchise agreements, which cable operators sign with governments. Louisville’s agreement with Insight has lapsed, and the city has spent the last seven months negotiating a new deal.

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10:23am

Mon August 22, 2011
All Politics are Local

Vote Smart Tests Candidates’s Courage

Candidates running in the 2011 gubernatorial race have aired ads across Kentucky stressing their toughness in recent weeks, and now a non-profit group is putting their political courage to the test.  The non-partisan group Project Vote Smart is sending Democratic Governor Steve Beshear, Republican David Williams and independent Gatewood Gailbrath its Political Courage Test this Wednesday to gauge their views on a number of issues.

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10:20am

Mon August 22, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Something for Everyone at the State Fair

The 107th Kentucky State Fair kicked off last week, drawing people from all across the Commonwealth. Kentucky Public Radio's Devin Katamaya toured the fair, and brought his recorder along with him.  The Kentucky State Fair brings hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. Depending on your taste, you can see animals, catch a show, and eat foods that seem to surprise people every year.

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10:16am

Mon August 22, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Confederate General Honored

The John Hunt Morgan statue was dedicated in October 1911.
Tom Eblen Lexington Herald-Leader

Descendants of Gen. John Hunt Morgan's men and other Civil War buffs will gather Saturday outside the Lexington History Museum to mark the 100th anniversary of Morgan's heroic statue being placed there. But it will be nothing like the spectacle that occurred at what was then the Fayette County Courthouse on Oct. 18, 1911. That day, 10,000 people packed the square, and hundreds more filled the windows and roofs of nearby buildings to honor the "Thunderbolt of the Confederacy."

10:13am

Mon August 22, 2011
Statehouse News

Pembroke Nursing Home Receives Citation

The state Office of the Inspector General has cited a Pembroke nursing home for creating a situation the regulatory agency says allowed a resident to commit suicide. Pembroke Nursing and Rehabilitation Center was issued a type “A” citation as a result of an inspection by the OIG, a department of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, following the July 24 death of Betty Miller. This is the most serious regulatory citation that can be issued, said cabinet spokeswoman Beth Fisher. This citation occurs when there is an “immediate, very serious threat to health and safety,” Fisher said.

10:10am

Mon August 22, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Hardin Woman Meets Pen Pal

Jane Link of White Mills holds a photo of her pen pal Rosie Machin and husband Den. Link has been exchanging letters with Machin for 50 years.
Neal Cardin The News-Enterprise

One of Jane Link’s best and oldest friends lives nearly 4,000 miles away. A White Mills resident, Link has spoken to her friend on the telephone only one time since they met by mail in 1955. On Thursday, they will be in the same room for the first time. “I’m really excited, and she is, too” Link said, grinning. “We send letters back and forth, but it’s not like seeing her.”

10:08am

Mon August 22, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

African-American History Museum Proposed

A group of Bowling Green residents is working toward establishing an African-American history museum to be located in the city's downtown. The museum is looking for a one-time expenditure by the city of $123,000 associated with the museum’s startup. Once the museum was established, it would be independent of the city.

1:06pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Education

Murray State Rehires Suspended Professor

The Murray State University professor who was suspended last spring for allegedly making a racial comment to a black student has been hired by the university on a part-time basis to teach online courses, officials say. In February, it was reported that one of Mark Wattier’s former students had filed a complaint against him with MSU’s Office of Equal Opportunity.

12:59pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Business and the Economy

Next Generation Camry Gets New Look

The wait will be over Tuesday afternoon when Toyota Motor Corp. reveals the highly anticipated, redesigned next-generation 2012 Camry to the public. The Japanese automaker is pulling out all the stops to introduce the vehicle, which will be built at Georgetown’s Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky. A Hollywood-style red carpet premiere that can be viewed online is planned Tuesday for Camry fans and automobile enthusiasts. The global launch will show the first vehicle coming off the assembly line in Georgetown.

12:57pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Sports

Georgetown Basketball Coach Leaves

Happy Osborn

Georgetown College head basketball coach Happy Osborne resigned Saturday to become assistant basketball coach at Tennessee Tech University in Cookeville, Tenn., a NCAA Division I school. His office was cleared, and Osborne said he planned to go to Cookeville Sunday. “I’ve got to get out of here,” Osborne told the News-Graphic in an exclusive interview. “If I stick around until Monday or Tuesday, I’ll never leave.”

