Roxy Todd

 

"I’d love to be able to stay here,” said 32-year-old West Virginian Mark Combs. “The people are great. But it’s just dying. If you want to succeed you’ve gotta leave.”

Mark is an actor and an Iraqi war veteran. He thinks there has to be a better life, or at least better economic opportunities, elsewhere. He decided to head west for Los Angeles.  


Today, Tom Martin talks with Michael Baer, president of the Lexington digital design company FusionCorp, about plans to brainstorm ways to strengthen Lexington's position as a home to high-tech innovation and commerce.

We begin with a call to the Listener Comment Line from Linda, in Lexington, “My husband and I listened to the “From the Top” broadcast on Sunday evening.  We listened to that all the time when we lived in Boston."


Louisville Congressman John Yarmuth is asking the federal Department of Health and Human Services for an update on Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s Medicaid expansion changes.

State funding for Kentucky's public colleges and universities will be determined by how many and what types of degrees its students earn under a policy finalized by state regulators.

U.S. Congressman James Comer says he is "disappointed" in President Donald Trump's new restrictions on travel and trade with Cuba. But, he said he is encouraged to see American agriculture as a priority for future U.S-Cuba engagement. 

U.S. Department of Energy

Paducah, Kentucky, is home to USEC, a Department of Energy uranium enrichment facility that operated for 50 years until being decommissioned in 2013.

Just across the Ohio River lies the Honeywell corporation’s Metropolis Works, the nation’s only uranium conversion plant.


Copley/Hendren on U2 in Louisville, Other Weekend Events

Jun 16, 2017
Hobie Hiler Lexington Herald-Leader

It's time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Their list of things to do this weekend begins with the U-2 Concert Friday night in Louisville.

Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com.

You can find many listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

An economic development agency targeted for elimination by President Donald Trump announced on Wednesday nearly $16 million in funding to help diversify economies in hard-hit coal communities in seven Appalachian states.

The funding is earmarked for 18 projects in Alabama, Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia, and will create or retain more than 1,700 jobs, the Appalachian Regional Commission said in a news release.

The money announced by the ARC comes from a job organization comprising the commission, the U.S. Commerce and Labor departments, and other federal agencies, and is "a blueprint for new jobs, fresh opportunities, and a robust economic future for Appalachia," ARC federal co-chair Earl Gohl said in the release.

The Republican Party of Kentucky has named Sarah Pickerel as new Executive Director. 

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Summer Fund Drive

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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

HopAlong Farms in Howard, Ohio

The acres devoted to growing hops doubled in the U.S. in just the last five years and the trade group Hop Growers of America estimates that 95 percent of that market belongs to farmers along the West Coast.

But the craft beer craze is changing the direction for hop farms by generating demand for more locally sourced ingredients, and Ohio Valley farmers like Wes Cole want in on the action.

Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

 

Dressed in crisp blue scrubs, Certified Nurse Midwife JoAnne Burris walks briskly, the click of her sensible clogs a counterpoint to smooth jazz in the hall.

The University of Kentucky Midwife Clinic, with its large, color prints of newborns on earth-tone walls, still has that new furniture smell. But word-of-mouth already has the waiting room full.  


Roxy Todd

 

"I’d love to be able to stay here,” said 32-year-old West Virginian Mark Combs. “The people are great. But it’s just dying. If you want to succeed you’ve gotta leave.”

Mark is an actor and an Iraqi war veteran. He thinks there has to be a better life, or at least better economic opportunities, elsewhere. He decided to head west for Los Angeles.  


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