News

Benny Becker - Ohio Valley ReSource

At the age of 38, a coal miner named Mackie Branham Jr. was diagnosed with progressive massive fibrosis, a debilitating and terminal form of an illness that was supposed to be a disease of the past — black lung. But Branham is among many miners afflicted by a resurgence in the disease, and officials are just beginning to realize the scope of the problem. A review of health clinic records shows roughly a thousand such cases, many times more than federal officials had thought existed.

 

Howard Berkes - NPR

NPR is reporting this week on a sharp increase in the number of Appalachian coal miners with the worst form of black lung.

The Ohio Valley ReSource partnered with NPR to better understand what this means for miners and mining communities. Jeff Young spoke with NPR investigative reporter Howard Berkes about why this deadly but preventable disease is on the rise.  

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events.   This week,  Rich Copley is joined by Sally Scherer, Features Editor at the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Among the productions and other events on their minds this week is The Rep’s production of A Christmas Carol: The Musical.


Stu Johnson - WEKU

A group of new Lexington police officers will begin their street duties next week.  Family and friends filled the auditorium at the Blue Grass Community Technical College Thursday for the graduation ceremony.


Stu Johnson

The State of Kentucky is offering a new way for people with disabilities to save and invest money. Legislators in Frankfort got an update Wednesday. 


Stu Johnson WEKU News

The Lexington school district is using career coaches to help students make successful transitions to life after high school.  Fayette School Board members this week got an update on the program implemented at the beginning of the school year. 


Kentucky Department of Transportation

The heroin epidemic is increasing the number of impaired drivers on Kentucky roads and law enforcement officials are being trained this week to better cope with the problem.


A small group representing the Hispanic community brought their concerns about bullying and the potential for deportation under the administration of Donald J. Trump before the Fayette County School Board Monday.


Marisa Hempel

Kentucky writer and activist Silas House is teaming up with singer/songwriter Sam Gleaves for what they’re calling a “folk opera.”


Big Rivers Electric Corp.

A western Kentucky utility is seeking to provide wholesale power to nine cities across the Commonwealth.  The state’s Public Service Commission offered its backing Monday. 


wkyt.com

Kentucky's Department of Public Health is responding to concerns about the Zika virus with holiday travel suggestions.  Officials are especially concerned about pregnant women.  According to infectious disease specialist, Dr. Ardis Hoven, says pregnant women, those who might be pregnant and their sex partners should avoid areas where the virus remains active. 


Roger McGraw/WOUB

During the presidential campaign I visited two regional manufacturing executives who do business in the same county but hold views on trade that are worlds apart. Now that Donald Trump is the president-elect, I asked them and some regional economists how the new administration’s approach to trade might affect the Ohio Valley region.

Here’s a call to the Listener Comment Line, from Brant, in Frankfort, “I remember an announcement about Brenda Lee being near the area. She was going to perform a “litany of her songs.”  I’ve been looking at the dictionary here, a litany is either a prayer consisting of petitions recited by a leader or a repetitive recital.”


Traffic Signals May Be Changing in Lexington

Dec 9, 2016
DMV.org

Lexington could be getting more blinking caution lights. David Filiatreau in Traffic Engineering told the 

Lexington City Council earlier this week that  some stop lights could be switched out for blinking yellow lights.

Kentucky.com

 

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray asked for a moment of silence to open Tuesday's council work session.  It was in memory of two-year-old Nova Marie Gallman, who died this week after being hit by gunfire intended for someone else.  “It’s sad, and tragic, and heartbreaking, the loss of this two year old child,” Gray said.

Council member Kevin Stinnett asked for committee consideration of issues related to youth gun violence.  “When a crime is committed, right now there is no mandatory sentence.  So people who keep using guns to commit crimes keep getting back out,” Stinnett noted.

Marisa Hempel

At this time of the year, we tend to focus on celebrations of our own religions or cultures. But the winter holidays can also bring people of differing backgrounds together.


On this week’s EST,  we’ll discuss ways to enjoy the  “most wonderful time of the year” while including the traditions and customs of those unlike our own.

 

Ky.gov

The future of performance-based funding for Kentucky's universities is now back in the hands of the governor and state lawmakers. Members of Eastern Kentucky University's Board of Regents received an update Monday. 

Kentuckians for the Commonwealth

Some 10,000 signatures were delivered to Sen. Mitch McConnell’s London office Monday asking the majority leader to support the Miner’s Protection and Reclaim acts.

The Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents voted Monday to suspend 10 academic programs.  Three other  academic offerings are undergoing redesign.

Eastern Kentucky University men’s basketball player Jaylen Babb-Harrison has been charged with first degree rape.   According to the Lexington Herald Leader, the 23-year-old is being held at the Madison County Detention Center. 


Green Hills, Kentucky native Nathan Wright holds MBA and engineering degrees and an aeronautics certificate from the University of Kentucky. There was something very special about his time at UK and he talked with Tom Martin about how it led to the development of a satellite that could prevent dangerous space debris from falling to earth.

Here’s an email from listener Caleb, “I am a long time daily listener of WEKU. One of the featured pieces of feedback this week, from Alyce, criticized “A Prairie Home Companion”, and “Ask Me Another.” I have to agree.

Those are my two least favorite programs on this station. I listen to several of other stations, and find myself turning to WUKY, or online podcasts whenever these programs are on WEKU. I know you all have to balance the interests of all listeners, I just wanted to give you another opinion.”

Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World

On Nelson Key Road in Murray, Kentucky, lies a 30-acre tobacco farm and there sits the road’s namesake, Nelson Key himself. He’s just at the end of this year’s harvest, which was brought in with the help of migrant workers.

 

“I used American workers up until 1991 then I went to the migrant workers and I’ve had them ever since,” he explained.

Downtown Development Corporation

Behind-the-scenes work continues to merge two downtown Lexington business-focused groups.  Representatives of both express support for the idea, but admit it will take more effort to get it done.

 

Eku.Edu

Eastern Kentucky University’s governing board is discussing budget cuts Monday, including the possible elimination or re-structuring of course offerings.

There is only one item on the agenda:  "Discussion and/or action on proposed budget cuts and academic program suspensions or modifications."

 


Kentucky ABC on Facebook

A state alcohol beverage control investigator is credited with breaking up an illegal alcohol sales operation


Kentucky.com

 An investigation is underway into a biodiesel leak last month near Little Eagle Creek in Scott County creek 

that killed an estimated 2000 small fish.  Officials said there’s no further significant threat to the creek.

State and local environmental officials are searching for the source of the 3,000 gallons of biodiesel that made its way into the waterway.  State Natural Resources Spokesman Lanny Brannock said the exact cause is not known although a nearby Love’s Travel Shop  is being examine.

Kentucky.com

    Lexington authorities are following up on a dozen or so cases of fake $100 bills or "prop" money. Police Sergeant Brad Williams said many of the bills recovered have the words "for motion picture use only' on them.  “Most people when they’re given a bills they don’t read the words on it,” Williams said. “They basically just see the amount of it, maybe see the picture of who’s on it and that’s about it.”


It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.  This weekend, they’re thinking about the holiday season…


Kentucky.com

Lexington city officials appear headed toward establishing an ‘infrastructure fund’ to help funded downtown developments.

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