The social justice group Mijente is continuing its efforts to make Louisville a so-called sanctuary city.

The group delivered a petition with about 2,600 signatures to that effect to a mayor’s aide at Metro Hall on Monday morning.

Work Beginning to Repair Sinkhole-Damaged Corvette

Feb 13, 2017

A Kentucky museum says a prized Corvette still covered in dirt and debris from its 2014 fall into a sinkhole has been moved from display to undergo repairs.

The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green says restoration work on the 1962 Corvette will be done at the museum. It says visitors will be able to watch the progress in restoring the car.

The museum says the car needs about $15,000 worth of new parts, including a complete front end assembly, hood panel and windshield. It says the work could take up to a year.

DuPont Offers $670M Settlement For 'Teflon' Chemical Contamination Of Water

Feb 13, 2017

The chemical giant DuPont made an offer Monday to pay more than half-a-billion dollars to settle water contamination lawsuits pending in federal court.

From a listener in Richmond, choosing to remain anonymous, “On Monday, January 23,  a comment was read from a listener named Elaine. She said ‘When I moved to Kentucky from Ohio, I determined not to acquire a southern accent. To this purpose, I listened to NPR for good pronunciation and grammar.’

Kentucky.com

The Kentucky Senate is expected to vote this week on legislation for a relatively new type of relationship between medical patients and physicians called Direct Primary Care.

 The concept is based on a monthly fee, much like a gym membership, to provide routine medical services. 

Currently, doctors interested in such provider-patient arrangements must go through the state department of insurance.  This bill removes that requirement. 

New Leader Named To Kentucky Commission on Women

Feb 13, 2017
Ky.gov

The new chairwoman of the Kentucky Commission on Women is stepping into a brand new role, different than her position as head of an advanced technology firm.

Danette Wilder is president of SealingLife Technology. She said one goal of the Commission this year will be to influence the lives of women in areas like education, entrepreneurship, health and well-being.  Wilder said pay equity remains an issue.


In his farewell speech, former President Obama spoke of the "relentless pace of automation that is making good middle class jobs obsolete.  Today, Tom Martin talks with Dr. Chris Bollinger, director of the University of Kentucky's Center of Business and Economic Research, about the impact of automation on the workforce, now and into the future.

Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

Dona Wells walked through what’s left of the EMW Women’s Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Boxes fill what use to be offices. Sterilized medical supplies are in disarray. A light flickers on and off in the back hallway. She doesn’t see a point in fixing it. At 75, she still runs 25 miles a week, but Wells is tired.

“I was going to retire anyway, probably this year,” she said. But I wanted to do it on my terms, not Gov. Bevin’s terms.”

 

A sweeping criminal justice bill has been filed in the Kentucky General Assembly. It aims to provide workforce training for state prisoners, fight drug addiction and increase penalties for some crimes.

AddiaWuchner.com

A Kentucky House committee has advance a bill that would require college freshmen students to undergo “catchup immunizations” before they begin school.  The vaccinations would cover diseases like measles, meningitis, and whooping cough.  Bill sponsor Addia  Wuchner said a new state regulation requires this immunization in the eleventh grade, but it won’t cover all students.

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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Becca Schimmel/Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley region once helped give rise to the labor movement. Now it’s shifting toward what’s known as right-to-work law. West Virginia and Kentucky have passed right-to-work laws and Ohio is considering a similar bill.

Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

Dona Wells walked through what’s left of the EMW Women’s Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Boxes fill what use to be offices. Sterilized medical supplies are in disarray. A light flickers on and off in the back hallway. She doesn’t see a point in fixing it. At 75, she still runs 25 miles a week, but Wells is tired.

“I was going to retire anyway, probably this year,” she said. But I wanted to do it on my terms, not Gov. Bevin’s terms.”

 

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

She asked to not be identified. And it’s understandable given the stigma attached to addiction. For this story, we’ll call her “Mary.”

 

Mary lives in eastern Kentucky and has struggled with an addiction that began with painkillers and progressed to heroin.

“As soon as I opened my eyes, I had to get it,” Mary said. “And even when I did get it, then I had to think of the next way that I was going to get.”

Mary was using when she learned she was pregnant with her first child. She sought treatment but the disease had a tight grip on her.

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