At 22 years old, Adele was inspired by the works of Etta James, Jeff Buckley and Jill Scott when she decided to enroll in the BRIT school. By the time of graduation she had perfected her sound and emerged as a soulful songbird and MySpace sensation in 2007 and 2008.

Sam Beam, better known by his stage name Iron and Wine, released his first album, The Creek Drank The Cradle, on the Sub Pop label back in 2002. He wrote, performed, recorded and produced every track by himself at a studio in his home.

This week, Piano Jazz celebrates the season with a set of holiday favorites, as well as some surprises never heard on the program before. Guest host Michael Feinstein performs and presents tunes from the Piano Jazz archive, as well as some treasures from his own extensive collection of recordings by the masters of American popular song.

Jim Lauderdale is an established name in Nashville, where he's written hits for several A-list musicians. But despite 19 studio albums and two Grammy Awards, he's not as well-known outside Americana and bluegrass circles. Lauderdale "never got the lucky breaks that shoot one performer to the top while hundreds of equal or greater merit slog around playing bars, releasing streetwise records that provide songs for others to cover," said friend, collaborator and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter.

One of the great innovators and educators in jazz, Clark Terry (1920–2015) was celebrated for his technical virtuosity and swinging lyricism. He is featured in the 2014 documentary Keep On Keepin' On, which chronicles his mentorship of emerging jazz pianist Justin Kauflin.

Pianist Randy Weston recently returned to Piano Jazz for a new session with host Marian McPartland. Weston got his start playing with Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson and Kenny Dorham in the late 1940s and '50s, and won New Star Pianist in the 1955 Downbeat poll. By the end of that decade, Weston was inspired by the burgeoning civil rights movement in the U.S. and the independence movement among African nations.

We celebrate Father's Day with a special father and son episode of Piano Jazz featuring guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli with his son and fellow guitarist, guest host John Pizzarelli.

Piano Jazz celebrates the late, great Jimmy McPartland: early jazz cornetist, singer, and the husband and mentor of host Marian McPartland. This week's program features highlights from Jimmy McPartland's 1990 guest appearance on Piano Jazz, and a centennial celebration of his birth from the 2007 JVC Jazz Festival.

Pianist John Lewis is a founding member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, whose original members also included vibraphone player Milt Jackson, bassist Percy Heath and drummer Kenny Clarke.

Beegie Adair, the Nashville native with a distinctive flair for the piano, has worked with jazz, pop and country. She's played for movie and TV soundtracks, been in concerts, festivals and clubs, and put in many orchestra appearances.

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Programming Changes Coming to WEKU and Classic 102.1

New Programs such as 1A+, The Daily, Reveal and more...

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Ohio Valley ReSource

Nicole Erwin/Ohio Valley ReSource

Jimmy Tosh sells a lot of pigs. He is owner and CEO of Tosh Farms, Tosh Pork, and Bacon By Gosh, in Henry County, Tennessee, and has 84 contractedbarns in the region where farmers grow pigs for his products.

On a recent July day, Tosh craned over some 1,200 piglets and reflected on how recent market disturbances have affected his business.

 

White House Video

President Donald Trump’s desire to help boost the Ohio Valley’s energy industry and bring back mining jobs could be stymied by the administration’s escalating trade battle with China and other trading partners across the globe.

Becca Schimmel/Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley’s auto manufacturing industry is growing increasingly nervous about the Trump administration’s trade policy. First came tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, key materials for vehicle makers. Now the Commerce Department is looking into taxes on imported automobiles and automotive parts. Both are ominous signs for an industry that employs more than 1.5 million people in the region. Ohio and Kentucky are the nation’s second and third biggest auto-making states, respectively.

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