Glynis Board/Ohio Valley ReSource

Thanks to singer-songwriter John Prine, Paradise Fossil Plant might be the only coal-fired power plant that has a household name. “Paradise,” Prine’s 1971 ballad, drew on boyhood memories from the small town of Paradise, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, to relay the environmental and social costs of our dependence on coal.

“Mr. Peabody’s coal train,” he sang, had hauled away the Paradise from his childhood.


The Executive Branch Ethics Commission says that if Attorney General Andy Beshear plans on running for governor in 2019, he shouldn’t investigate allegations that Gov. Matt Bevin used his office to get a deal on a mansion he bought earlier this year.

But the state ethics agency also issued an advisory opinion saying that Beshear could request a third-party investigator to look into the governor’s transaction.

Stu Johnson

Lexington is ramping up its campaign to persuade motorists not to give cash directly to panhandlers along streets. 

Signs encouraging citizens to “Change the way you give” are now up at 46 intersections.

The signs, at intersections known to be frequented by panhandlers, urge citizens to contribute at the website www.lexgive com


Tom Martin talks with Roscoe Klausing about his eco-friendly approach to business landscaping.

A visitor to WEKU dot fm, using the alias “Solo Boy,” wrote in response to Cheri Lawson’s story that aired Friday, Ark Encounter's First Year a Slow Voyage for Williamstown.

He writes, “Any reason why Cheri Lawson neglected to mention that Elmer’s General store is located 2 miles away on the other side of Interstate 75?"


***Updated at 2:28 p.m.

According to Warren County Coroner Kevin Kirby, four of the deceased were members of a Beech Grove, Indiana family returning home from vacation in Florida.  The fifth deceased person was a family friend.  They are identified as Robert Hogan, 74, Carl Boster, 17, Jonell Boster, 48, Lonnie D. Boster, 30, and Lonnie Dr. Boster, 59.

A sixth passenger in the same vehicle was a young male child who was flown to Vanderbilt University Medical Center. 

The sixth person killed in the crash was traveling in the other passenger vehicle.

The first of two public hearings seeking input on Governor Bevin’s Medicaid waiver was held Friday in Somerset.

Governor Bevin wants to overhaul the Medicaid program, in hopes of moving more people to private insurance coverage. Bevin said Kentucky can’t afford to pay for everyone that gained coverage when Medicaid was expanded.

 

The new plan calls for Medicaid recipients to pay premiums of up to $15 a month. Beneficiaries would be required to work or volunteer for 20 hours a week in order to keep their benefits. Those requirements don’t apply to everyone.

Some Kentucky and southern Indiana physicians have been charged in what U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions calls the largest health care fraud takedown in the nation’s history. 

Gov. Matt Bevin has made a combination of spending cuts and fund transfers to fill a more than $152 million budget shortfall after the state didn’t bring in as much money as predicted last during the last fiscal year.

In a news release, the governor’s office said spending in the three branches of state government would be reduced by $59.3 million.

State agencies will also be required to transfer $77.3 million in restricted funds—money collected through fees, tuition or other charges—to the state’s general fund.

Gov. Matt Bevin has filled a vacancy on the Executive Branch Ethics Commission days before the agency is scheduled to review complaints that allege the governor used his office to get a deal on a mansion he moved into earlier this year.

The move means Bevin appointees now make up a majority of members on the five-member commission, which is charged with holding Kentucky governors and their administrations accountable.

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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Pixaby

More than two million people across the Ohio Valley live in areas that lack any option for fast and reliable internet service.

This week some of them had a chance to tell a member of the Federal Communications Commission what that means for their work, studies, and everyday life.  


Glynis Board/Ohio Valley ReSource

Thanks to singer-songwriter John Prine, Paradise Fossil Plant might be the only coal-fired power plant that has a household name. “Paradise,” Prine’s 1971 ballad, drew on boyhood memories from the small town of Paradise, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, to relay the environmental and social costs of our dependence on coal.

“Mr. Peabody’s coal train,” he sang, had hauled away the Paradise from his childhood.


Bob Jagendorf/Flickr


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