Robin Meloy Goldsby On Piano Jazz

Jan 30, 2009

Robin Meloy Goldsby may have been destined for show business. She had the requisite musical roots –- her father, Bob Rawsthorne, played drums for the PBS program Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood. She also had the early childhood experiences: Through her dad's involvement in Pittsburgh show business, she had the opportunity to act and play piano in various local productions.

Ed Reed On Piano Jazz

Jan 16, 2009

Like many artists of his generation, singer Ed Reed saw his career interrupted by drug use and incarceration. JazzTimes magazine recently ran a piece on the Narcotic Farm, a prison for addicts in Lexington, Ky., known for the jazz players who performed behind bars. San Quentin, where Reed did his time, also hosted some notorious jazz players, including Art Pepper, Frank Butler and Frank Morgan.

Guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli is one of the hottest acts in jazz today. With his hip, swinging and sophisticated style, he makes music that sounds both classic and thoroughly modern.

Alto saxophone phenom Grace Kelly has recorded with icons Lee Konitz and Phil Woods and is a seasoned road warrior with tour dates around the world. And she's till in her early 20s. She recently added vocalist to her resume.

On this episode of Piano Jazz, composer and keyboardist Herbie Hancock stops by in a program recorded in 1987. The ever-inventive Hancock sticks with the acoustic piano for this set of solos and duets with host Marian McPartland. Hancock performs a mix of his originals — "Dolphin Dance" and "Still Time" — and standards including "Limehouse Blues," "It Never Entered My Mind" and "That Old Black Magic."

Veronica Nunn On Piano Jazz

May 2, 2008

Veronica Nunn was born Oct. 7, 1957, in Little Rock, Arkansas. As a kid, Nunn heard all sorts of music, thanks in part to her mother's eclectic tastes. She also got a good dose of jazz from her father, who played jazz trumpet. Nunn began singing and performing at age nine, and some of her early performances included events for then-Governor Bill Clinton.

Bobby Broom was born in Harlem on January 18, 1961 and grew up on Manhattan's Upper West Side. He didn't begin playing guitar until age 12 and his first lessons focused on folk music. A year later, Broom began studying with a jazz guitar teacher named, Jimmy Carter. Though Carter encouraged his student to listen to jazz, Broom was more interested in the pop hits of the day from Earth Wind and Fire and Kool and The Gang.

Chuck Leavell On Piano Jazz

Apr 18, 2008

On this episode of Piano Jazz, keyboardist Chuck Leavell joins host Marian McPartland, along with bassist Gary Mazzaroppi and drummer Glenn Davis, for a set which includes tunes from Hoagy Carmichael and The Allman Brothers Band, as well as some Leavell originals.

Born in 1942 in Harlem, Larry Willis grew up around music; jazz was popular in his neighborhood, and closer to home, he had a brother who played piano. As a child, Willis noodled around on the piano that was in the house, but his talent seemed to lie in singing.

Michel Camilo On Piano Jazz

Feb 2, 2007

Since he first came to New York 30 years ago, pianist and composer Michel Camilo has made a name for himself as an inventive and ferocious jazz player. His amazing skills at the piano, forged at the Dominican Republic's National Conservatory and National Symphony Orchestra — and later, at Mannes and Juilliard in New York — have allowed him to make contributions to the world of classical music as well.


Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Nicole Erwin/ Ohio Valley ReSource

Jacob Goodman drove toward a soybean field in western Kentucky in hopes of seeing something different. Most of the 2,500 acres of soybeans his family farms here in Fulton County haven’t been looking so good, but trees that line Running Slough River protect this plot.

Rebecca Kiger

It’s been nearly one month since President Trump told a group of reporters he was declaring the opioid crisis a national emergency.

“The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I am saying, officially, right now, it is an emergency,”  the president said at his golf resort in New Jersey on August 10.  


A rash of fatal coal mining accidents in the Ohio Valley region pushed the nation’s total number of mining deaths to a level not seen since 2015, sparking concern among safety advocates.

Already this year 12 miners have died on the job in the U.S., compared to eight fatalities in all of 2016. 

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