Mary Meehan

The sweltering temperature dipped noticeably as the final countdown began just before 2:31 p.m.

The young woman with a microphone and black "Solar Eclipse 2017" T-shirt - the fashion rave of the day- addressed the crowd outside the Hummel Planetarium at Eastern Kentucky University. 

“Three, two, one, put on those solar glasses and you will be able to see our maximum here in Richmond, 95 percent.”

Approximately 2,000 people gathered at Western Kentucky University’s football stadium to view the total solar eclipse, with the much-anticipated  event bringing in school students from around the region.

Keith Brown, principal at Western Elementary in Ohio County, said he was looking forward to viewing the totality and having his students there to see it as well. 


Wildlife officials in Kentucky say people can go online to report suspected cases of a disease in dead or dying deer.

Less than two miles from NASA’s flag singling out the point of greatest totality is the SolQuest festival. More than 5,000 people from the United States and some from other countries plan to view the eclipse from this 75-acre family farm.

Thousands have gathered in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, where the total solar eclipse is expected to be at its greatest intensity.

Officials say the city expects 50,000 visitors from 29 countries, 3 territories and 46 states to be in town Monday for a view of the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse to sweep the United States in 99 years.

Brooke Jung is Hopkinsville’s eclipse coordinator.

As Lexington updates its five-year comprehensive plan, Tom Martin talks with city Water Quality Director Charlie Martin about the influence of the EPA consent decree on upgrading storm and sanitary sewers.


This week, we have a number of calls to the Listener Comment Line. First up, Charles from Lexington, regarding a major news story of the past week.

“After the violence and loss of life in Charlottesville, why Mayor Jim Gray would risk bringing the same kind of violence to Lexington is beyond me.”   


Opioid Emergency: What the Ohio Valley Needs to Combat Crisis

Aug 21, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

The opioid crisis gripping the Ohio Valley is now, according to President Donald Trump, a national emergency.

But more than a week after the president made that announcement, state and local health officials in the region told the Ohio Valley ReSource that they have little information about what that emergency declaration actually means or what additional tools it will provide.

The point of greatest eclipse just happens to be outside of Hopkinsville, Kentucky but the folks at an alien festival down the road in Kelly swear it was written in the stars. The Little Green Men Days Festival is an annual celebration remembering when aliens allegedly visited the rural community 62 years ago to the day of the total solar eclipse.

The Director of the Vatican Observatory is in Hopkinsville to view the total solar eclipse and speak on the confluence of religion and science. Taylor Inman of WKMS News sat down with Brother Guy Consolmagno to discuss how the two are philosophically connected and how the eclipse should be interpreted in Christian faith.

 

Pages

Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Ohio Valley Environmental Council

The Trump administration’s Department of the Interior has asked the National Academy of Sciences to suspend research into the health effects of mountaintop removal coal mining.

A team from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine was established last year for a two-year study.    


Opioid Emergency: What the Ohio Valley Needs to Combat Crisis

Aug 21, 2017
Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

The opioid crisis gripping the Ohio Valley is now, according to President Donald Trump, a national emergency.

But more than a week after the president made that announcement, state and local health officials in the region told the Ohio Valley ReSource that they have little information about what that emergency declaration actually means or what additional tools it will provide.

Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

The country’s newest Republican governor is, like President Donald Trump, a billionaire businessman, a political outsider, and a fan of the coal industry.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, a former coal company owner, was elected as a Democrat but switched parties with a surprise announcement at a Trump rally in West Virginia. 

 

More Information