Two union groups have filed a lawsuit to try and block Kentucky’s new “right-to-work” law, which forbids employers from requiring workers to pay union dues.

In January, Kentucky became the 27th state to pass such a measure, which supporters say makes the state more competitive when trying to get companies to move to or expand in Kentucky.

Kentucky AFL-CIO president Bill Londrigan said the new law is part of a political strategy to stifle union voices.

If the dam failed at the Ghent Power Station’s coal ash pond, it would only take 20 minutes for the toxic coal ash slurry to reach a residential neighborhood in Carroll County. Near the Brown Power Plant in Central Kentucky, homes on nearby Herrington Lake could get five feet of sludge.

Hazard Hosts Appalachian Medical Research Day

May 25, 2017
upike.edu

Kentucky medical researchers are trying to determine why lung cancers strike more often in Appalachia than in many other places in the U.S.  

This investigation was only one of the community-based studies reviewed Wednesday during Appalachian Research Day in Hazard.

Robert McGraw / WOUB

 

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.


Lexington Homeless Shelter in Its New Home

May 24, 2017
Stu Johnson

The transformation of a well-known Lexington provider of services to the homeless is officially complete. 

Government, business, church, and volunteer representatives participated Wednesday in the ribbon-cutting for the new Catholic Action Center.


Kentucky has launched a campaign aimed at connecting Kentuckians with jobs through higher education.

The Help Wanted Kentucky campaign will use social media, advertising and other means to get state residents into educational programs.

The goal is to employ Kentuckians in areas such as healthcare, business and information technology, construction, transportation and logistics, and advanced manufacturing.

Some could finish their schooling with the help of a Work Ready scholarship, which funds up to 32 credit hours at qualifying schools.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell says a Kentucky judge nominated for the appeals court will get a vote in the Senate.

McConnell said the Senate will vote on the confirmation of U.S. District Judge Amul Thapar on Thursday. Republican President Donald Trump nominated Thapar to a vacancy on the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Thapar was the U.S. attorney for eastern Kentucky before former President George W. Bush appointed him to the District Court in 2008. The White House says Thapar was the first federal judge of South Asian descent.

A board that was ostensibly responsible for reviewing coal miners’ training and reviewing all proposed coal mine safety regulations will hold its last meeting next week.

A lottery official in Florida has been appointed as the new president and CEO of the Kentucky Lottery Corporation.

University of Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino said with the return of some key players next season, along with some new faces, the Cardinals will have another strong team.

During a news conference Tuesday, Pitino confirmed that sophomore forward Deng Adel will not remain in the NBA draft and will be back on the U of L roster. Underclassmen Donovan Mitchell and Jaylen Johnson have hired agents and will stay in the draft.

Pitino said the Cards will again have one of the toughest schedules in college basketball.

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Eastern Standard

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Ohio Valley ReSource

Robert McGraw / WOUB

 

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.


  As Congress considers repealing the Affordable Care Act, health professionals in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia grapple with what that might mean for a region where many depend on the law for access to care. This occasional series from the ReSource explores what’s ahead for the Ohio Valley after Obamacare. See more stories here >>

 

Trump administration officials have been visiting parts of the country affected by the opioid addiction crisis, including the Ohio Valley region. The administration called it a “listening tour,” and they got an earful in events marked by protests and controversies.


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