12:37pm

Sun August 21, 2011
The Commonwealth

Disability Pension Could Cost Lexington

Embattled Lexington fire Chief Robert Hendricks already draws a service pension from his first career as a Lexington firefighter, from which he retired in 1997. He wants more. Hendricks' request is common in a city where disability pensions are more generous and easier to win than elsewhere. During the past five years, 38 percent of the 119 Lexington police officers and firefighters who retired were awarded disability pensions. That compared to 3 percent for Kentucky State Police and 7 percent for Louisville hazardous-duty workers, including police officers and firefighters.

12:20pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

100 Years of Coal Mining in Harlan

Miners pose at mine entry in Lynch after work. Round lunch pails are triple-tiered to hold both food and water. Carbide lamps are mounted atop soft headgear which actually only served to hold the lights and offered no protection.
Lynch Benham and Lynch Collection, Southeast Community and Technical College Appalachian

On Aug. 25, 1911, a Friday, a Louisville & Nashville locomotive steamed away from a tipple in a hollow in Harlan County with a load of coal bound for Western Kentucky, and the county changed dramatically, forever. It was the first commercial coal shipment by rail out of the mountainous county. Within a few short years, a sparsely populated place that had long been defined by subsistence farming was transformed into an industrial society largely controlled by the coal industry.

11:50am

Sun August 21, 2011
The Commonwealth

Is Kenton Co Smoking Ban Repeal Ahead?

Four months after Kenton County became the first Northern Kentucky county to ban smoking inside most public establishments, the initial furor has died down, but neither side is satisfied. Enforcement issues, exemptions and the lack of uniform rules with neighboring communities raise the question of whether a community can effectively ban smoking on its own. With Campbell and Boone counties allowing smoking and Ohio having a state ban, Kenton County's ban has struggled to succeed and remains in the cross hairs of those opposed to it.

4:45pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Doing the 'Double Cross Over Diamond'

Driver Maneuver Through the Cross Over Diamond Friday
Stu Johnson Weku

An innovative highway interchange in Lexington remains a ‘work in progress.’  Work on the ‘Double-Cross-Over-Diamond’ interchange at Harrodsburg and New Circle is backing-up traffic, especially during  peak driving times.  Opening a third lane in each direction will help, but, Site engineer Tony McGaha can’t say when that will happen.

“At this time we don’t have a real firm date.  Like any construction project, there are way too many variables to really give you a date.  As soon as we feel that third lane is safe for the public and we’ve got the work completed so the workers are protected, we will open it with no delay on it,” said McGaha

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4:32pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

Lyric in the'Green'Light

Lexington's Lyric Theater also carries a LEED certification
Stu Johnson Weku

A cultural center that celebrates Lexington’s Black community now also sets a standard for energy efficiency

The Lyric Theater and Cultural Arts Center is the first city owned building to earn Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold Certification.   LEED certified buildings are designed to reduce waste, conserve energy and water, and improve indoor air quality.  For example, architect Susan Hill says the theater will benefit from solar power generated by the Fayette County School System

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2:13pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

It Takes a Village to Make Art

Daniel Kellogg is this year's composer-in-residence at the Chamber Music Festival of Lexington.
Chamber Music Festival of Lexington

Artists gathered for this week’s Chamber Music Festival of Lexington say the community is on the edge of great things. Daniel Kellogg, who’s the festival’s composer-in-residence, says universities can play a key role in nurturing artistry.  While working at a university, Kellogg says its support allowed him to create an opera.

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1:24pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Environmental Watchdog

Meth Lab Threatens Environment

Kentucky State Police Detective Gary Travis wades through the Gasper River on Thursday as he collects meth making supplies that had been dumped there.
Miranda Pederson Bowling Green Daily News

Allen Key watched Thursday morning as drug investigators emerged from a wooded area along Warren County's Gasper River with trash bags full of toxic waste - the remnants of methamphetamine labs. “It’s disturbing,” he said as law enforcement officers from the Bowling Green-Warren County Drug Task Force and the Kentucky State Police double-bagged the waste for disposal. Investigators found three garbage bags full of meth waste in the river and discovered another bag on dry land near the road. In all, drug investigators found 30 to 40 pounds of toxic waste, most of it in the river.

1:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Education

Aerospace Program to Stay in Frankfort

The nonprofit organization that proposed building a $1.5 million aerospace education center at the Capital City Airport has reached an agreement with state officials to stay in Frankfort. Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education leaders announced last month that they would move to Southern Indiana if a plan to use hangar and runway space in Frankfort collapsed. But Tim Smith, a teacher at Frankfort High School and chief executive officer of the nonprofit organization, says he and state Transportation Cabinet officials negotiated a solution this week.

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