Barton/ Democrats No Majority 

For the first time since the Civil War, a majority of Kentucky voters don’t identify as Democrats as Republicans continue to make gains in voter registrations in the state.

It is a trend  that has been developing for a long time. 

Lisa Graves-Marcucci, Environmental Integrity Project

Curt and Debbie Havens’ ranch style home is the gathering place for their family. Their two boys grew up playing in the streets in this quiet neighborhood in West Virginia’s northern panhandle. Now, their grandchildren do the same.

“They played ball, all kinds of games,” Debbie recalled during a recent interview. Family photos and knick-knacks line the walls. One heart-shaped sign reads “May love be the heart of this home.”

 

“Everybody wants to come to grammy’s and pappy’s,” she added.

Stu Johnson

Beginning later this summer, many of Lexington’s homeless will be able to access free public transportation for a year.  The new program called upLIFT aims at increasing self-sufficiency.

Polly Ruddick oversees the city’s efforts to address homelessness.

She told the city council Tuesday that access to Lextran reduces barriers to employment, childcare, healthcare, and housing.  She says participants must be living in a shelter or transitional housing and  working with a case manager on a plan for a permanent home.

Stu Johnson

Close to a hundred teachers gathered at Keeneland Tuesday for a financial literacy workshop. The day long program was designed to help educators K through 12 incorporate more financial literacy instruction in the classroom as required by a new state law.

Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky’s attorney general wants the state to stop investing taxpayer dollars and retirement contributions in companies that have profited from the opioid crisis. As Lisa Autry reports from member station WKYU, it’s Andy Beshear’s latest attempt to punish the makers and distributors of highly addictive painkillers.

Erica Peterson/WFPL

For decades, Kentucky’s own coal stoked the fires that generated most of its electricity. And while some of those power plants have shut down or switched to natural gas, their legacy remains today in the leftover coal ash that’s stored all over the commonwealth.

Now, new data show the coal ash buried in landfills and submerged in ponds at many of these sites has contaminated local groundwater.

 

EKU Anthropology Team Digging Jackson County

Jun 19, 2018
anthropology.eku.edu

Eastern Kentucky University anthropology students are participating in an archaeological dig at a remote site in Jackson County.  The relatively small site, situated in the Daniel Boone National Forest, was chosen to help the U.S. Forest Service protect historical properties. 

EKU Assistant Professor of Anthropology Jon Endonino says the field work helps prepare students for an archaeological profession.

Stu Johnson

City officials cut the ribbon Monday on the final phase of an affordable housing complex in west Lexington.  It raises the total units available at the Parkside Apartments to 108.

The property, originally home of the Gardenside Cabana Club, then the YWCA, for years suffered from neglect and vandalism.  AU Associates purchased the property almost a decade ago for redevelopment upon receiving affordable housing tax credits. 

More Details On Cycling Death Of WKU Coach

Jun 18, 2018
WKUSports

Investigators have released details on the bicycle accident that killed Western Kentucky University’s golf coach Phillip Hatchett.

The 55-year-old Hatchett was fatally struck by a car while bicycling in a group of six cyclists Sunday morning on U.S. 68 in Logan County.

The Logan County Sheriff’s Office said 27-year-old Robert Stokes of Elkton, in Todd County, was heading west about 7:30 a.m. when he came upon the bicyclists in the emergency lane, also headed westbound.

In this week’s Focus on Business, Part One of Tom Martin’s conversation with P.G. Peeples, president and CEO of the Urban League of Lexington-Fayette County. The Lexington chapter, launched in 1968, is celebrating its 50th anniversary."

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Ohio Valley ReSource

Lisa Graves-Marcucci, Environmental Integrity Project

Curt and Debbie Havens’ ranch style home is the gathering place for their family. Their two boys grew up playing in the streets in this quiet neighborhood in West Virginia’s northern panhandle. Now, their grandchildren do the same.

“They played ball, all kinds of games,” Debbie recalled during a recent interview. Family photos and knick-knacks line the walls. One heart-shaped sign reads “May love be the heart of this home.”

 

“Everybody wants to come to grammy’s and pappy’s,” she added.

Coal Ash Uncovered: New Data Reveal Widespread Contamination At Ohio Valley Sites

Jun 18, 2018

For generations, coal power has fueled American prosperity. But for each shovelful thrown into the furnaces, a pile of ash was left in its place.

Today, as coal’s dominance in the power sector wanes, those piles of ash have grown into mountains as coal ash became one of the largest waste streams in the country, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Special Project: Coal Ash Uncovered

Jun 16, 2018
Ohio Valley ReSource

Coal has long powered the Ohio Valley. But it left behind a legacy of waste: dozens of massive coal ash disposal sites. As the Trump administration changes the regulation of coal ash, the Ohio Valley ReSource and partner station WFPL have analyzed new data from the region’s waste sites. The analysis found widespread evidence that coal ash sites are leaking contaminants into surrounding groundwater. 

In the first of a three-part series, reporters Brittany Patterson and Ryan Van Velzer share what they found and what it might mean for nearby communities.

MORE STORIES FROM THE OHIO VALLEY RESOURCE