University of Kentucky Ag Program To Sell Its Own Wine

12 hours ago

The University of Kentucky is getting into the wine business.

The school announced it will start selling wine it produces from its horticulture research farm — but only on a limited basis and to a limited group.

The wine will only be available through a subscription-based community supported agriculture program for faculty, staff and students.

A group of Kentuckians tasked with setting up a framework for charter schools to operate is officially down to work.

(Featured image: Crowd at Fancy Farm 2016)

The annual Fancy Farm picnic and political speaking event takes place next week in far-west Kentucky’s Graves County.

Though no major elections are scheduled to take place this year, state political leaders will still roll up their shirt sleeves and hurl insults at each other during the 137th iteration of the charity event.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Attorneys for President Donald Trump want a federal appeals court to dismiss a lawsuit by protesters accusing him of ordering his supporters to rough them up at a campaign rally in Louisville last year.

Moody’s has downgraded Kentucky’s credit rating because of the low funding level of the state’s pension systems and lackluster revenue gleaned from taxes.

The news comes after the state missed its own revenue prediction by $135 million at the end of the last fiscal year, which finished on June 30.

cincinnati.com

Some 2000 county government officials including many from Kentucky have participated in the National Association of Counties conference in Ohio. 

A northern Kentucky judge says participants spent a significant amount of time on health related issues.


Cheri Lawson

UPDATED 7/25/17 - Officials with the Ark Encounter attraction in Grant County have transferred ownership of the property for the second time in a matter of weeks.  

The transfer is expected to restore the property to its previous for-profit status.


Lisa Gillespie | WFPL

It was surprisingly quiet outside of the EMW Women’s Surgical Center in downtown Louisville Saturday.

Hundreds of anti-abortion activists were expected in front of Kentucky’s last remaining abortion clinic Saturday as far-right fundamentalist Christian group Operation Save America began its weeklong conference with the stated goal of shutting down the clinic. U.S. District Judge David Hale granted a temporary restraining order on Friday establishing a buffer zone around the clinic to keep protesters from blocking its entrance.   


Today, Tom Martin continues his series of conversations about the 2018 update of Lexington's 5-year Comprehensive Plan. Today's guest: Lexington Vice Mayor, Steve Kay.

We had a couple more comments in response to Cheri Lawson’s July 14 story following the first anniversary of the Ark Encounter Noah’s Ark park..

You can see them for yourself on the website. But a couple of highlights,  Mark comments, “…..why is it always ‘banjo’ music that's performed. Even in the bluegrass state that sounds racist to call it 'banjo' music. 'Live' music is the correct term that should be used.”


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Eastern Standard

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Ky. Call 800-621-8890. Email: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com Tweet @wekuest

Ohio Valley ReSource

Healthy Debate: What The Republican Health Bill Taught Us About Medicaid

Jul 24, 2017
Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

Pixaby

More than two million people across the Ohio Valley live in areas that lack any option for fast and reliable internet service.

This week some of them had a chance to tell a member of the Federal Communications Commission what that means for their work, studies, and everyday life.  


Glynis Board/Ohio Valley ReSource

Thanks to singer-songwriter John Prine, Paradise Fossil Plant might be the only coal-fired power plant that has a household name. “Paradise,” Prine’s 1971 ballad, drew on boyhood memories from the small town of Paradise, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, to relay the environmental and social costs of our dependence on coal.

“Mr. Peabody’s coal train,” he sang, had hauled away the Paradise from his childhood.


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