Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

You simply cannot appreciate the brilliance of Angry Birds unless you play the game. So go get your iPhone or borrow one from a friend. You can download the first game for free.

There are many spoilers ahead in this piece, and by spoilers, we mean this: If you want to be surprised by the final few episodes of Big Love, you should not read or listen to this piece until you finish the season.

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SIMON: Warren Christopher died last night at the age 85, at home in Los Angeles. He was the son of a North Dakota bank clerk who became a blue chip, L.A. lawyer in splendid suits, and a famously self-effacing diplomat.

H: the best public servant I ever knew.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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P: Mr. Breslin, thanks so much for being with us.

JIMMY BRESLIN: Good. I'm here.

: Yeah, you...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

: Indeed, and it's good to have you here, sir.

BRESLIN: Yeah

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports voter turnout is unusually high in some districts.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE)

The earthquake and tsunami that ravaged Japan's northeast has torn the social fabric of many communities wrought havoc on the normal cycles of life and death. In the northern city of Kesennuma, where at least 300 people were killed by the tsunami, communities are struggling to maintain dignity and respect as they send off the deceased.

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

So, of course, we've turned to NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, who joins us. Tom, thanks for being with us.

TOM BOWMAN: Good to be with you, Scott.

SIMON: And is it clear to you that diplomacy's over?

The social networking site Twitter turns five today. The service now boasts 200 million users, who send more than 100 million tweets each day. Twitter co-founder Isaac "Biz" Stone joined NPR's Scott Simon to answer questions about the popular social media site — including the one we've all been dying to know: Why 140 characters?

"I have a good answer for that," says Stone. "From the very beginning we built Twitter to work over SMS, or simple mobile text messaging. The limit internationally for text messages is 160 characters."

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon.

NCAA: NPR's Mike Pesca joins us in our studio. Good to be with you personally, right across from each other.

MIKE PESCA: Good to be with you.

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Ohio Valley ReSource

Nicole Erwin/ Ohio Valley ReSource

Billy Hobby’s days are largely filled by two things: church and pool.

“I play everyday, mostly,” Hobby said, sitting next to his wife, Barbara.

“Well, I enjoy watching him play,” Barbara Hobby said. “He’s got health problems, can’t go out of town and play all the time.”

 

 

Billy and Barbara were in Cadiz, Kentucky, about 20 miles from their home in Princeton so that the 86-year-old pool player could compete in a weekly tournament.

Trump Visits West Virginia Hints at Utility Bailout

Apr 5, 2018
Associate Press

President Donald Trump today visited West Virginia for a roundtable discussion on the recently-passed tax bill. The president also indicated the administration is looking closely at a recent emergency request made by regional electric utility FirstEnergy.  

Trump told a crowd in White Sulphur Springs he is looking closely at a request by the Ohio-based utility for emergency aid to keep its struggling coal and nuclear plants running.


Soy Vey! Ohio Valley Farmers Caught Up in Trade War

Apr 5, 2018
Nicole Erwin/ Ohio Valley ReSource

 

China buys more than half of the soybeans produced in the Ohio Valley. While a new 25 percent tariff is just a threat from the region's largest buyer, the signs of a trade war between President Trump’s tariff list and China’s has farmers caught in its crosshairs. This all comes as the US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue visits the region this week.

Each morning Davie Stevens wakes up to check commodities online, Wednesday morning was no different, except the market price of soybeans had dropped almost 40 cents.

“At a projected crop of 4.3 billions bushels of soybeans this year. Soybean farmers by overnight have lost 1.72 billion in value. So is it a big deal? It's a huge deal.”

 


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