Seth Tuska

A Lexington man’s effort to preserve the artistic legacy of his father got a boost this month with an exhibit in Brooklyn, New York.  As WEKU’S Mary Meehan reports, it’s another step in the 18-year journey of Seth Tuska and a way of taking his father “home.”

Although born in the coal fields of Pennsylvania, John Tuska grew up in New York. The libraries and streets of the city fueled John Tuska’s creative spirit.

Wicked Wonders Art Comes to Lexington for Halloween

11 minutes ago
Stu Johnson

Halloween-related events continue to grow in downtown Lexington.  New this weekend will be booths to highlight local artists.

The Wicked Wonders Art Market will join the Farmer’s Market Saturday in Cheapside Park.  Parks and Recreation Cultural Arts Manager Amber Luallen says 15 visual artists will display their works starting at 11:00 a.m.  She says a lot of artists have work that is very in keeping with the Halloween spirit wither either a “spooky feel or whimsical or magical theme.”

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.  On their minds this week is Lexington’s annual Halloween event, the Thriller Parade and a day of related activities.  

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com.

Before the first snowflake has fallen, Lexington City Council members are considering modifications to a new sidewalk shoveling ordinance. 

A final vote on the toughened snow removal law for sidewalks is scheduled Thursday.  The ordinance would require private property owners, including neighborhood residents, to shovel sidewalks within 24 hours of a 4-inch or greater snowfall or face penalities.

The University of Kentucky Center for Clinical and Translational Science is receiving almost $20 million from the National Institutes of Health.  The grant announced Wednesday is expected to further lab-to-bedside patient care.

Dr. Philip Kern says this second multi-year NIH grant will continue efforts to move from studies with mice to trials with human subjects.  The director of the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science says it may involve selective pilot seed money for researchers. 

Ex-Coal CEO Blankenship Argues He's Wrongly Imprisoned

Oct 26, 2016
Ashton Marra/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments Wednesday in the appeal by former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship. Blankenship was convicted last year of conspiring to violate federal mine safety laws in connection with a 2010 disaster at a West Virginia mine.

As reporter Ashton Marra, of the Ohio Valley ReSource, tells us, the panel of judges focused on just one of four of Blankenship’s arguments to overturn his conviction.

Domestic Violence Awareness on Eastern Standard

Oct 26, 2016

On average, nearly 20 people are physically abused by an intimate partner every minute in the United States

On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss domestic violence in Kentucky.

Central Kentucky business leaders got briefings on Southern and Eastern Kentucky economic strategies this week.  The Commerce Lexington-sponsored trip included stops in Williamsburg, Hazard, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Paintsville, and Salyersville.  

Group President Bob Quick says the trip and related events are about coordinated efforts to grow a statewide economy.  The Commerce Lex CEO says it’s incumbent on central Kentucky business interests to reach out and help other economies as well.  “When all the Commonwealth is growing, then we’re all going to do better,” noted Quick.

A motion to remove Lexington’s minimum wage ordinance from the books failed in a Tuesday council meeting.  It took two votes before the matter was addressed at the work session.

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruled last week that Lexington and Louisville’s minimum wage increases were invalid. A motion seeking to repeal the minimum wage statute ultimately failed on a 5-9 vote.

Eastern Kentucky University officials say the school’s freshmen retention rate is at its highest level ever, at almost 75 percent.  The data was mentioned during a Board of Regents meeting Monday.

Eastern Vice President Laurie Carter also told board members that, in addition to an all-time high in retaining freshman, four andfive-year graduation rates continue to rise.  Overall enrollment at the school based in Richmond remains steady at roughly 17,000 students.


Fall Fund Drive

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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Radio


For more than half a century along the Ohio River, the chemical company DuPont provided jobs for thousands of people. One chemical they produced is PFOA, commonly known as C8. It was a remarkably useful compound, used in “Teflon” non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, and even in some food wrappers.


Nicole Erwin/Ohio Valley ReSource

 Mount St. Joseph in Daviess County, Kentucky, may appear calm with the Green River flowing past  homes that dot the farmland here. But there is trouble in the air and it comes along with the smell of a large hog farm.    

Sixty-three year old Jerry O’Bryan was born and raised on a farm in Daviess County. By the time he was 22 he had lost both parents and was left 150 acres to support his family.

Aaron Payne/Ohio Valley ReSource

The sound of sirens in Cabell County, West Virginia, has a good chance of indicating an overdose these days.

The county’s Emergency Medical Service had responded to 622 overdose calls this year as of September 24, according to Emergency Services Director Gordon Merry. Last year it was more than 900 overdoses, which surpassed the total of the previous three years combined.   

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