Senate Passes Strict Penalty For Drug Dealing

Feb 15, 2017
Kentucky.com

 The Kentucky Senate has voted to make all trafficking in heroin or Fentanyl Class C felonies, a measure designed to help reduce overdose deaths.


Kentucky.com

The current heroin abuse problem in Kentucky is causing lawmakers on the House Education Committee to look for new ways to prevent sometimes deadly consequences of opioid use.


Cheri Lawson

Northern Kentucky University is moving forward with the sale of its public radio stations.   

The school’s board of regents voted Tuesday to authorize negotiations with buyers for two of its three non-commercial frequencies.

The university’s board gave its approval for the sale of station WNKU in Highland Heights for $1.9 million to the Bible Broadcasting Corporation. 

An NKU station near Portsmouth, Ohio will be sold to another religious broadcaster.

Marisa Hempel

Kentucky’s universities are facing performance-based funding, likely to be mandated by the General Assembly and the governor. Meanwhile Eastern Kentucky University continues planning for tighter budgets while continuing to revitalize the campus in Richmond.

Gov. Matt Bevin has thrown his support behind a far-reaching criminal justice bill intended to keep those charged with crimes from reoffending after they’re released from prison.

“A job is one of the best ways for a person to not fall back into recidivism, a chance for them to be able to rebuild their lives” Bevin said during a press conference on Tuesday.

The bill is the product of a 23-member panel appointed by Bevin over the summer to recommend a “smarter, compassionate, evidence-based approach to criminal justice in Kentucky.”

A bill that would give hate crime protections to police officers and emergency responders has passed the Kentucky House of Representatives.

The vote on the so-called “blue lives matter” bill Monday evening sparked a lengthy debate and drew protesters to the House gallery. At one point activists shouted down the proceedings and marched out, escorted by state police.

Chanelle Helm, with Louisville’s Black Lives Matter chapter, called the legislation a racist act of white Republican representatives in the legislature.

Ky.gov

The Kentucky General Assembly is looking at ways to improve foster care and adoption, although the real push for reforms is likely a year away.

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling for change when it comes to state adoptions and foster care.  He raised the issue during his State of the Commonwealth address last week.


Stu Johnson/WEKU

Dozens of Kentucky college students rallied for nearly two hours in Frankfort Monday to show their concerns about tuition and student debt  

Student leaders and a number of state office-holders drew repeated cheers in the capitol rotunda.

EDITOR'S NOTE: We apologize for the misspelling and mispronunciation of Bruce Horseman's name. Copy below has been corrected - JH

KET Premieres a new documentary tonight focusing on the opioid epidemic and dives deep into treatment options across the commonwealth.

Opioids – including heroin and prescription opioids such as oxycodone and hydrocodone – killed more than 33,000 people in 2015, more than any year on record, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Deaths due to opioid overdoses claim the lives of 91 Americans every day.

An employee of a western Kentucky mine has been indicted by a federal grand jury for falsifying safety records and lying to inspectors. 

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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Becca Schimmel/Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley region once helped give rise to the labor movement. Now it’s shifting toward what’s known as right-to-work law. West Virginia and Kentucky have passed right-to-work laws and Ohio is considering a similar bill.

Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

Dona Wells walked through what’s left of the EMW Women’s Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Boxes fill what use to be offices. Sterilized medical supplies are in disarray. A light flickers on and off in the back hallway. She doesn’t see a point in fixing it. At 75, she still runs 25 miles a week, but Wells is tired.

“I was going to retire anyway, probably this year,” she said. But I wanted to do it on my terms, not Gov. Bevin’s terms.”

 

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

She asked to not be identified. And it’s understandable given the stigma attached to addiction. For this story, we’ll call her “Mary.”

 

Mary lives in eastern Kentucky and has struggled with an addiction that began with painkillers and progressed to heroin.

“As soon as I opened my eyes, I had to get it,” Mary said. “And even when I did get it, then I had to think of the next way that I was going to get.”

Mary was using when she learned she was pregnant with her first child. She sought treatment but the disease had a tight grip on her.

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